Miquel Santasusana Isach

Miquel Santasusana Isach
Barcelona School of Design and Engineering | ELISAVA · Faculty of Engineering

Doctor of Engineering in Structural Mechanics

About

8
Publications
2,152
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133
Citations
Featured research
Article
Full-text available
In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027–1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The contact problem where particles and solids are involved is of great interest in the industry with many possible applications. One of these applications is the contact of tires on a particulate soil with gravel or sand; in this case, the Finite Element Method is used for the solution of the solids while the Discrete Element Method turns to be a powerful tool to simulate the particles and inspect the effects of the contact i.e. the deformation suffered by the tire or the wear due to friction. In many simulations the granular media are modelled with the classical DEM with spheres which are the cheapest and most efficient element for simulating a large amount of particles. However, in many cases the effects of the particle geometry are important in the behaviour of the particles as a bulk or as individuals. The use of clusters is chosen in this case which provides great balance between shape accuracy and efficiency in terms of computational cost. Furthermore, it is the most versatile method in terms of particle shape and can naturally include angularities. The particles presented here simulate stones treated as rigid bodies which contact detection and characterization is solved element-wise with a sphere discretization of the surface or the interior of each cluster.
Article
The discrete element method (DEM) is an emerging tool for the calculation of the behaviour of bulk materials. One of the key features of this method is the explicit integration of the motion equations. Explicit methods are rapid, at the cost of a limited time step to achieve numerical stability. First- or second-order integration schemes based on a Taylor series are frequently used in this framework and shown to be accurate for the translational and rotational motion of spherical particles. However, they may lead to relevant inaccuracies when non-spherical particles are used since the orientation implies a modification in the second-order inertia tensor in the inertial reference frame. Specific integration schemes for non-spherical particles have been proposed in the literature, such as the fourth-order Runge–Kutta scheme presented by Munjiza et al. and the predictor–corrector scheme developed by Zhao and van Wachem which applies the direct multiplication algorithm for integrating the orientation. In this work, both methods are adapted to be used together with a velocity Verlet scheme for the translational integration. The performance of the resulting schemes, as well as that of the direct integration method, is assessed, both in benchmark tests with analytical solution and in real-scale problems. The results suggest that the fourth-order Runge–Kutta and the Zhao and van Wachem schemes are clearly more accurate than the direct integration method without increasing the computational time.
Chapter
In this chapter we present recent advances on the Discrete Element Method (DEM) and on the coupling of the DEM with the Finite Element Method (FEM) for solving a variety of problems in non linear solid mechanics involving damage, plasticity and multifracture situations.
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
Barcelona School of Design and Engineering
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Classical Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials professor
January 2015 - June 2015
Leibniz Universität Hannover
Position
  • Guest Researcher
September 2013 - September 2016
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
The discrete element method (DEM) is an emerging tool for the calculation of the behaviour of bulk materials. One of the key features of this method is the explicit integration of the motion equations. Explicit methods are rapid, at the cost of a limited time step to achieve numerical stability. First- or second-order integration schemes based on a...
Chapter
In this chapter we present recent advances on the Discrete Element Method (DEM) and on the coupling of the DEM with the Finite Element Method (FEM) for solving a variety of problems in non linear solid mechanics involving damage, plasticity and multifracture situations.
Article
Full-text available
In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculat...
Article
This paper presents a local constitutive model for modelling the linear and non linear behavior of soft and hard cohesive materials with the discrete element method (DEM). We present the results obtained in the analysis with the DEM of cylindrical samples of cement, concrete and shale rock materials under a uniaxial compressive strength test, diffe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The contact problem where particles and solids are involved is of great interest in the industry with many possible applications. One of these applications is the contact of tires on a particulate soil with gravel or sand; in this case, the Finite Element Method is used for the solution of the solids while the Discrete Element Method turns to be a...

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