Miranda C Jones

Miranda C Jones

PhD

About

63
Publications
30,041
Reads
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2,090
Citations
Citations since 2016
41 Research Items
1899 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
May 2013 - June 2015
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2010 - March 2013
University of East Anglia
Description
  • PhD Investigating the ecological and economic implications of marine climate change in the UK
Education
October 2007 - October 2008
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Conservation Science
September 2004 - June 2007
University of Oxford
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
While the physical dimensions of climate change are now routinely assessed through multimodel intercomparisons, projected impacts on the global ocean ecosystem generally rely on individual models with a specific set of assumptions. To address these single-model limitations, we present standardized ensemble projections from six global marine ecosyst...
Article
Harmful algae can cause death in fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and humans, via their toxins or from effects associated with their sheer quantity. There are many species, which cause a variety of problems around north-west Europe, and the frequency and distribution of algal blooms have altered in the recent past. Species distribution modelling wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is shifting the abundance and distribution of marine species with consequences for ecosystem functioning, seafood supply, management and conservation. Several approaches for future projection exist but these have never been compared systematically to assess their variability. We conducted standardized ensemble projections including 6...
Article
Full-text available
Risk of impact of marine fishes to fishing and climate change (including ocean acidification) depend on the species’ ecological and biological characteristics, as well as their exposure to over‐exploitation and climate hazards. These human‐induced hazards should be considered concurrently in conservation risk assessment. In this study, we aim to ex...
Article
Full-text available
Model intercomparison studies in the climate and Earth sciences communities have been crucial to building credibility and coherence for future projections. They have quantified variability among models, spurred model development, contrasted within- and among-model uncertainty, assessed model fits to historical data, and provided ensemble projection...
Article
Full-text available
We review and compare four broad categories of spatially-explicit modelling approaches currently used to understand and project changes in the distribution and productivity of living marine resources including: 1) statistical species distribution models, 2) physiology-based, biophysical models of single life stages or the whole life cycle of specie...
Article
Full-text available
Human-driven global change is causing ongoing declines in biodiversity worldwide. In order to address these declines, decision-makers need accurate assessments of the status of and pressures on biodiversity. However, these are heavily constrained by incomplete and uneven spatial, temporal and taxonomic coverage. For instance, data from regions such...
Preprint
Full-text available
Model intercomparison studies in the climate and earth sciences communities have been crucial to build credibility and coherence for future projections. They have quantified variability among models, spurred model development, contrasted within- and among-model uncertainty, assessed model fits to historical data, and provided ensemble projections o...
Article
Marine species are being impacted by climate change and ocean acidification, although their level of vulnerability varies due to differences in species' sensitivity, adaptive capacity and exposure to climate hazards. Due to limited data on the biological and ecological attributes of many marine species, as well as inherent uncertainties in the asse...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change can affect the survival, colonization and establishment of non-native species. Many non-native species common in Europe are spreading northwards as seawater temperatures increase. The similarity of climatic conditions between source and recipient areas is assumed to influence the establishment of such species, however, in a changing...
Article
Marine eutrophication refers to an ecosystem response to the loading of nutrients, typically nitrogen (N), to coastal waters where several impacts may occur. The increase of planktonic growth due to N-enrichment fuels the organic carbon cycles and may lead to excessive oxygen depletion in benthic waters. Such hypoxic conditions may cause severe eff...
Chapter
Full-text available
Fishers and scientists have known for over 100 years that the status of fish stocks can be greatly influenced by prevailing climatic conditions. Based on historical sea surface temperature data, the North Sea has been identified as one of 20 ‘hot spots’ of climate change globally and projections for the next 100 years suggest that the region will c...
Article
Climate change is projected to redistribute fisheries resources, resulting in tropical regions suffering decreases in seafood production. While sustainably managing marine ecosystems contributes to building climate resilience, these solutions require transformation of ocean governance. Recent studies and international initiatives suggest that conse...
Article
Full-text available
The Paris Conference of Parties (COP21) agreement renewed momentum for action against climate change, creating the space for solutions for conservation of the ocean addressing two of its largest threats: climate change and ocean acidification (CCOA). Recent arguments that ocean policies disregard a mature conservation research field and that protec...
Article
The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights that climate change and ocean acidification are challenging the sustainable management of living marine resources (LMRs). Formal and systematic treatment of uncertainty in existing LMR projections, however, is lacking. We synthesize knowledge of how to address d...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have demonstrated ways in which climate-related shifts in the distributions and relative abundances of marine species are expected to alter the dynamics and catch potential of global fisheries. While these studies assess impacts on large-scale commercial fisheries, few efforts have been made to quantitatively project impacts on small-scale...
Data
Correlations between (A) cumulative change in relative catch potential and latitude, and (B) change in species’ catch potential (%) and latitude. Materials include cumulative change in relative catch potential by domestic fishing area (Table A) and number of species (n) whose catch potential (%) is projected to increase, decrease, or remain neutral...
Data
Sensitivity analyses using a multi-model ensemble of projected changes in relative catch potential by species (Table A) and a multi-model ensemble of projected latitudinal range shifts by species (Table B). Results are ordered by least to greatest standard deviation. Projections from AquaMaps and Maxent obtained from Jones and Cheung (2014). (PDF)
Data
Sample of 98 species included in the analysis, ordered alphabetically by common name. (PDF)
Data
Projected change in relative abundance for 98 species under the lower (RCP 2.6) and upper (RCP 8.5) scenarios of climate change. Projections obtained using the Dynamic Bioclimate Envelope Model (DBEM). (PDF)
Data
Projected latitudinal range shifts for 98 species by 2050 relative to 2000 under the lower (RCP 2.6) and upper (RCP 8.5) scenarios of climate change, derived from the Dynamic Bioclimate Envelope Model (DBEM). Ordered from greatest to least latitudinal range shift under RCP 8.5. (PDF)
Data
Domestic fishing areas of BC First Nations included in analysis. Detailed methodology for deriving domestic fishing areas from Statement of Intent (SOI) boundaries submitted during the BC Treaty Process, with metadata and link to data source. (PDF)
Data
First Nations’ participation in British Columbia’s commercial fisheries by percentage and number held of available licenses. Not all licenses may be active. Detailed data outlining species used to calculate aggregated impacts to each commercial fishery are available by request. (PDF)
Data
Sample of First Nations’ traditional fisheries management approaches and analogous Western fisheries management strategies. (PDF)
Data
Species distribution and life history data used in the analysis. This Access database includes the data used to run the DBEM. (ACCDB)
Data
Sampled commercially-caught species aggregated by fishery. The proportion of species included in the analysis relative to those included in each fishery’s quota is noted. (XLSX)
Data
Projected change in relative catch potential for 98 species under the lower (RCP 2.6) and upper (RCP 8.5) scenarios of climate change. Estimates obtained using projected changes in relative abundance and Eq 5. Values in red indicate an insignificant change in catch potential, with disagreement regarding the directionality of the projected change in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The availability and appropriate use of marine and coastal data form the foundation of effective decision-making. This manual, as the second edition of the manual published by Martin et al. in 2014, aims to provide an overview of global marine and coastal datasets of biodiversity importance. The intention is to address the fragmented information an...
Article
Full-text available
Projections of the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems are a key prerequisite for the planning of adaptation strategies, yet are inevitably associated with uncertainty. Identifying, quantifying, and communicating this uncertainty is key to both evaluating the risk associated with a projection and building confidence in its robustness. We...
Article
Full-text available
model ensemble projections of climate change effects on global marine biodiversity. – ICES Species distribution models (SDMs) are important tools to explore the effects of future global changes in biodiversity. Previous studies show that variability is introduced into projected distributions through alternative datasets and modelling procedures. Ho...
Article
Over-exploitation and economic underperformance are widespread in the world's fisheries. Global climate change is further affecting the distribution of marine species, raising concern for the persistence of biodiversity and presenting additional challenges to fisheries management. However, few studies have attempted to extend bioclimatic projection...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Knowledge of marine and coastal datasets tends to be fragmented and/or difficult to access for the non-expert or ad hoc data user. To address this lack of information, this document provides an overview of global marine and coastal datasets of biodiversity importance, and also includes some datasets of regional interest. This non-exhaustive review...
Data
Detailed methods used to produce the 71 questions (Appendix S1) are available online. The authors are solely responsible for the content and functionality of these materials. Queries (other than absence of the material) should be directed to the corresponding author.
Article
Full-text available
The ocean provides food, economic activity, and cultural value for a large proportion of humanity. Our knowledge of marine ecosystems lags behind that of terrestrial ecosystems, limiting effective protection of marine resources. We describe the outcome of 2 workshops in 2011 and 2012 to establish a list of important questions, which, if answered, w...
Article
The inherent complexity of the environment is such that attempts to model it must operate under simplifications and assumptions. Considering predictions from alternative models, with a range of assumptions and data requirements, therefore provides a more robust approach. The intractability and uncertainty resulting from a suite of predictions may h...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change is affecting the distribution of marine species and is thought to represent a threat to biodiversity. Previous studies project expansion of species range for some species and local extinction elsewhere under climate change. Such range shifts raise concern for species whose long-term persistence is already threatened by other h...
Data
Difference in overlap between species. Difference in range overlap, (Schoener's D) as a percentage of the 1985 overlap value, between commercial species and a) Dipturus batis b) Squatina squatina. Thick bars represent median values, the upper and lower ends of the box the upper and lower quartiles of the data, and the whiskers the most extreme data...
Data
Differences in habitat suitability for threatened species in Hatton Bank. Difference in habitat suitability for the each of the six SDM/GCM combinations. Difference (2050 – 1985 values) in relative habitat suitability was calculated following standardization across all cSACs for each species and model. (TIF)
Data
Differences in habitat suitability for threatened species in Rockall. Difference in habitat suitability for the each of the six SDM/GCM combinations. Difference (2050 – 1985 values) in relative habitat suitability was calculated following standardization across all cSACs for each species and model. (TIF)
Data
Full-text available
Median difference in range overlap, (Schoener's D) as a percentage of the 1985 overlap value, between threatened and commercial species. Minimum, maximum and average overlap values are given for threatened species and average and overall median overlap values for commercial species. (PDF)
Data
Shifts in latitudinal centroid for threatened and commercial species. Projected change (in km) in latitudinal centroid from 1985 to 2050 using each of the six SDM and climatic dataset combinations, for both threatened species and commercial species. Thick bars represent median values, the upper and lower ends of the box the upper and lower quartile...
Data
Differences in habitat suitability for threatened species in the Dogger Bank. Difference in habitat suitability for the each of the six SDM/GCM combinations. Difference (2050 – 1985 values) in relative habitat suitability was calculated following standardization across all cSACs for each species and model. (TIF)
Data
Habitat Suitability values in 2000 and differences (2050 – 2000) for D. batis in all cSACs for each SDM/GCM combination. (PDF)
Article
1. Commercial fishing is an important socio-economic activity in coastal regions of the UK and Ireland. Ocean–atmospheric changes caused by greenhouse gas emissions are likely to affect future fish and shellfish production, and lead to increasing challenges in ensuring long-term sustainable fisheries management. 2. The paper reviews existing knowle...

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Projects (2)
Project
http://www.nereusprogram.org/ Who we are: The Nereus Program is a global interdisciplinary initiative created to further our knowledge of how best to attain sustainability for the world’s oceans. The Nereus Program, a collaboration between the Nippon Foundation and the University of British Columbia, has engaged in innovative, interdisciplinary ocean research since its inception in 2011. The Program is currently a global partnership of six leading marine science institutes with the aim of undertaking research that advances our comprehensive understandings of the global ocean systems across the natural and social sciences, from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. What we do: The Program is built around three core objectives: Research: conducting collaborative ocean research across the natural and social sciences Capacity building: developing a network of experts that can engage in discussion of complex and multifaceted questions of ocean sustainability Public outreach: transferring these ideas to practical solutions in global policy forums and public engagement Mission Statement: The Nereus Program strives to explore a broad range of perspectives and scientific opinions on ocean sustainability, and to create an inclusive community of researchers and other marine professionals. This principle is founded on the Nippon Foundation’s vision of global capacity building to ensure that our oceans’ legacy is preserved and potential is protected for future generations.