Mohammad Abdolrahmani

Mohammad Abdolrahmani
RIKEN | RIKEN AICS · Center for Brain Science (CBS)

Cognitive Neuroscience

About

18
Publications
1,393
Reads
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38
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in visual decision making and visually guided behaviors. I use behavioral tools combined with fluorescence imaging and eye tracking. I am now working on long range modulations of the visual cortex during visual decision making using mice.
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - September 2016
RIKEN
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2009 - October 2014
Osaka University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2008 - April 2009
Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Visually guided behaviors depend on the activity of cortical networks receiving visual inputs and transforming these signals to guide appropriate actions. However, non-retinal inputs, carrying motor signals as well as cognitive and attentional modulatory signals, also activate these cortical regions. How these networks integrate coincident signals...
Article
Full-text available
Significance In vision research, oriented gratings are classical stimuli that drive a large population of neurons in the primary visual cortex, but it is unclear whether mice—a recently popular model animal for visual decision-making—can be trained in a task based on the comparison between orientations. Furthermore, it is unclear which strategies t...
Article
Full-text available
The division of labor between the dorsal and ventral visual pathways has been well studied, but not often with direct comparison at the single-neuron resolution with matched stimuli. Here we directly compared how single neurons in MT and V4, mid-tier areas of the two pathways, process binocular disparity, a powerful cue for 3D perception and action...
Article
Full-text available
Using intrinsic signal optical imaging, Chen et al. (1)show that disparity information in visual area V2 is decodable from correlated random dot stereograms (cRDSs), but not from anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs). The authors conclude that “V2 is the initial locus of false matching elimination,” indicating that the correspondence problem is solved within...
Article
Full-text available
Binocular disparity is an important cue for depth perception. To correctly represent disparity, neurons must find corresponding visual features between the left- and right-eye images. The visual pathway ascending from V1 to inferior temporal cortex solves the correspondence problem. An intermediate area, V4, has been proposed to be a critical stage...
Preprint
Full-text available
Choice information appears in multi-area brain networks mixed with sensory, motor, and cognitive variables. In the posterior cortex—traditionally implicated in decision computations—the presence, strength, and area specificity of choice signals are highly variable, limiting a cohesive understanding of their computational significance. Examining the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Choice information appears in the brain as distributed signals with top-down and bottom-up components that together support decision-making computations. In sensory and associative cortical regions, the presence of choice signals, their strength, and area specificity are known to be elusive and changeable, limiting a cohesive understanding of their...
Article
Full-text available
Visually-guided behaviors depend on the activity of cortical networks receiving visual inputs and transforming these signals to guide appropriate actions. However, non-retinal inputs, carrying motor signals as well as cognitive and attentional modulatory signals, also activate these cortical regions. How these networks avoid interference between co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how the brain computes choice from sensory information is a central question of perceptual decision-making. Relevant behavioral tasks condition choice on abstract or invariant properties of the stimuli, thus decoupling stimulus-specific information from the decision variable. Among visual tasks, orientation discrimination is a gold st...
Article
Kinesiophobia is one of the pain complications which eventually might cause disability. Several studies showed correlation between age-related problems with kinsiophobia. The objective was to investigate clinical trials about managing kinesiophobia among older adults aged +65 years until March 2020. PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO data...
Preprint
Full-text available
The division of labor between the dorsal and ventral visual pathways is an influential model of parallel information processing in the cerebral cortex. However, direct comparison of the two pathways at the single-neuron resolution has been scarce. Here we compare how MT and V4, mid-tier areas of the two pathways in the monkey, process binocular dis...
Article
Full-text available
During perceptual decision-making, the brain encodes the upcoming decision and the stimulus information in a mixed representation. Paradigms suitable for studying decision computations in isolation rely on stimulus comparisons, with choices depending on relative rather than absolute properties of the stimuli. The adoption of tasks requiring relativ...
Preprint
Perception is an active process involving continuous interactions with the environment. During such interactions neural signals called corollary discharges (CDs) propagate across multiple brain regions informing the animal whether itself or the world is moving. How the interactions between concurrent CDs affect the large-scale network dynamics, and...
Presentation
The ability to form abstract perceptual representations that are invariant to physical transformations of sensory stimuli (e.g. size, luminance, etc) is a hallmark of primate high-level cognition. Such ability is critical to efficiently interact with a continuously changing natural environment, but little is known about its neural basis. To study t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Stereoscopic system weights correlation-and match-based disparity representations to support perception of binocular depth. Fine depth perception mainly uses the match-based representation, while coarse depth perception combines both (Doi et al., 2011, 2013). We previously reported that neural responses in macaque area V4 is consistent with match-b...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Stereoscopic depth perception is as vivid for half-matched random dot stereograms (i.e. RDSs with zero binocular correlation) as for correlated RDSs [Doi et al, 2011, J. Vision, 11(3):1, 1–16]. We studied the underlying neural mechanisms by recording single-neuron responses of macaque visual area V4, which attenuates disparity selectivity for anti-...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the effects of total light deprivation on the developing lateral geniculate nucleus, the primary integration centre for visual information Sprague-Dawley rats were reared for one month in a dark room from 7th postnatal day before eye opening. A group of rats was taken back into normal condition for 15 days, and then perfused. Co...
Article
Full-text available
To clarify the organization of the rat lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). A total of 50 male Sprague-Dawley albino rats of 2 months of age were used in this study carried out in the Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran in Spring-Fall 2007. The rats were cardially perfused under deep ether anesthesia, first with a small amount of saline...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal of this project is to advance our understanding of how the brain transforms the initial binocular disparity signals detected in the primary visual cortex to the neural signals supporting stereo depth perception directly. The project is currently supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan ("Adaptive Circuit Shift", JP15H01437) http://www.fmu.ac.jp/acs/en/