Mingjing Cai

Mingjing Cai
The Chinese University of Hong Kong | CUHK · Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
7,340
Reads
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399
Citations
Citations since 2017
9 Research Items
369 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Human kinectic energy harvesting, self-powered IoT applications
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - July 2020
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2013 - April 2016
South China University of Technology
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Energy harvesting from human motion has great potential of sustainably powering Internet of Things (IoT) sensors and satisfying their continuous sensing requirement. In this article, we propose a high-performance wrist-worn energy harvester to efficiently capture the biomechanical energy of arm swinging to self-power wearable sensors. Based on coax...
Article
In this article, we investigated an embedded energy harvester to translate the kinetic energy of arm swing into electricity for powering smart watch and wristband. The embedded energy harvester integrates coaxially arranged motion capture unit, magnetic frequency-up converter, and electromagnetic transducer-based power generation unit to achieve hi...
Article
Full-text available
The development of wearable electronics and sensors is constrained by the limited capacity of their batteries. Therefore, energy harvesting from human motion is explored to provide a promising embedded sustainable power supply for wearable devices. Herein, the principles, development, and applications of human motion excited energy harvesters are r...
Article
Inertial energy harvesters have great potential to sustainably power wearable sensors for the Internet of Things. However, the bulky proof mass used to capture kinetic energy limits the power density of such an energy harvester. Targeted for high-power density, we propose an inertial energy harvester without additional proof mass to efficiently sca...
Article
Smart watches and wristbands are demonstrating great potential in industries such as health monitoring, sports training and entertainment. However, the limited battery life of these devices remains a key issue. We report an electromagnetic generator with coaxial topology that efficiently captures the motion of arm swing to produce electricity for s...
Article
Scavenging energy from human motion is a potential way to meet the increasing requirement of electrical power supply for portable electronics. However, since the conventional energy harvesters may collect both positive and negative work, the users have to pay extra efforts. This work aims at developing a smart energy harvester to accurately identif...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to develop an in-shoe magnetic harvester that could be embedded in a shoe to scavenge mechanical energy from human foot strike for conversion into electricity, thereby serving as a sustainable power source for portable or wearable electronic devices. The allowed displacement of the shoe heel in the vertical direction was e...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, a harvesting device embedded into a suspended backpack was developed to harness part of a human's biomechanical energy and reduce dynamic force of the backpack on the carrier. The harvester utilized a spring mass damping system to translate the human body's vertical movement during walking into the rotation of a gear train, which the...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we propose a piezoelectric energy harvester to scavenge the impact energy from human footsteps at low input frequencies. The device consists of an amplification mechanism and piezoelectric bimorphs. When a human foot strikes the proposed harvester, the amplification mechanism deforms the piezoelectric bimorphs in the 31-mode to produ...
Article
Full-text available
With the rapid development of wearable computing systems, portable power sources have become an important concern for the convenient and long-lasting use of these systems. Two wearable harvesters that harness kinetic energy from human motion were developed to provide sustainable power levels for wearable computing systems. The experiments showed th...

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