Mishal Gudka

Mishal Gudka
CORDIO East Africa · Coral Reefs

Master of Science Applied Ecology and Conservation
PhD Candidature, Conservation Science Research Group, Deakin University

About

14
Publications
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Introduction
Mishal Gudka currently works at CORDIO East Africa as a coral reef scientist and project manager. He has a diverse educational background which includes conservation ecology and mechanical engineering. His most recent publication is 'Feeling the heat: Elevated temperature affects male display activity of a lekking grassland bird'. Works on regional data aggregation analyses related to coral reef health and coral bleaching.

Publications

Publications (14)
Preprint
Full-text available
Ocean warming is increasing the incidence, scale, and severity of global-scale coral bleaching and mortality, culminating in the third global coral bleaching event that occurred during record marine heatwaves of 2014-2017. While local effects of these events have been widely reported, the global implications remain unknown. Analysis of 15,066 reef...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystems worldwide are under increasing threat. We applied a standardized method for assessing the risk of ecosystem collapse, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Ecosystems, to coral reefs in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO), covering 11,919 km² of reef (~5% of the global total). Our approach combined indicators o...
Article
Programs and initiatives aiming to protect biodiversity and ecosystems have increased over the last decades in response to their decline. Most of these are based on monitoring data to quantitatively describe trends in biodiversity and ecosystems. The estimation of such trends, at large scales, requires the integration of numerous data from multiple...
Chapter
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The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region comprises almost 6% (about 15,180 km2) of the total global area of coral reefs, and the region is a globally important hotspot for coral reef biodiversity. The WIO includes sovereign states along the eastern and southern African mainland (Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa), island states (Mauri...
Article
Full-text available
There is widespread consensus among climate scientists today that global climate change is real and has anthropogenic roots. Marine species, for example, are exposed to a large array of abiotic stressors, such as warming and ocean acidification, that are linked directly to anthropogenic climate change. The general view on whether natural population...
Article
Full-text available
A full-text view-only version of the paper is available here https://rdcu.be/bQUYS. Climate change, coupled with an El Niño, caused a devastating bleaching event in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) in 1998. Similar extreme conditions at the end of 2015 meant that there was a very high risk of widespread bleaching in the WIO at the start of 2016. In a...
Article
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This erratum has been initiated as authors first and last names appeared inverse in the original article and should be correctly read as.
Article
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Coral reefs are exceptionally biodiverse and human dependence on their ecosystem services is high. Reefs experience significant direct and indirect anthropogenic pressures, and provide a sensitive indicator of coastal ocean health, climate change, and ocean acidification, with associated implications for society. Monitoring coral reef status and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Most species-climate models relate range margins to long-term mean climate but lack mechanistic understanding of the ecological or demographic processes underlying the climate response. We examined the case of a climatically limited edge-of-range population of a medium-sized grassland bird, for which climate responses may involve a behavioural trad...
Poster
Full-text available
Biological baseline survey of marine invasive species in the Lamu Archipelago conducted to develop species reference catalogues for inference in future invasive species monitoring surveys due to expected increase in maritime traffic due to the LAPSSET Port development.
Technical Report
Full-text available
The third global coral bleaching event started in the North Pacific in the summer of 2014, and continued for a record 3 years, only dissipating in 2017. It affected the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) between January and May 2016, and was the strongest bleaching event to occur in the region since 1998. The main objective of this report is to provide up...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Western Indian Ocean contains 16% of the world’s coral reefs, and the region is now thought to host the second peak of coral reef biodiversity globally. The coral reef ecosystems underpin the economies of the countries in the region, particularly fisheries and tourism sectors, and provide livelihood opportunities and income for local communiti...

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