Mohammed Hamdan

Mohammed Hamdan
An-Najah National University · Department of English Language and Literature

PhD
Currently working on Palestinian cartography and digital humanities....

About

19
Publications
2,421
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17
Citations
Introduction
Dr Hamdan is an associate professor of Anglo-American literary studies at the Department of English, An-Najah National University. His work focuses on female sexuality and nineteenth-century transatlantic psychic and bodily forms of communication such as Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Telegraphy and Epistolarity and reconsiders the role of women within these movements. He is currently interested in comparative studies on exile, landscape and national identity in modern Palestinian-Israeli fiction.
Additional affiliations
May 2015 - present
An-Najah National University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
October 2011 - March 2015
Lancaster University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
This article re-investigates the conventional understanding of the female body and voice in ‘Let’s Play Doctor’, a short story written by the Egyptian Nura Amin in 2005. In traditional representations of women in literary discourses, female bodies have mostly been viewed as complex entities and unsettled fields for scientific practices that enhance...
Article
This article examines the relationship between literary geography and the reconstruction of transnational places in Herman Melville’s Typee, originally published in 1846. This year of publication characterises the increasing American movement towards understanding exotic places and their cultural reflections on American society. Typee typifies this...
Article
This article re-investigates the conventional relationship between the Victorian hearth and women in Dickens’s Great Expectations and Hard Times. The Victorian hearth is ideologically tied with meanings of social and familial stability; a place that also signifies patriarchal hegemony and togetherness. However, the hearth and its bodiless, anti-spa...
Article
This article offers a cultural rereading of Dickens’s A Christmas Carol (1843) within a contemporary socio-economic Palestinian context where the rift between classes and the plight of child poverty and vagrancy, in particular, have become rampant. In Dickens’s novella, Christmas Eve in London becomes a significant time of redemption, benevolence,...
Article
This paper examines the father figure in the autobiographies of the Palestinian poet Fadwa Tuqan (1917-2003) and the Israeli novelist Yael Dayan (1939-present). In the early half of the twentieth century, Nablusi women, exemplified by Fadwa, did not have the chance to participate in the political life until the Nakba in 1948. Women subsequently bec...
Article
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This essay probes the notion of silence and women’s acoustic subversion in Surah “Al-Mujādilah” in the Holy Qurʾān and Edgar Allan Poe’s “Ligeia.” In the Islamic tradition and Poe’s literary texts, women’s voices and subjectivity are limited due to their conventional, hermeneutical association with the presumed hidden fear of corruption and violati...
Article
This article employs the monstrous body of Frankenstein to examine political factionalism in the Palestinian Occupied Territories; the West Bank and Gaza. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and its Iraqi twin Frankenstein in Baghdad written by Ahmad Saadawi in 2013, the unnamed monster carries rich cultural and political significations that communicate...
Article
This article examines Toni Morrison's anomalous use of antithetical images of physical mobility and frailty to deconstruct the conventional medical discourse that associates the white race with health and the black race with disease or contamination. Within the socio-medical history of nineteenth-century antebellum America, the mutilated and contag...
Article
This paper investigates the contemporary phenomenon of smuggling sperm from within Israeli jails, which I treat as a biopolitical act of resistance. Palestinian prisoners who have been sentenced to life-imprisonment have recently resorted to delivering their sperm to their distant wives in the West Bank and Gaza where it is then used for artificial...
Article
This article examines the status of women before and after the Arab–Israeli wars, particularly the 1967 War, in the works of the Palestinian poet Fadwa Tuqan (1917–2003) and Israeli novelist and peace activist Yaël Dayan (1939–). In the history of Arab–Jewish struggle, the years 1967 and 1973 represent major national events that registered not only...
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One of the radical breakaways within mainstream literary criticism is John Schad's treatment of critical or nonfiction writing as creative—or what Schad calls "ficto-criticism." In his thought-provoking conversation with David Bayot, Schad takes us to an insightful territory where the critical and fictional finally have "the great train crash." Joh...
Article
The year is 1948. Palestinians, the majority of whom lived in or near the coastal areas extending from Acre to the northern part of Gaza, were dispossessed of their land. The loss of coastal areas, characterised by the abundance of orange-groves and the citrus industry, is represented in Palestinian and Israeli post-nakba literature. Whilst Kanafan...
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This paper examines the experiences and practices of teaching nineteenth-century gender studies at An-Najah National University in the West Bank, focusing on students’ pedagogical reception and discussion of sexuality and gender studies in the classroom. I argue that the classroom, the first subject discussed in this paper, gives students the chanc...
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Full-text available
This paper addresses three major subjects within the context of nineteenth-century female sexuality and epistolary communication. Starting with a discussion of how postal delivery and sexual desire are interconnected in both Dickens’s Martin Chuzzlewit (1844) and Poe’s ‘The Purloined Letter’ (1844), I examine how adestination, or displacement of th...
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Full-text available
This paper examines the association between sound, sexual desire and women within the context of nineteenth-century spiritualist practices in the works of Florence Marryat (1833-1899) and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844-1911). Sound can be an effect of rapping that not only mediates erotic interactions between women and spirits, but also bestows on t...