Mischa P. Turschwell

Mischa P. Turschwell
Griffith University · Australian Rivers Institute

PhD

About

42
Publications
11,760
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656
Citations
Citations since 2016
41 Research Items
651 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250

Publications

Publications (42)
Preprint
Full-text available
Global Theories of Change (ToCs), such as the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF), provide broad, overarching guidance for achieving conservation goals. However, broad guidance cannot inform how conservation actions will lead to desired outcomes. We provide a framework for translating a global-scale ToC into focussed, ecosystem-specific T...
Article
Full-text available
As efforts to restore coastal habitats accelerate, it is critical that investments are targeted to most effectively mitigate and reverse habitat loss and its impacts on biodiversity. One likely but largely overlooked impediment to effective restoration of habitat-forming organisms is failing to explicitly consider non-habitat-forming animals in res...
Article
Water resource development can lead to the significant alteration of natural flow regimes, which can have impacts on the many aquatic species that rely on both freshwater and estuarine environments to successfully complete their lifecycles. In tropical northern Australia, annual catches of commercially harvested white banana prawns (WBP) are highly...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple ocean sectors compete for space and resources, creating conflicts but also opportunities to plan for synergistic outcomes that benefit multiple sectors. Planning and management are increasingly informed by qualitative and quantitative methods for assessing multi-sector interactions to identify trade-offs and synergies among sectors and wit...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting the impacts of multiple stressors is important for informing ecosystem management but is impeded by a lack of a general framework for predicting whether stressors interact synergistically, additively or antagonistically. Here, we use process‐based models to study how interactions generalise across three levels of biological organisation...
Article
There is an urgent need to halt and reverse loss of mangroves and seagrass to protect and increase the ecosystem services they provide to coastal communities, such as enhancing coastal resilience and contributing to climate stability.1,2 Ambitious targets for their recovery can inspire public and private investment in conservation,3 but the expecte...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Studying and quantifying fish behaviour is important to understand how fish interact with their environments. Yet much of fish behaviour in aquatic ecosystems remains hard to observe and time-consuming to manually document. Automated tracking through computer vision techniques can provide fine-scale movement data of many individuals acr...
Preprint
Predicting the impacts of multiple stressors is important for informing ecosystem management, but is impeded by a lack of a general framework for predicting whether stressors interact synergistically, additively, or antagonistically. Here we use process-based models to study how interactions generalise across three levels of bio-logical organisatio...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Seagrasses are important for ecosystem services, including climate regulation and fisheries production. But they are threatened by multiple pressures including poor water quality and coastal development. Seagrass extent is not monitored in many places, so areas at most risk of decline and the management actions needed in these places a...
Article
Full-text available
Global-scale conservation initiatives and policy instruments rely on ecosystem indicators to track progress towards targets and objectives. A deeper understanding of indicator interrelationships would benefit these efforts and help characterize ecosystem status. We study interrelationships among 34 indicators for mangroves, saltmarsh, and seagrass...
Article
Vegetated coastal wetlands, including seagrass, saltmarsh and mangroves, are threatened globally, yet the need to avert these losses is poorly recognized in international policy, such as in the Convention on Biological Diversity and the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals. Identifying the impact of overlooking coastal wetlands in ecos...
Article
Full-text available
As human impacts increase in coastal regions, there is concern that critical habitats that provide the foundation of entire ecosystems are in decline. Seagrass meadows face growing threats such as poor water quality and coastal development. To determine the status of seagrass meadows over time, we reconstructed time‐series of meadow area from 175 s...
Article
Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV; e.g. seagrasses, macroalgae), forms key habitats in shallow coastal systems that provide a plethora of ecosystem services, including coastal protection, climate mitigation and supporting fisheries production. Light limitation is a critical factor influencing the growth and survival of SAV, thus it is important to...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves have among the highest carbon densities of any tropical forest. These “blue carbon” ecosystems can store large amounts of carbon for long periods, and their protection reduces greenhouse gas emissions and supports climate change mitigation. Incorporating mangroves into Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement and their v...
Article
Full-text available
Physiological traits are key determinants of species success in any given environment. Competing metabolic demands can influence success by limiting the available scope for aerobically-demanding activities, including reproduction and dispersal. The present study investigated whether the aerobic performance of Gambusia holbrooki, one of the most inv...
Article
Full-text available
Accurately evaluating ecosystem status is vital for effective conservation. The Red List of Ecosystems (RLE) from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is the global standard for assessing the risk of ecosystem collapse. Such tools are particularly needed for large, dynamic ecosystem complexes, such as the Indian Sundarbans...
Article
Full-text available
Human-induced habitat clearing and pollution are leading drivers of biodiversity loss. Ecosystem assessments are required to identify ecosystems at risk of collapse, but they should account for cross-system linkages and dynamics where necessary. This is particularly true for coastal wetlands (e.g. seagrass, mangroves and saltmarsh), which exhibit h...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mangroves have among the highest carbon densities of any tropical forest. These blue carbon ecosystems can store large amounts of carbon for long periods, and their protection reduces greenhouse gas emissions and supports climate change mitigation. The incorporation of mangroves into Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Agreement and th...
Article
Human activities that threaten ecosystems often vary across small spatial scales, though they can be driven by large-scale factors like national governance. Here, we use two decades of data on global mangrove deforestation to assess whether landscape-scale indirect pressures – cumulative impacts, population density, mangrove forest fragmentation, t...
Article
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global crisis. Severe interruptions to international trade and travel are crippling economies and forcing reevaluation of economic, health, and environmental trajectories. Given that COVID-19 has triggered widespread changes in human behavior and reductions in pollution, it presents opportunities for further...
Article
Full-text available
Stressors to marine ecosystems are increasing, driven by human activities in the sea and on land, and climate change. Cumulative impact maps highlight regions affected by multiple human activities, but efficient conservation investment requires linking dominant pressures to management actions that best address the particular drivers of impacts. We...
Article
Full-text available
Mangroves are one of the few woody ecosystems that grow in hot-arid climates. They can survive extreme conditions of low precipitation, high solar radiation, wide temperature fluctuations and hypersalinity. These unique mangroves have distinct geomorphology, hydrology, forest structure, tree physiology, and soil biogeochemistry. In this review, sup...
Article
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Wetlands of Melaleuca spp. in Australia form large forests that are highly threatened by deforestation and degradation. In America, Melaleuca has invaded large areas of native wetlands causing extensive damage. Despite their status as an endangered native ecosystem and as a highly invasive one, little is known about their C and N dynamics. In this...
Article
China's Belt and Road Initiative is the world's largest infrastructure development project aimed at linking Europe and East Africa with Asia. Port infrastructure development associated with the maritime component of China's Belt and Road Initiative (mBRI) could have trans-boundary environmental impacts. These impacts are likely to affect key coasta...
Article
The distribution and population structure of organisms is governed by a broad suite of biotic and abiotic variables, interacting across multiple scales. Recruitment is a key demographic process critical to the maintenance of successful populations. Isolating and quantifying the multiscale environmental drivers of recruitment is vital for species co...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss is accelerating a global extinction crisis. Conservation requires understanding links between species and habitats. Emerging research is revealing important associations between vegetated coastal wetlands and marine megafauna, such as cetaceans, sea turtles, and sharks. But these links have not been reviewed and the importance of these...
Article
Full-text available
• Predator–prey interactions are an inherently local‐scale phenomenon, but the intensity of these interactions can be mediated by abiotic conditions that can exert a multi‐scaled influence through space and time. Understanding how multi‐scale abiotic factors may influence local‐scale biotic processes has proven challenging; however, the hierarchica...
Article
Excess nitrogen (N) leading to the eutrophication of water and impacts on ecosystems is a serious environmental challenge. Wetlands can remove significant amounts of N from the water, primarily through the process of denitrification. Most of our knowledge on wetland denitrification is from temperate climates; studies in natural tropical wetlands ar...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Land and water resource developments have the potential to modify rivers, floodplains, estuaries and coastal waters, changing habitats and ecological processes that support native flora and fauna. The Ecology activity of the Northern Australia Water Resource Assessment (the Assessment) will assess the impacts of potential changes in flow on freshwa...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Land and water resource developments have the potential to modify rivers, floodplains, estuaries and coastal waters, changing habitats and ecological processes that support native flora and fauna. The Ecology activity of the Northern Australia Water Resource Assessment (the Assessment) will assess the impacts of potential changes in flow on freshwa...
Article
At the crux of the debate over the global sustainability of fisheries is what society must do to prevent over‐exploitation and aid recovery of fisheries that have historically been over‐exploited. The focus of debates has been on controlling fishing pressure, and assessments have not considered that stock production may be affected by changes in fi...
Article
Full-text available
• Freshwater ecosystems and their associated biota are under increasing threats from multiple stressors including climate and land‐use change. The conservation of these ecosystems must be based on an integration of data including species physiological tolerances, the biotic and abiotic drivers of the distribution of populations, and demographic pro...
Preprint
Full-text available
At the crux of the debate over the global sustainability of fisheries is what society must do prevent overexploitation of fisheries and aid recovery of fisheries that have historically been overexploited. The focus of debates has been on controlling fishing pressure and assessments have not considered that stock production may be affected by change...
Article
Full-text available
Our lack of knowledge on the spatiotemporal drivers of the distribution of many freshwater fishes, particularly as they differ among life-history stages, is a challenge to conservation of these species. We used 2-stage hurdle models to investigate drivers of occurrence and abundance of locally threatened adult and juvenile Northern River Blackfish...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been hypothesised that there is a functional correlation between brain size and metabolic rate in vertebrates. The present study tested this hypothesis in wild-caught adult mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki by testing for an intra-specific association between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and brain size while controlling for variation in b...
Article
Dryland river foodwebs are thought to be largely driven by autochthonous production derived from littoral/benthic algae, particularly during extended periods of zero flow, with allochthonous production taking primacy after flooding as floodplain carbon is distributed into waterholes during flood recession. This study tested whether we could detect...

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