Mohammad Usama Zahid

Mohammad Usama Zahid
Moffitt Cancer Center · Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology

PhD

About

20
Publications
1,588
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283
Citations
Introduction
I’m currently a postdoctoral fellow at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center working in the Department of Integrated Mathematical Oncology, where I’m working on mathematical models of radiotherapy in Heiko Enderling’s lab, as part of the Future of Radiation Therapy (FORT) program at Moffitt. ‧ I completed my graduate training in Andrew Smith’s lab at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I developed tools for quantitative molecular imaging. ‧ https://zahidmu.wordpress.com/

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Inefficient delivery of macromolecules and nanoparticles to intracellular targets is a major bottleneck in drug delivery, genetic engineering, and molecular imaging. Here we apply live-cell single-quantum-dot imaging and tracking to analyze and classify nanoparticle states after intracellular delivery. By merging trajectory diffusion parameters wit...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To personalize radiation therapy dose fractionation protocols, it will be necessary to first quantitatively describe tumor volume reduction dynamics and subsequently simulate the results of alternative fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: The proliferation saturation index (PSI) model of tumor volume dynamics was fit to weekly t...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: In order for radiotherapy to enter the realm of personalized medicine it will be necessary to model and predict individual patient responses to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Here we model tumor dynamics as logistic growth and the effect of radiation as a reduction in the tumor carrying capacity, motivated by the impact of radiation...
Article
Full-text available
Standard of care radiotherapy (RT) doses have been developed as a one-size-fits all approach designed to maximize tumor control rates across a population. Although this has led to high control rates for head and neck cancer with 66–70 Gy, this is done without considering patient heterogeneity. We present a framework to estimate a personalized RT do...
Article
Full-text available
Immunotherapies are a major breakthrough in oncology, yielding unprecedented response rates for some cancers. Especially in combination with conventional treatments or targeted agents, immunotherapeutics offer invaluable tools to improve outcomes for many patients. However, why not all patients have a favorable response remains unclear. There is an...
Preprint
Cancer is a prevalent disease, and while many significant advances have been made, the ability to accurately predict how an individual tumor will grow, and ultimately respond to therapy remains limited. We use spatial spectral analysis of 20 patients accrued to a phase II study of preoperative SABR with 9.5 x 3 Gy for early-stage breast cancer whos...
Preprint
Full-text available
From the beginning of the usage of radiotherapy (RT) for cancer treatment, mathematical modeling has been integral to understanding radiobiology and for designing treatment approaches and schedules. There has been extensive modeling of response to RT with the inclusion of various degrees of biological complexity. Here we focus on models of tumor vo...
Article
Purpose/Objective(s) As current radiotherapy (RT) treatment schedules are not personalized for individual patients, with the prescribed dose being uniform for particular subtypes and stages of cancer, despite highly variable responses between patients, we performed an in silico trial to determine optimal personalized RT dose for head and neck cance...
Conference Paper
As current radiotherapy (RT) treatment schedules are not personalized for individual patients, with the prescribed dose being uniform for particular subtypes and stages of cancer, despite highly variable responses between patients, we performed an in silico trial to determine optimal personalized RT dose for head and neck cancer patients in order t...
Article
Quantum dots (QDs) are nanocrystals with bright fluorescence and long-term photostability, attributes particularly beneficial for single-molecule imaging and molecular counting in the life sciences. The size of a QD nanocrystal determines its physicochemical and photophysical properties, which dictate the success of imaging applications. Larger nan...
Article
Microfluidic techniques are widely used for high-throughput quantification and discrete analysis of micron-scale objects like cells, but are difficult to apply to molecular-scale targets. Instead, single-molecule methods primarily rely on low-throughput imaging of immobilized molecules using high-resolution microscopy. Here we report that commercia...
Article
Materials with short-wave infrared (SWIR) emission are promising contrast agents for in vivo animal imaging, providing high-contrast and high-resolution images of blood vessels in deep tissues. However, SWIR emitters have not been developed as molecular labels for microscopy applications in the biosciences, which require optimized probes that are b...
Article
Quantum dots are fluorescent nanoparticles used to detect and image proteins and nucleic acids. Compared with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, these nanocrystals have enhanced brightness, photostability, and wavelength tunability, but their larger size limits their use. Recently multidentate polymer coatings have yielded stable quantum dots w...
Article
Semiconductor nanoplatelets are planar nanocrystals that have recently attracted considerable attention due to their quantum well-like physics, atomically precise thickness, and unique photophysical properties such as narrow-band fluorescence emission. These attributes are of potential interest for applications in biomolecular and cellular imaging,...
Article
Full-text available
As molecular labels for cells and tissues, fluorescent probes have shaped our understanding of biological structures and processes. However, their capacity for quantitative analysis is limited because photon emission rates from multicolour fluorophores are dissimilar, unstable and often unpredictable, which obscures correlations between measured fl...

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