Mimi Kessler

Mimi Kessler
Eurasian Bustard Alliance

8.02
 · 
PhD - Biology

About

15
Publications
3,366
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31
Citations
Introduction
I founded and direct the Eurasian Bustard Alliance and serve as the North Eurasian Bustard Coordinator for the IUCN Bustard Specialist Group. I carry out scientific research into the ecology of bustard species, and develop policies for their conservation.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Accounting for within-species variability in the relationship between occurrence and climate is essential to forecasting species’ responses to climate change. Few climate-vulnerability assessments explicitly consider intraspecific variation, and those that do typically assume that variability is best explained by genetic affinity. Here, we evaluate...
Article
Full-text available
The Great Bustard is the heaviest bird capable of flight and an iconic species of the Eurasian steppe. Populations of both currently recognized subspecies are highly fragmented and critically small in Asia. We used DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and the mitochondrial control region to estimate the degree of mitochondrial...
Article
Full-text available
The inherent defencelessness against natural predators of bustards, which have relatively small bills and can neither perch in trees nor take refuge in water at night, renders them warier than other large-bodied birds. They are therefore dependent on large areas of little-disturbed, little-developed open country within which they can see and keep d...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Proposal to list the global population of Great Bustard on Appendix I, submitted by the Government of Mongolia to the Convention on Migratory Species in 2014
Article
Full-text available
Great Bustards were once familiar inhabitants of the steppe zones of Central Asia. Today , remnant populations are small and isolated, and the species is red-listed across this portion of its range. We review what is known about the historical status of the Great Bustard in Central Asia and the species' migratory patterns in this region. We also di...
Article
Full-text available
The range of the great bustard stretches 10 000 km across Eurasia, one of the largest ranges of any threatened species. While movement patterns of the western subspecies of great bustard are relatively well-understood, this is the first research to monitor the movements of the more endangered Asian subspecies of great bustard through telemetry and...

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