Molly Grace

Molly Grace
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

32
Publications
16,166
Reads
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315
Citations
Introduction
Co-Chair, IUCN Green Status of Species Working Group. Fellow in Biology, Wadham College Oxford. Postdoctoral Researcher/ NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellow at the University of Oxford, Department of Zoology- Interdisciplinary Centre for Conservation Science. Twitter: @mollykgrace Previously: University of Central Florida, Biology Department (effect of traffic noise on wildlife, preventing wildlife-vehicle collisions).
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Wadham College
Position
  • Fellow by Special Election in Biology
January 2015 - May 2017
University of Central Florida
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Assistant
Description
  • Taught 3 lab sections of Biology II, which covers topics including microevolution, phylogeny building, systematics, and vertebrate and invertebrate diversity.
August 2012 - May 2017
University of Central Florida
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Road avoidance behaviors, including the influence of road noise on anuran abundance, and the effectiveness of an animal-vehicle collision mitigation measure (Roadside Animal Detection System).
Education
August 2012 - May 2017
University of Central Florida
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology
August 2008 - May 2012
Duke University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Stopping declines in biodiversity is critically important, but it is only a first step toward achieving more ambitious conservation goals. The absence of an objective and practical definition of species recovery that is applicable across taxonomic groups leads to inconsistent targets in recovery plans and frustrates reporting and maximization of co...
Article
Full-text available
Although evidence-based approaches have become commonplace for determining the success of conservation measures for the management of threatened taxa, there are no standard metrics for assessing progress in research or management. We developed 5 metrics to meet this need for threatened taxa and to quantify the need for further action and effective...
Article
Full-text available
Loud, low-frequency traffic noise can mask songbird vocalizations, and populations of some urban songbird species have shifted the frequency of their vocalizations upward in response. However, the spectral structure of certain vocalization elements may make them resistant to masking, suggesting that species that use these notes could be more succes...
Article
Full-text available
Roads and their associated effects (road-kill, pollution, etc.) have a largely negative impact on animals, especially amphibians, but not all species are affected to the same degree. Variation in life histories may explain some of these differences. Here, we examine how abundance of anuran species in roadside habitats is correlated with an aspect o...
Article
Full-text available
Accelerating rates of biodiversity loss underscore the need to understand how species achieve resilience—the ability to resist and recover from a/biotic disturbances. Yet, the factors determining the resilience of species remain poorly understood, due to disagreements on its definition and the lack of large‐scale analyses. Here, we investigate how...
Article
Full-text available
The pink pigeon (Nesoenas mayeri) is an endemic species of Mauritius that has made a remarkable recovery after a severe population bottleneck in the 1970s to early 1990s. Prior to this bottleneck, an ex situ population was established from which captive‐bred individuals were released into free‐living subpopulations to increase population size and g...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Anthropocene is tightly associated with a drastic loss of species worldwide, and consequently, with the disappearance of key ecosystem functions. The ongoing reduction in species functionality is driven by global and local threats. The orders Testudines (turtles and tortoises) and Crocodilia (crocodilians and alligators) contain numerous threat...
Article
Evidence of avian predation on Greylag Goose (Anser anser) goslings is generally inferential. Here, we report an observation of a Carrion Crow (Corvus corone corone) preying on a gosling in Port Meadow, Oxford, United Kingdom. Our observation demonstrates that, in addition to being an egg predator, Carrion Crows are opportunistic predators of Greyl...
Article
Full-text available
Robust evaluation of the impact of biodiversity conservation actions is important not only for ensuring that conservation strategies are effective and maximise return on investment, but also to identify and celebrate successful conservation strategies. This evaluation can be retrospective (comparing the current situation to a counterfactual scenari...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a “Green List of Species” (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species’ progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accelerating rates of biodiversity loss underscore the need to understand how species achieve resilience, their ability to resist and recover from a/biotic disturbances. Yet, the factors determining the resilience of species remain poorly understood, due to disagreements on its definition and the lack of large-scale analyses. Here, we investigate h...
Article
Full-text available
El Estado Verde de Especies de la UICN (en las primeras etapas conocido como la Lista Verde de Especies) representa un paso más allá en la evaluación del éxito de conservación de las especies. En lugar de evaluar el riesgo de extinción, como lo hace la Lista Roja de Especies Amenazadas, el Estado Verde mide el progreso hacia la completa recuperació...
Article
Full-text available
For many researchers, particularly in academia, publishing in peer-reviewed journals is a necessity, with major implications for their career progression. Yet, it is increasingly recognised that the current scientific publishing model is not fair and equitable, which can have severe consequences for the way science is accessed and used in nature co...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic noise is known to negatively affect many wildlife species by interfering with foraging behavior. Frogs often lay their eggs in roadside ditches because they are predator-free, but it is possible that traffic noise could reduce the survival and fitness of tadpoles, creating an ecological trap. In a series of lab experiments, we tested whethe...
Article
Testing the IUCN Green List of Species - Volume 54 Issue 1 - P.J. Stephenson, Catherine Workman, Molly K. Grace, Barney Long
Article
Full-text available
Historical data are a valuable resource for addressing present-day conservation issues, for example by informing the establishment of appropriate recovery targets. However, while the recovery of threatened species is the end goal of many conservation programmes, data made available through the efforts of palaeoecologists and historical ecologists a...
Article
Species interactions matter to conservation. Setting an ambitious recovery target for a species requires considering the size, density, and demographic structure of its populations such that they fulfill the interactions, roles, and functions of the species in the ecosystems in which they are embedded. A recently proposed framework for an Internati...
Article
Full-text available
Roads create many challenges for conservation, and amphibians are particularly vulnerable to their negative effects. This experiment evaluates the impact that traffic noise has on amphibian populations, specifically anurans (frogs and toads). It is thought that traffic noise may act to reduce population abundances; however, it is difficult to disen...
Article
Roadside Animal Detection Systems (RADS) aim to reduce the frequency of wildlife-vehicle collisions. Unlike fencing and wildlife passages, RADS do not attempt to keep animals off the road; rather, they attempt to modify driver behavior by detecting animals near the road and warning drivers with flashing signs. A RADS was installed in Big Cypress Na...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: A Roadside Animal Detection System (RADS) was installed in January 2012 along Highway 41 through Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, USA in an attempt to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. The system uses flashing warning signs to alert drivers when a large animal is near the road. However, we suspected that the RADS warning sign...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Objectives: A Roadside Animal Detection System (RADS) was installed in January 2012 along Highway 41 through Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, USA to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. The system uses flashing warning signs to alert drivers when a large animal is near the road. However, we suspect that the RADS warning signs could be ignor...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
We aim to develop a new system for measuring species recovery and conservation success. We first propose an ambitious yet practical vision of what a fully recovered species looks like. Based on this, we propose 4 conservation metrics that measure the impact of past and future conservation actions.
Archived project
Large-scale field experiment playing pre-recorded traffic noise in a roadless area to study how the noise affects amphibian abundance and vocalization properties.