Minoru Yoneda

Minoru Yoneda
The University of Tokyo | Todai · The University Museum

Doctor of Philosophy

About

185
Publications
36,908
Reads
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3,412
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - present
The University of Tokyo
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • Head of Laboratory for Radiocarbon Dating
April 2006 - March 2012
The University of Tokyo
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
February 2003 - February 2005
University of Oxford
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Sponsored by JSPS Overseas Research Fellowship
Education
April 1994 - March 1995
The University of Tokyo
Field of study
  • Physical Anthropology
April 1992 - March 1994
The University of Tokyo
Field of study
  • Physical Anthropology
April 1988 - March 1992
The University of Tokyo
Field of study
  • Physical Anthropology

Publications

Publications (185)
Article
Full-text available
Significance We studied goose bones from Tianluoshan—a 7,000-y-old rice cultivation village in the lower Yangtze River valley, China—using histological, geochemical, biochemical, and morphological approaches. Our analyses reveal an early stage of goose domestication at Tianluoshan. The goose population seemed to have been maintained for several gen...
Article
Full-text available
At Aşıklı Höyük, one of the earliest Pre-pottery Neolithic mound sites in Central Anatolia, a shift in animal utilization from broad-spectrum exploitation of diverse animal species to a concentration on managed caprines has been observed. Changes in the balance of meat to plant foods over the same time frame remain an open question. In this study,...
Article
Stable isotope analysis is one of the most effective methods of reconstructing human fishing practices and changes in past marine ecosystems. The effectiveness of this method can be further improved when considering diachronic changes in stable isotope ratios of archaeological remains of several different fish species that exhibit different behavio...
Article
Full-text available
The origin and early dispersal of speakers of Transeurasian languages—that is, Japanese, Korean, Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic—is among the most disputed issues of Eurasian population history. A key problem is the relationship between linguistic dispersals, agricultural expansions and population movements4,5. Here we address this question by ‘trian...
Article
Radionuclides produced by 20th-century human nuclear activities from 1945 (e.g., atmospheric nuclear explosions and nuclear-fuel reprocessing) made significant impacts on earth's surface environments. Long-lived shallow-water corals living in tropical/subtropical seas incorporate the anthropogenically-produced radionuclides, including ¹²⁹I and ¹⁴C,...
Article
Full-text available
This dataset consists of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bulk collagen extracted from 229 human skeletons from premodern Japan. All samples were derived from different individuals excavated from mainland Japan and the Ryukyu Islands. Most of the skeletal individuals were identified, sexed, and aged by physical anthropologists. Collagen...
Article
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Recent studies on paleogenomics have reported some Paleolithic and Neolithic genomes that have provided new insights into the human population history in East and Northeast Asia. However, there remain some cases where more recent migration events need to be examined to elucidate the detailed formation process of local populations. Although the area...
Article
Modern shark attacks are uncommon and archaeological examples are even rarer, with the oldest previously known case dating to ca. AD 1000. Here we report a shark attack on an adult male radiocarbon dated to 1370–1010 cal BC during the fisher-hunter-gatherer Jo ̄mon period of the Japanese archipelago. The individual was buried at the Tsukumo site ne...
Article
In this study, we analyzed the carbonized residue adhering to the inner surface of pottery excavated at the Hyakunincho 3-chome Nishi site, Tokyo, Japan. We examined the chronological position of the linear relief pottery group at the beginning of the Incipient Jomon period, which is the earliest pottery stage in the history of the Japanese archipe...
Article
The Ongamira Valley (Córdoba, Argentina) shows a persistent occupational history of its territory. Even one of the first Argentinian radiocarbon ( ¹⁴ C) dates was calculated in this valley; for 70 years, the chronology was based on relative dates (stratigraphy and its cultural content). For this reason, since 2010 a ¹⁴ C dating program has been dev...
Article
Full-text available
The origins and development of rice cultivation are one of the most important aspects in studying agricultural and socio-economic innovations, as well as environmental change, in East Asian prehistory. In particular, whether wet or dry rice cultivation was conducted is an important consideration of its impact on societies and the environment across...
Article
The improved fluorine analysis method by ion chromatography was applied to the fossil human bones excavated from the Shiraho‐Saonetabaru Cave site on Ishigaki Island, which were dated back to the Late Pleistocene. This study presents the first systematic results on individual variation of F/P ratios of fossil bones using less than 1 mg samples. In...
Preprint
Full-text available
The origin and early dispersal of speakers of Transeurasian languages, i.e., Japanese, Korean, Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic, is among the most disputed issues of Eurasian population history. A key problem is the relationship between linguistic dispersals, agricultural expansions and population movements. Here we address this question through ‘tria...
Article
Maize (Zea mays) was an important staple and ceremonial food in the pre-Columbian Andean world. Previous researchers have studied maize agriculture in early ancient Andean society by examining macro- and microbotanical remains. However, isotope analyses of human remains have shown that maize was not a primary food resource during the Formative Peri...
Chapter
In Japan, the populations of most urbanized cities decreased during the middle to late premodern period (eighteenth–nineteenth century). The cities of Osaka and Kyoto experienced major population decreases, one of the causes of which is assumed to be the persistently high proportion of live-in servants present. Historical demographic analyses indic...
Article
We examined fragmentary human skeletal remains from Escalon Cave near Surigao City, northeastern Mindanao, the Philippines, with respect to the morphology of bones and teeth, radiocarbon dating, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup. These remains contained parts of the left temporal bone, the right humerus, the right femur, the upper right firs...
Article
The identification of which food sources were important to the diets of Central Asian populations during the Bronze and Iron Age has been heavily debated over the past decade. Stable isotope studies of human bulk collagen have often reported elevated nitrogen isotopic compositions (δ¹⁵N) that were more than one step higher in the food chain than co...
Article
Full-text available
Anatomically modern humans reached East Asia more than 40,000 years ago. However, key questions still remain unanswered with regard to the route(s) and the number of wave(s) in the dispersal into East Eurasia. Ancient genomes at the edge of the region may elucidate a more detailed picture of the peopling of East Eurasia. Here, we analyze the whole-...
Article
This study proposes a new method to detect changes of altitudinal distribution limit of a plant species based on the stomatal analysis of fossilized leaves. We use the Holocene fossil leaves of Fagus crenata (Japanese beech), a dominant deciduous tree in the cool temperate zone, from different horizons in a peat bog in Mt. Kurikoma, north Japan. Re...
Article
Maritime migration and island adaptation by anatomically modern humans (AMH) are among the most significant issues in Southeast Asian anthropology and archaeology, and directly related to their behavioural and technological advancements. A major research hotspot is Wallacean islands located between the past Sunda and Sahul continents during the lat...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we carry out an isotopic study to learn about the diet and mobility patterns of the human groups that inhabited different areas and environments of western Catamarca, Argentina, over almost 2500 years. We present and discuss the results of the isotopic composition of 26 bioarchaeological remains (δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N on bone collagen, and δ...
Article
Objectives: A change in how children were treated and valued occurred in premodern Japan, as popularized ideas of an inheritance-based family system led to more careful and affectionate child-rearing practices by lower social-status groups. A number of books were written, advising that breastfeeding should last approximately 3 years. The objective...
Article
Full-text available
The excavation of the Shomyoji shell midden in 2017 recovered more than 26 human skeletal remains belonging to the Jomon, Kofun, and Heian periods. In this paper, we describe one Heian-period (AD 794–1185) individual (SK1), who was dated to 957–900 calBP by radiocarbon dating. SK1 is well preserved, presumably a male, and aged approximately 20–35 y...
Article
Variation in arsenolipid concentrations was assessed in 18 seafood samples including fish, shellfish, and crustaceans purchased in Japan. Analyses were performed by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Stable isotope ratios for nitrogen and carbon were...
Article
Full-text available
The reconstruction of everyday diets in villages is important for understanding the diversity of diets and commerce networks of food items in premodern Japan. However, premodern diets in villages have not been well studied compared with those in cities. In this study, stable isotope analyses were performed on 23 adult human skeletons excavated from...
Article
This short article report about the new findings of finely made dentate-stamped and lime infilled potteries from the Goa Topogaro site in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Most of them are red-slipped pottery decorated with dentate-stamped, lime infilled, and can be identified as burial potteries as they are excavated with secondly burials of the Early...
Article
Human-made structures and shaped stones on the seafloor near coasts, possibly submerged by tsunami waves, coseismic subsidence, or flooding during typhoons, can often be linked to folk traditions of ancient natural disasters. Stone pillars that appear to have been artificially shaped are submerged in shallow waters inshore Tosashimizu city, southea...
Article
The Amida Hall located on the grounds of Yuten-ji Temple in Tokyo’s Meguro Ward is said to have been donated by Take-hime, the adopted daughter of Tsunayoshi, the fifth Tokugawa Shogun, in 1724 as a ward against evil. Temple records support this and also state that a stone box containing the hair of Take-hime was buried under the floor beneath the...
Article
Recent studies have revealed that the Jomon people are considerably genetically different from any other population, including modern-day Japanese. This gives rise to an intriguing question: when after the Jomon era did this drastic change of genetic features occur? The Shomyoji shell midden site in Kanagawa, Japan can provide some clues to address...
Article
Rationale: Foodcrust, the charred deposit adhering to the surface of containers, is a possible source of information on the function of ancient vessels and the subsistence of prehistoric humans. While the carbon isotope ratios in those materials are useful in detecting the usage of C4 plants, the reliability of nitrogen isotopic signatures has not...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anatomical modern humans reached East Asia by >40,000 years ago (kya). However, key questions still remain elusive with regard to the route(s) and the number of wave(s) in the dispersal into East Eurasia. Ancient genomes at the edge of East Eurasia may shed light on the detail picture of peopling to East Eurasia. Here, we analyze the whole-genome s...
Article
Camelids were domesticated in the Andean highlands, such as in the puna habitat, and dispersed into lowland areas and the northern Central Andes. As camelids domesticated in a particular region would have had a greater economic benefit than visiting- or hunted wild camelids, it is important to reconstruct the dispersal of camelid husbandry from its...
Article
The earliest evidence of human tuberculosis can be traced to at least the early dynastic periods, when full-scaled wet-rice agriculture began or entered its early developmental stages, in circum-China countries (Japan, Korea, and Thailand). Early studies indicated that the initial spread of tuberculosis coincided with the development of wet-rice ag...
Article
Full-text available
Objective The inhabitants of several sites in the Upper Tigris Valley, such as Hakemi Use, domesticated animals and cereals during the Pottery Neolithic period, while the inhabitants in this valley were hunter–gatherers in the Pre‐Pottery Neolithic period, consuming freshwater and terrestrial food resources. However, there is considerable uncertain...
Article
Full-text available
A new excavation of the Iyai rock-shelter site has uncovered more than a dozen human skeletal remains from the Initial Jomon period. We describe here an almost complete female skeleton (Iyai 1), and examine this in the context of morphological variation in Jomon females, especially those of the Initial Jomon period. Two radiocarbon dates based on t...
Article
We have improved a method for isolation and purification of individual amino acids for compound-specific radiocarbon analysis (CSRA). To remove high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) eluent blanks from isolated amino acid fractions prior to the radiocarbon (Δ14C) measurement, each fraction was filtered through a membrane filter and then wash...
Article
Gelatin extracted from archaeological fish bones typically exhibits relatively high C/N ratios, presumed to be caused by contamination with lipids or humic substances. The effects of lipid extraction and different collagen extraction methods applied has been studied on modern fish bones but has never been studied systematically on archaeological sp...
Article
New evidence from the rockshelter site of Aru Manara, on the island of Morotai, in the northern Moluccas, East Indonesia, suggests an earlier than previously assumed date for extensive interactions between this area of Southeast Asia and the wider Pacific. Shared mortuary customs and associated ceramic grave goods, along with other practices such a...
Article
Objectives Holocene hunter‐gatherers adapted to climatic and environmental changes over time. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of human skeletal remains from the Inariyama shell mound of the Final Jomon period have revealed large dietary variations in the population. This study analyzed radiocarbon dates of these individuals to test temp...
Article
Full-text available
The human occupation history of Southeast Asia (SEA) remains heavily debated. Current evidence suggests that SEA was occupied by Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers until ~4000 years ago, when farming economies developed and expanded, restricting foraging groups to remote habitats. Some argue that agricultural development was indigenous; others favor the “...
Article
The sediments of Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, consist of bioclastic materials, including foraminifera and coral debris. The sedimentary depth profiles of elements showed that various elements including zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) were enriched in the upper layers of the islands of Majuro Atoll. Carbon-14 dating revealed that the sedimentation of t...
Article
We report here stable nitrogen isotope values of amino acids and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of collagen in human (n = 18) and faunal remains from Tell el-Kerkh, which was a large settlement in the northern Levant during the Neolithic period. A unique outdoor communal cemetery involving > 240 individual burials was found in the Potter...
Chapter
This paper presents a computer-based method to estimate optimal migration routes of early human population groups by a combination of ecological niche analysis and least-cost path analysis. In the proposed method, niche probability is predicted by MaxEnt, an ecological niche model based on the maximum entropy theory. Location of known archaeologica...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the relationship between Late Epipaleolithic evidence recovered at Dederiyeh Cave in Northwest Syria and the Natufian cultural entity from a cultural-historical perspective. The radiocarbon dates indicate that Dederiyeh occupation dates from at least the late 15 th and the 14 th millennia BP, with the possibility that it encomp...
Article
In this paper we discuss the results of excavation at the Aru Manara site in the Northern Maluku islands along with a description of the recovered pottery assemblage and results of compositional analysis of glass ornaments. By comparing our data to those from other sites in the area, we suggest the possible development of regional maritime networks...
Article
Bone collagen was extracted from a series of Jomon skeletons from Iwashita Cave in Sasebo City, Nagasaki, Japan, which were excavated in 1964–1966 seasons. The radiocarbon dates on 5 skeletons from Layer V showed calibrated dates between 9000 and 10000 cal B.P. corresponding to the Initial (Earliest) Jomon period. The stable carbon and nitrogen iso...
Article
We report here the stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ¹⁵N) of individual amino acids and the δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C content of collagen from human and faunal remains collected from Hasankeyf Höyük, an early Neolithic site in the upper Tigris valley. Based on the δ¹⁵N of collagen only, the contributions of freshwater resources to the diet of the hunter-ga...
Article
Stable isotope analysis of collagen extracted from ancient bones has become a routine exercise. Collagen can be extracted from either bone powder or chunks, but little research has compared these two procedures in detail. In this study, yield, elemental concentration, and carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of gelatin extracted from bone powd...
Article
Jomon hunter–gatherers in Japan commonly show Neolithic characteristics, such as intensive utilization of potteries, grinding stones, and many plant food sources. In this study, breastfeeding and weaning practices in a Jomon hunter–gatherer population are investigated to evaluate two hypotheses concerning the relations between utilization of potter...
Article
Full-text available
The life history of a female individual skeleton (ST61) from the Edo period (AD 1603–1868) was investigated by using multi-tissue and multi-isotope analyses. Her gravestone and historical documents revealed that ST61 was a grandmother of a chief retainer of the Akashi clan who died in 1732 aged 77 years. Radiocarbon and sulfur stable isotope analys...
Article
Rationale: Estimation of the stable isotopic offsets between tissue and diet is important for dietary reconstructions. Although stable isotopic studies of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are increasing, the isotopic offsets in chimpanzees have never been studied. In this study, the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic offset values in hair and feces...
Article
The globalization of food production and distribution has homogenized human dietary patterns irrespective of geography, but it is uncertain how far this homogenization has progressed. This study investigated the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in the scalp hair of 1305 contemporary Japanese and found values of −19.4 ± 0.6‰ and 9.4 ± 0.6‰ (mean ±...
Article
Full-text available
The Jomon period of the Japanese Archipelago, characterized by cord-marked 'jomon' potteries, has yielded abundant human skeletal remains. However, the genetic origins of the Jomon people and their relationships with modern populations have not been clarified. We determined a total of 115 million base pair nuclear genome sequences from two Jomon in...
Article
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It has been hypothesized that nitrogen fixation occurs in the human gut. However, whether the gut microbiota truly has this potential remains unclear. We investigated the nitrogen-fixing activity and diversity of the nitrogenase reductase (NifH) genes in the faecal microbiota of humans, focusing on Papua New Guinean and Japanese individuals with lo...
Article
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We present the oldest human skeletal case yet identified with possible SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis), a chronic disease involving the skin, bone, and joints. A human skeleton with a severe pathological condition was recovered from a shell mound of the prehistoric Okhotsk culture at the Hamanaka 2 site, Rebun I...
Article
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Morphological and biochemical approaches were performed on the five human remains (No. 1: middle adult male, No. 2: fetus or neonatal, No. 3: young or middle adult female, No. 4: middle adult female, and No. 5: infant) excavated from the Nonomae Shellmound, Ofunato City, Iwate Prefecture. Based on the results of direct radiocarbon dating, these hum...
Article
Stable isotope analysis has undergone rapid development in recent years and yielded significant results in the field of forensic sciences. In particular, carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios in tooth enamel obtained from human remains can provide useful information for the crosschecking of morphological and DNA analyses and facilitate rapid on-site pr...
Article
Full-text available
Individual dietary differences (e.g. sex, age, period, and region) among townspeople during the Edo period are unclear, although the historical literature describes the general dietary menu. We applied carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses to 103 adult human skeletons excavated from the Ikenohata­Shichikencho site of the Edo period (late 17th...