Miko M. Wilford

Miko M. Wilford
University of Massachusetts Lowell | UML · Department of Psychology

Psychology, Ph.D.

About

26
Publications
11,450
Reads
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395
Citations
Introduction
I am a tenured Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. My research interests involve applying social-cognition to law and education. I received my Ph.D. at Iowa State University under co-Major Professors Gary L. Wells and Jason C. K. Chan, and with the support of a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. Prior to beginning graduate school, I graduated Magna Cum Laude with Honors earning a B.S. in Psychology and a B.A. in Political Science with a minor in Applied Statistics.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
University of Massachusetts Lowell
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2014 - present
University of Massachusetts Lowell
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Cognitive Psychology (47.278)
May 2012 - July 2012
Iowa State University
Position
  • Graduate Instructor
Description
  • Introduction to Psychology (101)
Education
August 2012 - June 2014
Iowa State University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2009 - March 2012
Iowa State University
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2005 - May 2009
Iowa State University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Immediately recalling a witnessed event can increase people's susceptibility to later postevent misinformation. But this retrieval-enhanced suggestibility (RES) effect has been shown only when the initial recall test included specific questions that reappeared on the final test. Moreover, it is unclear whether this phenomenon is affected by the cen...
Article
Full-text available
There is broad consensus among researchers both that faces are processed more holistically than other objects and that this type of processing is beneficial. We predicted that holistic processing of faces also involves a cost, namely, a diminished ability to localize change. This study (N = 150) utilized a modified change-blindness paradigm in whic...
Article
Full-text available
The present study explored the effects of lecture fluency on students' metacognitive awareness and regulation. Participants watched one of two short videos of an instructor explaining a scientific concept. In the fluent video, the instructor stood upright, maintained eye contact, and spoke fluidly without notes. In the disfluent video, the instruct...
Article
Full-text available
America’s founding fathers believed jury trials to be a critical component of an orderly democracy. Yet, fewer than 5% of America’s cases are decided by juries. We present an interdisciplinary review of empirical, legal, and historical literatures to highlight the significance of the disappearing trial. Without juries, direct participation in the j...
Article
Full-text available
Over 95% of criminal convictions in the United States are the result of guilty pleas. Consequently, it is critical that we ensure the process of pleading guilty is as free of coercion as possible. Yet, research has indicated that incarcerating defendants to await trial could have an undue influence on their decision to plead guilty. The current res...
Article
Full-text available
Interpolated testing can reduce mind-wandering and proactive interference, and improve note-taking. However, recent research using face-name-profession triads, has also shown that interpolated testing can impair new learning (Davis, Chan, & Wilford, 2017). In the current study, we further examined the impact of switching from testing to new learnin...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the prevalence of guilty pleas, we know relatively little about factors that influence the decision to plead. Replicating and extending Dervan and Edkins’ Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, 103, 1-48. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2071397, (2013), we conducted two experiments to examine the effects of guilt status, trial penalty, and c...
Article
Full-text available
The way in which information is presented can influence students’ judgments of learning (JOLs). Carpenter, Wilford, Kornell, and Mullaney (2013), found that students reported higher JOLs after viewing a fluent lecturer (good speaker) versus a disfluent lecturer, whereas actual learning performance was unaffected by lecturer fluency. The current res...
Article
Full-text available
Defendants facing felony prosecutions often avoid trial by pleading guilty. Sexual offense cases reach plea dispositions less frequently, though pleas are still common. Public opinion has held that sex offenders are treated too leniently by the justice system. However, limited research on sex offender pleas has not supported these perceptions. The...
Article
Full-text available
We examined how giving eyewitnesses a weak recognition experience impacts their identification decisions. In 2 experiments we forced a weak recognition experience for lineups by impairing either encoding or retrieval conditions. In Experiment 1 (n = 245), undergraduate participants were randomly assigned to watch either a clear or a degraded culpri...
Chapter
Full-text available
The year 2016 produced a record number of exoneration cases involving guilty pleas (National Registry of Exonerations, 2017). Nonetheless, guilty pleas account for a minority of overall exonerations in the National Registry. This chapter provides a broad overview of false guilty pleas, including what they are and why they can be so difficult to doc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Defendants facing felony prosecutions often avoid trial by pleading guilty. Sexual offense cases reach plea dispositions less frequently, though pleas are still common. Public opinion has held that sex offenders are treated too leniently by the justice system. However, limited research on sex offender pleas has not supported these perceptions. The...
Preprint
Full-text available
Guilty pleas have received little research attention relative to other areas of psycho-legal study. In an effort to remedy this scarcity we designed a computer simulation of a plea-bargaining scenario: it was designed to be more ecologically valid than a vignette, but less resource-demanding than a high-stakes deception study. The results indicate...
Article
Full-text available
The United States convicts over 1 million people of felonies each year without affording the resources of a trial. Instead, these convictions are attained by guilty plea. The current research investigated the similarities and differences that would emerge between pleas and confessions when relying on a paradigm originally developed for confession r...
Article
Full-text available
Introduces this special section of Psychology, Public Policy, and Law on the topic of guilty pleas. In this special section the editors have assembled six rigorous research and analytical papers that deepen the understanding of guilty pleas and introduce a number of important policy implications. Together, these studies examined the impact of multi...
Article
Full-text available
The adjudication of crime by guilty plea has been on the rise globally for at least the last 30 years. Few countries, however, have accepted pleas to the degree of the United States, whose highest court recently acknowledged a criminal justice system near-synonymous with a "system of pleas, not a system of trials" (Lafler v. Cooper, 2012, p. 3). Th...
Article
Full-text available
Practicing retrieval can improve the updating or modification of existing knowledge. When students need to update their existing knowledge, performing retrieval practice on the first set of materials often strengthens learning of the next set. However, reported that interpolated testing can sometimes impair new learning. Here, we examined whether f...
Article
Full-text available
Suspects accused of involvement in the same crime can be tried in one multiple-defendant trial. While research has long demonstrated the difficulties of being a juror, no published work has examined whether multiple-defendant trials compound these difficulties. The current research recruited both student and community samples to determine whether t...
Article
Full-text available
Taking an immediate recall test prior to misinformation exposure can increase eyewitness suggestibility-a finding termed retrieval-enhanced suggestibility. Here, we examined whether retrieval-enhanced suggestibility would occur when participants were administered an immediate Cognitive Interview (CI). The CI is an investigative interviewing techniq...
Article
Full-text available
Taking an intervening test between learning episodes can enhance later source recollec- tion. Paradoxically, testing can also increase people’s susceptibility to the misinformation effect – a finding termed retrieval-enhanced suggestibility (RES, Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). We conducted three experiments to examine this apparent contradiction....

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