Milos Popovic

Milos Popovic
Leiden University | LEI · Faculty of Social Science

PhD

About

16
Publications
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71
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Introduction
I'm a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. I'm teaching MA courses on conflict and security at ASU's Center on the Future of War. Previously, I worked as a Consultant on the Minerva Project led by prof. Robert Jervis that examines the role of culture in the Sino-American rivalry. I've also worked as a Visiting Lecturer in the Department of International Relations at Central European University (CEU), where I taught qualitative research design and methods for M.A. students. My interests are in proxy wars, cohesion and fragmentation of militant groups, violence in civil conflicts, and ethnic conflict in the Balkans.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
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This forum provides an outlet for an assessment of research on the delegation of war to non-state armed groups in civil wars. Given the significant growth of studies concerned with this phenomenon over the last decade, this forum critically engages with the present state of the field. First, we canvass some of the most important theoretical develop...
Article
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Islamic law denotes as haram any forbidden behavior, object, beverage, or food. Despite subscribing to a similar Salafi ideology, very few jihadi groups use violence against haram targets (e.g., brothels, casinos, statues, liquor stores, mixed sex schools, and gay clubs). This study argues that haram-centered violence unites ethnically-mixed jihadi...
Article
Recognition of aspiring states from established countries is central to becoming a member state of the international system. Previous research suggests that great power recognition decisions regarding aspiring states rapidly converge toward either recognition or non-recognition, yet great power convergence has still not occurred in the case of Koso...
Article
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Major powers have long used cultural institutes to enhance their appeal in foreign countries. As aspirant powers, Russia and China have recently launched cultural institutes of their own with the aim of improving their international reputations. However, the location and operations of the Confucius Institutes and Russkiy Mir Institutes often seem t...
Article
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From the Patriotic Front struggle against the minority rule in Rhodesia to the seven-party mujaheddin alliance in Afghanistan, inter-rebel alliances make the armed opposition more resilient and successful in the face of government repression. Why then do some rebel groups cooperate with each other while others do not? Drawing on the principal-agent...
Chapter
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In their seminal study “Resort to Arms,” Small and Singer (1982) defined a civil war as “any armed conflict that involves (a) military action internal to the metropole, (b) the active participation of the national government, and (c) effective resistance by both sides.” Internationalized civil wars constitute a newer classification, denoting a conf...
Article
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This paper introduces a spatial model of civil conflict management rhetoric to explore how the emerging norm of responsibility to protect shapes major power rhetorical responses to civil war. Using framing theory, we argue that responsibility to protect functions like a prescriptive norm, such that representing a conflict as one of (1) human rights...
Article
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Foreign governments frequently intervene in armed conflicts by sponsoring rebels against their adversaries. A sponsorship is less costly than a direct military intervention, but rebels often defy orders, desert fighting, or turn guns against their sponsors. Under what conditions do rebels defect against their sponsors? Drawing on organizational the...
Data
This dataset is composed of state sponsor-rebel group dyads and covers externalized intra-state armed conflicts where a foreign power provided lethal or non-lethal support for insurgency. There are are 188 such dyads nested within 108 conflicts for the years 1968-2012. There are 188 such dyads nested within 108 conflicts. Since the focus is on spon...
Article
Full-text available
Why do some militant groups defect against their sponsors, while others remain loyal? Pakistan's sponsorship of Jaish-e-Mohammad and Lashkar-e-Taiba offers a controlled case comparison as the former turned its guns against Islamabad, while the latter remained obedient despite a similar strength, ethnic ties to the regime, and the presence of altern...

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Project - ICOW Project
Question
Erin Jenne and I are working on a paper and would like to use your variable measuring identity claims.

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