Mitchell van Zuijlen

Mitchell van Zuijlen
Kyoto University | Kyodai

About

17
Publications
1,605
Reads
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30
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
30 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012

Publications

Publications (17)
Poster
Full-text available
The light reflected from objects depends both on their intrinsic material properties and the extrinsic illumination. Although object properties tend to remain stable over time, illumination properties typically do not. In particular, daylight’s spectrum, direction and diffuseness change regularly throughout the day. The chromaticities of daylight v...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we capture and explore the painterly depictions of materials to enable the study of depiction and perception of materials through the artists’ eye. We annotated a dataset of 19k paintings with 200k+ bounding boxes from which polygon segments were automatically extracted. Each bounding box was assigned a coarse material label (e.g., f...
Article
Full-text available
Dutch 17th century painters were masters in depicting materials and their properties in a convincing way. Here, we studied the perception of the material signatures and key image features of different depicted fabrics, like satin and velvet. We also tested whether the perception of fabrics depicted in paintings related to local or global cues, by c...
Chapter
Deep learning has paved the way for strong recognition systems which are often both trained on and applied to natural images. In this paper, we examine the give-and-take relationship between such visual recognition systems and the rich information available in the fine arts. First, we find that visual recognition systems designed for natural images...
Preprint
Full-text available
A painter is free to modify how components of a natural scene are depicted, which can lead to a perceptually convincing image of the distal world. This signals a major difference between photos and paintings: paintings are explicitly created for human perception. Studying these painterly depictions could be beneficial to a multidisciplinary audienc...
Preprint
Full-text available
A common strategy for improving model robustness is through data augmentations. Data augmentations encourage models to learn desired invariances, such as invariance to horizontal flipping or small changes in color. Recent work has shown that arbitrary style transfer can be used as a form of data augmentation to encourage invariance to textures by c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deep learning has paved the way for strong recognition systems which are often both trained on and applied to natural images. In this paper, we examine the give-and-take relationship between such visual recognition systems and the rich information available in the fine arts. First, we find that visual recognition systems designed for natural images...
Article
Full-text available
Painters are masters of depiction and have learned to evoke a clear perception of materials and material attributes in a natural, three-dimensional setting, with complex lighting conditions. Furthermore, painters are not constrained by reality, meaning that they could paint materials without exactly following the laws of nature, while still evoking...
Preprint
Full-text available
Designing visual crowd experiments requires both control and versatility. While behavioural and computer sciences have produced a fair number of tools facilitating this process, a gap remains when it comes to the combination of accessibility and versatility. The Processing language is widely used by artist and designers of varying levels of experti...
Article
The human face is a popular motif in art and depictions of faces can be found throughout history in nearly every culture. Artists have mastered the depiction of faces after employing careful experimentation using the relatively limited means of paints and oils. Many of the results of these experimentations are now available to the scientific domain...

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