Molly Carney

Molly Carney
Washington State University | WSU · Department of Anthropology

PhD candidate

About

11
Publications
2,664
Reads
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12
Citations
Introduction
I use paleoethnobotanical, geoarchaeological, and GIS tools to explore how past people interacted with and related to natural and built environments, working primarily in the Interior Northwest of North America. My dissertation research looks at the relationships and other-than-human agencies between people, plants, landscapes, and environments. I am also interested in the architectural signatures of past Columbia-Fraser Plateau places and employ feminist, indigenous, and agency-focused lens’ to reframe past and present discussions on regional household archaeology.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Washington State University
Position
  • Instructor
Education
August 2014 - May 2016
Washington State University
Field of study
  • Anthropology & Archaeology
August 2009 - May 2013

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Earth ovens, hearths, and middens are common archaeological features in western North America that contain the residues of everyday activities. Ethnographic and archaeological research indicates that these in-ground food preparation features were frequently reused over many months and years. These quotidian features therefore can be productively th...
Article
Full-text available
Biocultural heritage preservation relies on ethnobotanical knowledge and the paleoethnobotanical data used in (re)constructing histories of human–biota interactions. Biocultural heritage, defined as the knowledge and practices of Indigenous and local peoples and their biological relatives, is often guarded information, meant for specific audiences...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biocultural heritage preservation relies on ethnobotanical knowledge and the paleoethnobotanical data used in (re)constructing histories of human-biota interactions. Biocultural heritage, defined as the knowledge and practices of Indigenous and Local peoples and their biological relatives, is often guarded information, meant for specific audiences...
Preprint
Full-text available
Earth ovens, hearths, and middens are common archaeological features in western North America that contain the residues of everyday activities. Ethnographic and archaeological research indicates these in-ground food preparation features were frequently reused over many months and years. These quotidian features therefore can be productively thought...
Article
Full-text available
Paleoethnobotanical assemblages from the Northwestern region of North America often yield geophyte subterranean organs, but these carbonized remains are difficult to identify to species or genus level. We examine 11 species (8 genera) of the most ethnographically prevalent Northwest geophyte foods for macro- and micro-morphologic geophyte features,...
Article
Full-text available
One of the greatest archaeological enigmas is in understanding the role of decision-making, intentionality and interventions in plant life cycles by foraging peoples in transitions to and from low-level food production practices. We bring together archaeological, palaeoclimatological and botanical data to explore relationships over the past 4000 ye...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing use of agent-based model (ABM) simulations to reconstruct past human-environment interactions. ABMs are useful in that they offer scientists the opportunity to model processes and study phenomena and systems that may not be otherwise reproducible or testable. Replication or re-implementation studies of ABMs are, however, infreque...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is a growing use of agent-based model (ABM) simulations to reconstruct past human-environment interactions. ABMs are useful in that they offer scientists the opportunity to model processes, phenomena, and study systems that may not be otherwise reproducible or testable. Replication or re-implementation studies of ABMs are, however, are infreq...
Article
Full-text available
This project considered the deposition history of a burned structure located on the Kalispel Tribe of Indians ancestral lands at the Flying Goose site in northeastern Washington. Excavation of the structure revealed stratified deposits that do not conform to established Columbia Plateau architectural types. The small size, location, and absence of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While the diabetes epidemic among indigenous Native American populations has been examined for more than 30 years, the nuances between environmental and genetic causes of this disease remain understudied. In this paper, I explore the idea that the diabetes epidemic among Native American populations may be partially attributed to the introduction of...
Thesis
Full-text available
The Flying Goose Site (45PO435), located along the Pend Oreille River in northeastern Washington, is a small Late Prehistoric burned structure. This thesis presents the results of paleoethnobotanical and geoarchaeological analyses conducted for five units of Feature 2. Drawing on natural environmental processes and regional ethnography, I formulate...

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