Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman

Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman
University of Maryland, College Park | UMD, UMCP, University of Maryland College Park · Department of Environmental Science and Technology

PhD

About

67
Publications
32,644
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1,795
Citations
Introduction
Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman currently works at the Department of Environmental Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park. Mitchell does research in Urban Ecosystem Ecology. His group works with approaches from biogeochemistry, ecohydrology, and social-ecological systems to assess the function, effectiveness, and application of green infrastructure, nature based solutions, and novel urban ecosystems. Their most recent publication is 'Identifying the key catastrophic variables of urban social-environmental resilience and early warning signal'.

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
The hydrological functioning of urban trees can reduce stormwater runoff, mitigate the risk of flood, and improve water quality in developed areas. Tree canopies intercept rainfall and return water to the atmosphere through transpiration, while roots increase infiltration and storage in the soil. Despite this, the amount of stormwater that trees re...
Article
Full-text available
While the concept of green infrastructure (GI) is increasingly popular, definitions, terminology, and goals differ based on geographic and disciplinary context. This paper examines these differences through a three-part systematic review: 1) content analysis of academic GI review publications, 2) bibliometric review of academic publications focusin...
Article
Full-text available
Context Coastal zones are a significant coupling landscape and seascape with large global populations and thus have large concentrations of carbon emissions and potential influences on global environmental changes. However, the impacts of coastal seascape pattern change, on the provision of ecosystem goods and services (e.g. carbon flows) have not...
Article
Green Infrastructure (GI) is being adopted in cities all around the world as a key piece of climate change adaptation and water management for local governments. Recognizing that there is increasingly a diversity of actors engaged in designing, implementing, and fostering GI policies, we aim to better understand how urban GI policies take shape ove...
Article
Transition from historic grasslands to woody plants in semiarid regions has led to questions about impacts in soil functioning, where microorganisms play a primary role. Understanding the relationship between microbes, plant diversity and soil functioning, is relevant to assess such impacts. We evaluate the effect that plant type change in semiarid...
Article
Full-text available
Context Coastal zones are a significant coupling landscape and seascape with large global populations and thus have large concentrations of carbon emissions and potential influences on global environmental changes. However, the impacts of coastal seascape pattern change, on the provision of ecosystem goods and services (e.g. carbon flows) have not...
Article
Full-text available
Water management and governance continues to rely on the scientific and engineering principles of the hydrologic cycle for decision-making on policies and infrastructure choices. This over-reliance on hydrologic-based, technocratic, command-and-control management and governance tends to discount and overlook the political, social, cultural, and eco...
Article
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Ecosystem carbon flux partitioning is strongly influenced by poorly constrained soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil). Simple model applications (Arrhenius and Q10) do not account for observed diel hysteresis between Fsoil and soil temperature. How this hysteresis emerges and how it will respond to variation in vegetation or soil moisture remains unknown. We use...
Article
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Ecosystem carbon flux partitioning is strongly influenced by poorly constrained soil CO 2 efflux (F soil). Simple model applications (Arrhenius and Q 10) do not account for observed diel hysteresis between F soil and soil temperature. How this hysteresis emerges and how it will respond to variation in vegetation or soil moisture remains unknown. We...
Article
Forest patches in developed landscapes perform ecohydrological functions that can reduce urban stormwater flows. However, urban forest patch contributions to runoff mitigation are not well understood due to a lack of performance data. In this study, we focus on the potential of urban forest patch soils to infiltrate rainfall by characterizing rates...
Article
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The vulnerabilities of our food, energy and water systems to projected climatic change make building resilience in renewable energy and food production a fundamental challenge. We investigate a novel approach to solve this problem by creating a hybrid of colocated agriculture and solar photovoltaic (PV) infrastructure. We take an integrative approa...
Article
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According to the fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report, the urban environment is responsible for between 71% and 76% of carbon emissions from global final energy use and between 67% and 76% of global energy use. Two important and trending domains in urban environment are “resilience” and “net zero” associated with...
Article
Urbanization affects ecosystem function and environmental quality through shifts in ecosystem fluxes that are brought on by features of the built environment. Green infrastructure (GI) has been suggested as a best management practice (BMP) to address urban hydrologic and ecological impacts of the built environment, but GI practice has only been stu...
Article
Full-text available
While photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy production has surged, concerns remain about whether or not PV power plants induce a “heat island” (PVHI) effect, much like the increase in ambient temperatures relative to wildlands generates an Urban Heat Island effect in cities. Transitions to PV plants alter the way that incoming energy is reflected back...
Presentation
Water, Energy, and Society in Urban Systems III (https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/74301)
Article
Full-text available
Jane Jacobs (1961) closes her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities with a reflection on what type of question a city poses. Her response is one that indicates that cities are complex systems, analogous to biological systems, requiring a set of perspectives and approaches appropriate for the type of question. The development of the field...
Article
Socio-hydrology focuses on studying the dynamics and co-evolution of coupled human and water systems. Recently, several new socio-hydrologic models have been published that explore these dynamics, and these models offer unique opportunities to better understand these coupled systems and to understand how water problems evolve similarly in different...
Article
Full-text available
Urban ecology has quickly become established as a central part of ecological thinking. As cities continue to grow in size and number, two questions serve to unify this broad and multidisciplinary research landscape: (1) how can urban ecology contribute to the science of ecology, and (2) how can urban ecology be applied to make cities more livable a...
Article
Full-text available
Soil microbial respiration pulses in response to episodic rainfall pulses (the “Birch effect”) are poorly understood. We developed and assessed five evolving microbial-enzyme models against field measurements from a semiarid savannah characterized by pulsed precipitation to understand the mechanisms to generate the Birch pulses. The five models evo...
Article
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The integration of research into the design process is an opportunity to build ecologically informed urban design solutions. To date, designers have traditionally relied on environmental consultants to provide the best available science; however, serious gaps in our understanding of urban ecosystems remain. To evaluate ecosystem processes and servi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Can we use trait-based approaches to predict changes in ecosystem processes in an arid riparian corridor? Should we consider environmental impacts at intraspecific, interspecific, or land-cover type level? Main conclusion: Regional species means may be ideal for predicting trait effects on ecosystems. Traits do seem to be...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods With the use of landscape planning and ecological design, the urban environment can be manipulated to enhance ecosystem services. Many approaches to ecological design of green infrastructure originated in mesic environments, leaving questions about their ability to function as desired when transferred to semi-arid envi...
Conference Paper
Cities emerge from a dynamic interaction between local and global scale processes. We can manipulate these processes by recognizing our roles as urban ecosystem engineers to help cities transition to more sustainable and resilient forms. What roles can ecological design and soil stewardship play in this transition to more sustainable forms of urban...
Article
Full-text available
On-going human population growth and changing patterns of resource consumption are increasing global demand for ecosystem services, many of which are provided by soils. Some of these ecosystem services are linearly related to the surface area of pervious soil, whereas others show non-linear relationships, making ecosystem service optimization a com...
Article
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Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetal...
Article
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A greater abundance of shrubs in semiarid grasslands affects the spatial patterns of soil temperature, moisture, and litter, resulting in fertile islands with potentially enhanced soil metabolic activity. The goal of this study was to quantify the microsite specificity of soil respiration in a semiarid riparian ecosystem experiencing shrub encroach...
Article
Woody plant encroachment into grasslands, such as in the southwestern US, is thought to have altered regional carbon fluxes due to the differences in structure and function between grasses and woody plants. It is unknown how climate change predictions for such areas, particularly warmer temperatures and fewer but larger precipitation events, might...
Article
Urbanization has increased anthropogenic non-point sourcing of inorganic nitrogen (N). Elevated inorganic N inputs can alter stream channel biogeochemistry and degrade the quality of downstream waters, particularly in N-limited regions such as the semi-arid southwest. However, it is unclear how N cycling in ephemeral urban waterways respond to epis...
Article
Roof tops can cover one-fifth of urban areas and can greatly alter the movement of matter and energy in cities. With traditional roofing methods and materials, roof tops readily absorb heat and as a result, buildings and the surrounding urban area heat to unnaturally high temperatures. It is hypothesized that extensive green roofs would have wide-r...
Article
Urbanization is arguably one of the most dramatic forms of landscape change, and an important anthropogenic influence on the structure and function of ecosystems. Cities have obvious impacts on local ecologies and environments, such as shifts in species diversity and alteration of local microclimates. While scientists are now familiar with many of...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods In arid ecosystems, the lack of rainfall limits soil microbial activity and in turn nutrient cycling. Soil microclimate and organic content are principal factors in determining rates of in situ N turnover. N-mineralization is the transformation of organic forms of N into mineral forms that can be taken up by plants and...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods As rates of urbanization continue to rise and a greater proportion of the population lives in urban and suburban areas, the provision of ecological services becomes increasingly important to for the sustainability and resilience of cities. Soils play a primary role in the healthy functioning of ecosystems that provide...
Conference Paper
The heat island effect has one of the greatest impacts on the biogeochemistry of urban microclimates. As cities grow hotter from climate change and increased energy consumption, the effect on urban ecosystem function will likely intensify. One strategy for ameliorating local elevated temperatures is to use green design to alter energy balances and...
Article
As rates of urbanization continue to rise and a greater proportion of the population lives in urban and suburban areas, the provision of ecological services and functions become increasingly important to sustain human and environmental health in urban ecosystems. Soils play a primary role in the healthy functioning of ecosystems that provide suppor...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods One of the key ways that local decision making intersects with global change processes is the modification of microclimates through the urban heat island effect in cities. One strategy for ameliorating local elevated temperatures is to use green design to alter energy balances and reduce energy demands for cooling. Des...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Predictions of the future dynamics of temperate savannah ecosystems require an improved understanding of their responses to simultaneous environmental changes. For example, in the southwestern U.S., savannahs are subject to both the invasion of non-native grass species and altered precipitation regimes due to climate ch...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Environmental understanding, decision making, and management are increasingly important as humans influence ecosystems and the Earth system. Education and outreach programs are often aimed at promoting ecological understanding; however many overlook opportunities that allow the public to confront ecological uncertainty a...
Article
Full-text available
Belowground processes and associated plant–microbial interactions play a critical role in how ecosystems respond to environmental change. However, the mechanisms and factors controlling processes such as soil carbon turnover can be difficult to quantify due to methodological or logistical constraints. Soil incubation experiments have the potential...
Article
Introduction: By 2007 more than half of the world's population is expected to reside in cities (United Nations, 2004). As urban populations and the number of cities expand, natural and agricultural lands are transformed into highly altered landscapes. These changes in demography and land use have contributed to the alteration of biogeochemical cycl...
Article
Current and predicted trends indicate that an increasing proportion of the world’s population is living in urban and suburban places. The nature of the urban environment becomes an important factor if we are concerned with the restoration and preservation of biodiversity and ecosystems in and around cities. This article highlights the varied impact...
Article
Earth system and ecological sustainability problems are complex outcomes of biological, physical, social, and economic interactions. A common goal of outreach and education programs is to foster a scientifically literate community that possesses the knowledge to contribute to environmental policies and decision making. Uncertainty and variability t...
Article
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The variability in the type of ecosystem degradation and the specificity of restoration goals can challenge restorationists' ability to generalize about approaches that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms and ecosystem processes, has generated a body of knowledge that can be generally us...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Environmental and ecological problems are complex outcomes of biological, physical, social, and economic interactions that complicate and add uncertainty to environmental understanding, decision making and management. A goal of outreach and education programs is often to foster an ecologically literate community that p...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The pressure to streamline curriculum at research universities has made it more and more difficult to provide undergraduate students in ecology with hands-on training of modern environmental instrumentation. The reduction in the number of laboratory sections offered throughout the curriculum puts exposure to these tool...
Conference Paper
The recent focus on urban ecosystems and urban ecology has had a well-documented impact on the field of ecology but a less clear impact on how people learn about urban ecosystems. We propose a workshop to identify and document key concepts that college and university students should learn about urban ecosystems and the best practices for teaching t...
Article
We evaluated the response of riparian forest soil nematode community structure to the physico-chemical environment associated with urban land use. Soils were sampled seasonally between December 2000 and October 2002 along an urban—rural transect in Asheville, North Carolina. We characterized the taxonomic (to genus) and functional composition (trop...
Chapter
Full-text available
Spatial distributions of trophic interactions define the spatial heterogeneity of food webs and differences between local and macroecological food webs. The concept of co-occurrence has to be given up when larger spatial scales are considered that integrate different local community food webs into a metacommunity food web. This chapter provides two...
Conference Paper
Despite the importance of soil carbon cycling to the response of water-limited ecosystems to global change, our understanding of this ecosystem component is still in its infancy. Adding to the complexity in knowledge building, ecosystems are exposed to simultaneous multiple shifts within global change scenarios. For example, semiarid grasslands in...
Article
Full-text available
We studied soil processes along an urban to rural gradient. To determine the ecosystem response to the urban soil environment, we measured (1) leaf litter decomposition rates using a reference leaf litter, and (2) net N-mineralization and net nitrification rates using paired in situ soil cores. A significant trend toward slower litter decomposition...
Conference Paper
While plant canopies are important controllers over water and carbon fluxes between the biosphere and atmosphere, in water limited ecosystems soils have important direct and indirect effects on ecosystem fluxes. Using whole-ecosystem assessments of water and carbon exchanges in large plots exposed to different precipitation regimes, we have attempt...
Article
Full-text available
"This paper explores some of the remarkable properties that set human ecosystems apart from nonhuman ecosystems. The identification of these properties provides a framework for bridging the theoretical and methodological divide between biological ecology and human ecology. The unique information-processing capability of humans in ecosystems is cent...
Article
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"To better understand and manage complex social-ecological systems, social scientists and ecologists must collaborate. However, issues related to language and research approaches can make it hard for researchers in different fields to work together. This paper suggests that researchers can improve interdisciplinary science through the use of concep...
Article
Full-text available
The urban gradient paradigm was used to investigate the influence of the urban environment on soils in Asheville, NC. A transect of forested plots was established from Asheville, NC to the Pisgah National Forest. The objectives of this study were to: (1) characterize the nature of the urban to rural land use gradient,(2) determine the response of s...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropology and bioecology are currently at a point in their development where researchers in both fields are working towards an integration, which can be described as a form of human ecology. Integration of such disparate disciplines is not easily achieved. Important steps which facilitate integration are the clear definition of terms relevant to...
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) is produced by fermentation in the rumen of cattle. Methane may play a part in global warming scenarios. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is an important forage in the eastern United States. The toxic syndrome associated with the endophytic fungus Neotyphodlum coenophialum (E+) can be mitigated with management strategies that...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Coastal Urbanization and Regional Eco-Environmental Change
Project
My research advances the existing net zero energy research by expanding the spatial and temporary frames within which we analyze the building energy consumption and impact. How does embodied energy contribute to the whole life cycle energy consumption? What is the critical factor deterring the success of net zero energy retrofit projects? How does energy efficient technology cause unintended negative environmental impact and human health impact? What are available design and construction techniques that could balance the energy saving and environmental impact reduction.
Archived project
Utilizing urban tree canopies to reduce nutrient loading is an emerging urban management approach. Our project looks to characterize how urban tree canopies and soils reduce runoff and retain nutrients. This will will inform Chesapeake Bay nutrient reduction credit programs.