Miklós Bán

Miklós Bán
University of Debrecen · Department of Evolutionary Zoology and Human Biology

Ph.D.

About

44
Publications
13,480
Reads
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923
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
554 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
Biologist: interested in behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology and brood parasitism. Software developer: interested in scientific software engineering, conservation related software engineering. OpenBioMaps. https://gitlab.com/OpenBioMaps https://github.com/EvoZooDeb https://github.com/miklosban
Additional affiliations
January 2005 - present
University of Debrecen
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2005 - present
University of Debrecen
Position
  • Various
Description
  • Human evolution Field research methodology Biological databases Evolutionary psycholology Linux for biologists Zoology: birds

Publications

Publications (44)
Preprint
Full-text available
Civilisations including ancient ones, have shaped the global ecosystems in many ways through a co-evolution of landscapes and humans. However, the cultural legacies of ancient and lost civilisations are seldom considered in conservation. Here using a continental-scale dataset containing over 1,000 data records on the localities, land cover, protect...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity related observational data are collected in a variety of ways and for a variety of purposes, mostly in the form of some sort of organised data collection action. Data management solutions are often developed to manage the data collection processes and organise the data, which may work well on their own but are less compatible with othe...
Article
Full-text available
The brood parasitic Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus is best known for its two-note "cu-coo" call which is almost continuously uttered by male during the breeding season and can be heard across long distances in the field. Although the informative value of the cuckoo call was intensively investigated recently, it is still not clear whether call charac...
Article
To avoid mobbing attacks by their hosts during egg laying, some avian brood parasites have evolved traits to visually and/or acoustically resemble predator(s) of their hosts. Prior work established that reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus), a small host species of the brood parasitic common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), delayed returning to the nest...
Article
Eurasian steppes have an outstanding role in conserving grassland biodiversity. However, due to the large-scale landscape transformation during the past centuries in many regions stands of dry grassland habitats have been conserved only in the form of small terrestrial habitat islands. Such habitat islands are often present on the ancient burial mo...
Article
Full-text available
Female-only colour polymorphism is rare in birds, but occurs in brood parasitic cuckoos (Cuculidae). Obligate brood parasites leave incubation and parental care to other species (hosts), so female-female interactions can play a role in how parasites guard critical resources (host nests) within their laying areas. The plumage of adult female common...
Article
Full-text available
Az eurázsiai sztyeppék kiemelkedő szerepet játszanak a biodiverzitás megőrzésében, azonban az elmúlt századokban tapasztalható élőhelypusztulás következtében sok esetben csak kis kiterjedésű refúgiumokban maradtak fent. Ilyen refúgiumok az ősi sztyeppi temetkezési halmok (halomsírok, más néven kurgánok), melyek nem csupán kulturális és történelmi,...
Article
Full-text available
It is well known that avian brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, called hosts. It remains less clear, however, just how parasites are able to recognize their hosts and identify the exact location of the appropriate nests to lay their eggs in. While previous studies attributed high importance to visual signals in findin...
Article
Full-text available
Eurasian steppes have an essential role in conserving biodiversity, but due to the huge habitat loss in the past centuries they are often preserved only in small refuges. Among such refuges are the ancient steppic burial mounds (the so called 'kurgans') which have a high cultural and historical importance and are also essential sites of nature cons...
Article
Full-text available
Obligate brood parasitic birds have evolved a rare avian strategy for reproduction by laying eggs in the nests of other species. In doing so, their breeding ranges, but not necessarily their foraging habitats, have become intimately related to the nesting territories of their hosts. We studied home range sizes and distribution patterns in Common Cu...
Code
It is a small script for processing weather station data from NOAA
Article
A host that has been targeted by an avian brood parasite can recover most of its potential fitness loss by ejecting the foreign egg(s) from its nest. The propensity for some hosts to engage in egg rejection behavior has put selective pressure on their parasites to evolve mimetic eggshells resembling the host's own shell colors and maculation. In tu...
Article
Full-text available
We have studied how individual decisions about timing of breeding and nest location affected the reproductive success of rooks by tracing the formation of a rook breeding colony in Hortobágy National Park (Hungary), during the breeding season in 1999. We have found that birds who built nests earlier also laid eggs earlier and had larger clutch size...
Preprint
Full-text available
We have studied how individual decisions about timing of breeding and nest location affected the reproductive success of rooks by tracing the formation of a rook breeding colony in Hortobágy NP (Hungary), during the breeding season in 1999. We have found that birds who built nests earlier also laid eggs earlier and had larger clutch size but had no...
Article
We tagged 12 adult Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) with non-platform terminal transmitter (non-PTT) GPS-UHF telemetry at their breeding grounds in Hungary. One male and two female Cuckoos (one of them twice) were again observed in subsequent years, and GPS fixes documented their migration routes to and from Africa, as far south as Namibia. All fou...
Article
Common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) are best known for their simple two-note calls ("cu-coo"), which are uttered only by males during the breeding season. A previous playback study revealed that territorial males were more tolerant toward playbacks of the calls of familiar, neighbouring individuals than toward unfamiliar, stranger simulated intruders,...
Article
The characteristics of common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) and host eggs are widely thought to have coevolved over time, but few studies have tested this prediction. We compared cuckoo eggs with those of its primary host, the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) from four time periods spanning >100 years (between 1900 and 2014), and studied i...
Article
Common cuckoos, Cuculus canorus, are brood parasites: they lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, and let these hosts incubate their eggs and feed and rear the nestlings. Although cuckoos do not show parental care, they demonstrate complex social interactions, including territorial behaviours and male–male aggression. Cuckoos have a wel...
Article
Full-text available
Video techniques are broadly used in the field of behaviour sciences, thus there is an increasing interest in softwares that simplify the processing of recordings. One of the difficulties is that observed objects can exhibit a wide variety of behaviours that cannot usually be recognized and recorded automatically, therefore the video has to be watc...
Article
Distinctive individual vocalizations are advantageous in several social contexts. Both genetic and environmental effects are responsible for this phenomenon resulting in different frequencies and time domains of sounds in birds. This individuality can be utilized in breeding bird censuses and abundance estimates. In this study we explored the indiv...
Article
Capsule Brood parasitic Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus chicks hatch earlier than the nestlings of their Great Reed Warbler Acrocephalus arundinaceus hosts, but hatching priority is less consistent when Cuckoo eggs are laid after the onset of host incubation.Aim To reveal by field observations what the optimal stage is for Cuckoos to lay their eggs i...
Article
Full-text available
Experimentation is at the heart of classical and modern behavioral ecology research. The manipulation of natural cues allows us to establish causation between aspects of the environment, both internal and external to organisms, and their effects on animals' behaviors. In recognition systems research, including the quest to understand the coevolutio...
Article
The coevolutionary process among avian brood parasites and their hosts involves stepwise changes induced by the antagonistic selection pressures of one on the other. As long-term data on an evolutionary scale is almost impossible to obtain, most studies can only show snapshots of such processes. Information on host behaviour, such as changes in egg...
Article
Full-text available
Background Many potential hosts of social parasites recognize and reject foreign intruders, and reduce or altogether escape the negative impacts of parasitism. The ontogenetic basis of whether and how avian hosts recognize their own and the brood parasitic eggs remains unclear. By repeatedly parasitizing the same hosts with a consistent parasitic e...
Article
Full-text available
Great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) are frequently parasitized by egg-mimetic common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) in Hungary, and these hosts reject about a third of parasitic eggs. The timing of parasitism is important, in that the probability of rejection decreases with advancing breeding stages in this host. Also, egg rejection is more...
Article
Egg discrimination by hosts is an antiparasitic defence to reject foreign eggs from the nest. Even when mimetic, the presence of brood parasitic egg(s) typically alters the overall similarity of all eggs in a clutch, producing a discordant clutch compared to more homogenous clutches of composed only of hosts’ own eggs. In multiple parasitism, the m...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence is accumulating that halting biodiversity loss requires effective cooperation between conservation and science. One possible solution to such collaborations is to improve open and free data exchange. Here we introduce a conceptually novel solution which can serve as a common interface for both research and conservation. Our system (openbio...
Article
Full-text available
Many hosts have evolved diverse cognitive mechanisms to recognize and reduce the cost of social parasitism. For example, great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus can accurately reject closely mimetic eggs of brood parasitic common cuckoos Cuculus canorus. Yet, these same hosts are less effective at identifying and rejecting parasitism when the...
Article
Full-text available
Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) parasitize nests of small passerines. The Cuckoo chicks cause the death of their nest-mates when evicting eggs or nestlings from the nests; conse- quently, hosts suffer from a high loss of reproduction. Host adaptations against parasitism, e.g., by egg discrimination behavior, and cuckoo counter-adaptations to hos...
Article
Full-text available
To avoid competition for parental care, brood-parasitic Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) nestlings evict all of the host's eggs and nestlings within a few days after hatching. Little is known about the physiological effects of eviction behavior on the cuckoo nestling's oxidative balance or about age-related variation in plasma oxidative status and t...
Article
Chicks of the brood parasitic common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) typically monopolize host parental care by evicting all eggs and nestmates from the nest. To assess the benefits of parasitic eviction behaviour throughout the full nestling period, we generated mixed broods of one cuckoo and one great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) to study ho...
Article
Evolutionary adaptations are required by common cuckoos Cuculus canorus to match host eggs. Hosts may discriminate against alien eggs; hence, accurate matching of the parasite egg to the hosts' is essential. Egg shape is the least-studied component of egg mimicry, and it may also have other functions: an optimal egg shape is necessary for effective...
Article
Full-text available
Hosts of the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), an avian brood parasite, develop antiparasite defense mechanisms to increase their reproductive success. Ejection of the parasite egg and desertion of the parasitized nest are the most typical adaptations in response to brood parasitism, but nest desertion may also occur in response to partial clutch re...
Article
Full-text available
The offspring of brood parasitic birds benefit from hatching earlier than host young. A proposed but little-known strategy to achieve this is 'internal incubation', by retaining the egg in the oviduct for an additional 24 h. To test this, we quantified the stage of embryo development at laying in four brood parasitic birds (European cuckoo, Cuculus...
Article
Full-text available
Many avian hosts have evolved antiparasite defence mechanisms, including egg rejection, to reduce the costs of brood parasitism. The two main alternative cognitive mechanisms of egg discrimination are thought to be based on the perceived discordancy of eggs in a clutch or the use of recognition templates by hosts. Our experiments reveal that the gr...
Article
The developmental rate of cuckoo embryos and their hatching size is greater than that of host species, which may require more nutrient resources in the egg and more intensive gas exchange during development. In the present study, we compared various egg characteristics of a brood parasite, the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus, and its frequent host, t...
Article
Full-text available
Chicks of virulent brood parasitic birds eliminate their nestmates and avoid costly competition for foster parental care. Yet, efforts to evict nest contents by the blind and naked common cuckoo Cuculus canorus hatchling are counterintuitive as both adult parasites and large older cuckoo chicks appear to be better suited to tossing the eggs and you...
Article
In birds, multiple parasitism is the laying of two or more eggs by one or more parasitic females in a single host nest. Several cognitive mechanisms may explain how multiple parasitism could affect parasite egg discrimination by hosts. Rejection based on discordance predicts that multiple parasitism provides a perceptually more error-prone way for...
Article
Full-text available
There is widespread evidence that individuals within and among host populations are not evenly parasitized by Common Cuckoos (Cuculus canorus). We first investigated whether the song and nest size of a host species, the Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), reveal information on parental abilities and level of defense against Common Cucko...
Article
Full-text available
Common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) parasitism drastically reduces the reproductive success of their hosts and selects for host discrimination of cuckoo eggs. In a second stage of anti-parasite adaptation, once cuckoos can lay eggs that mimic those of their hosts, a high uniformity of host egg appearance within a clutch may favour cuckoo egg discrimina...
Article
Full-text available
Hosts are expected to evolve resistance strategies that efficiently detect and resist exposure to virulent parasites and pathogens. When recognition is not error-proof, the acceptance threshold used by hosts to recognize parasites should be context dependent and become more restrictive with increasing predictability of parasitism. Here, we demonstr...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
OpenHerpMaps is a database dedicated to collecting and publishing information regarding the distribution of amphibians and reptiles in Romania. Its main aim is to ensure access to raw data collected by herpetologists or naturalists to be used for scientific research, nature conservation, education, or for other non-commercial purposes.
Project
In the Balkan Herps project our aim is to study the amphibian and reptile diversity of the Balkan Peninsula especially for their effective conservation. With systematic conservation planning and species distribution models we would like to test the effectiveness of the existing protected area network and help guide the designation of new ones. This is especially important for EU candidate countries where new Natura 2000 areas will be created. We established an online platform where everybody can upload their records which we can use to build species distribution models. You can find it here: http://openbiomaps.org/projects/balkanherps/ If you have records from amphibians and reptiles from the Balkan Peninsula please share it with us. We made a video about the process of data uploading: https://youtu.be/qsu-0UeC46g If you have further questions please write to Márton Szabolcs at szabolcs.marci gmail.