Miguel Borja

Miguel Borja
Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango · Facultad en Ciencias Biológicas

Doctor en Ciencias Biomédicas
College professor

About

31
Publications
6,549
Reads
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238
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
233 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
Miguel Borja currently works at the Facultad en Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango. Miguel does research in toxinology.
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - present
Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango
Position
  • Professor (Full)
August 2012 - November 2016
Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
The most enigmatic group of rattlesnakes is the long-tailed rattlesnake group, consisting of three species: Crotalus ericsmithi, Crotalus lannomi and Crotalus stejnegeri. These species have been the least studied rattlesnakes in all aspects, and no study on the characterization of their venoms has been carried out to date. Our main objective was to...
Article
Differential temporality of daily activity patterns allows the coexistence of related species. This strategy is believed to be used by sympatric leporids black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus) and desert cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) in the Mapimi Biosphere Reserve in Mexico. Using trap cameras, we recorded the temporal niche and nine spe...
Article
Full-text available
Crotalus ravus is a rattlesnake considered a priority species. However, in the area where it was firs recorded in Hidalgo, Mexico, there has been a low sampling effort. Thus, updating the information about their distribution in Hidalgo has biological can conservation relevance. In the present work, new records of C. ravus in the southeast of Hidalg...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the Crotalus durissus species group are amongst the largest species of rattlesnakes and are of strong medical importance. The taxonomy of the group is convoluted, and the line of what is considered a species, subspecies or populations is hard to define. A recent study split one of the members of the group (C. culminatus) into three speci...
Article
[https://doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2021.11.009] Most traditional research on snake venoms has focused on front-fanged snake families (Viperidae, Elapidae, and Atractaspididae). However, venom is now generally accepted as being a much more broadly possessed trait within snakes, including species traditionally considered harmless. Unfortunately, due...
Article
Intraspecific variation in snake venoms has been widely documented worldwide. However, there are few studies on this subject in Mexico. Venom characterization studies provide important data used to predict clinical syndromes, to evaluate the efficacy of antivenoms and, in some cases, to improve immunogenic mixtures in the production of antivenoms....
Article
Significance Why biological complexity evolves is a major question in the life sciences, but the specific selection pressures favoring simple or complex traits remain unclear. Using high-resolution measurements of venom complexity in North American pitvipers, we link changes in complexity to natural history via phylogenetic diversity of snake diets...
Article
Full-text available
El estudio de los venenos de serpientes mexicanas ha retomado importancia en los últimos cinco años. Se han caracterizado un número importante de venenos, que incluyen estudios sobre la variación intraespecífica de las especies de mayor importancia médica. Sin embargo, hay una enorme falta de reportes de casos clínicos y estudios sobre la potencia...
Article
The study of Mexican snake venoms has increased in importance in the past five years. A significant number of venoms have been characterized, including studies of intraspecific variation in species of major medical importance. However, there is alack clinical case reports and studies on the neutralizing potency of antivenoms on the venom of Mexican...
Article
Snakebite in Mexico is commonly treated with an antivenom which uses Bothrops asper and Crotalus simus venoms as immunogens. Current taxonomic recommendations for the C. simus species complex suggest a novel endemic species from Mexico: Crotalus mictlantecuhtli. The aim of this report was to evaluate the immunogenic properties of C. mictlantecuhtli...
Article
The Coahuila box turtle (Terrapene coahuila) is an endangered species of chelonian endemic to the Cuatro Ciénegas valley in northern Mexico. It is the only aquatic member of the genus Terrapene and is dependent on permanent and seasonal wetlands. Over the past several decades, T. coahuila populations have declined from habitat loss as the wetlands...
Article
Full-text available
Snake venoms represent an enriched system for investigating the evolutionary processes that lead to complex and dynamic trophic adaptations. It has long been hypothesized that natural selection may drive geographic variation in venom composition, yet previous studies have lacked the population genetic context to examine these patterns. We leverage...
Article
Full-text available
Ontogenetic changes in venom composition have important ecological implications due the relevance of venom in prey acquisition and defense. Additionally, intraspecific venom variation has direct medical consequences for the treatment of snakebite. However, ontogenetic changes are not well documented in most species. The Mexican Black-tailed Rattles...
Article
Venoms of the three species of Ophryacus (O. sphenophrys, O. smaragdinus, and O. undulatus), a viperid genus endemic to Mexico, were analyzed for the first time in the present work. The three venoms lacked procoagulant activity on human plasma, but induced hemorrhage and were highly lethal to mice. These venoms also displayed proteolytic and phosph...
Article
The Mojave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus) inhabits deserts and arid grasslands of the western United States and Mexico. Despite considerable interest in its highly toxic venom and the recognition of two subspecies, no molecular studies have characterized range-wide genetic diversity and population structure or tested species limits within C. scu...
Article
Full-text available
Rattlesnake venoms may be classified according to the presence/absence and relative abundance of the neurotoxic phospholipases A 2 s (PLA 2 s), such as Mojave toxin, and snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). In Mexico, studies to determine venom variation in Mojave Rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) are limited and little is known abou...
Article
Full-text available
The Tamaulipan rock rattlesnake (Crotalus lepidus morulus) is a montane snake that occurs in the humid pine-oak forest and the upper cloud forest of the Sierra Madre Oriental in southwestern Tamaulipas, central Nuevo Leon, and southeastern Coahuila in Mexico. Venom from this rattlesnake was fractionated by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for...
Article
La serpiente de la Roca de Tamaulipas (Mexico) (Crotalus lepidus morulus) es una serpiente de cascabel de montana que se encuentra en el bosque de pino-encino humedo y el bosque nuboso superior de la Sierra Madre Oriental en el suroeste de Tamaulipas, en el centro de Nuevo Leon, y el sureste de Coahuila en Mexico. El veneno de estas serpientes fue...
Article
Full-text available
The Mojave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) is considered one of the most dangerous in North America and its venom can be classified into three types (Type A, B, and A+B) according to its neurotoxic and/or hemorrhagic effects. The objective of this study was to identify the venom of several individuals of C. s. scutulatus present in the...
Data
Full-text available
The Tamaulipan rock rattlesnake (Crotalus lepidus morulus) is a small, cold-tolerant, mountain rattlesnake that occupies the Sierra Madre Oriental in southwestern Tamaulipas, central Nuevo Leon, and southeastern Coahuila in Mexico. The aim of the present study was to analyze and compare the protein profile and proteolytic activity of 16 individual...
Article
The rock rattlesnakes Crotalus lepidus comprise a group (lepidus, klauberi, morulus and maculosus) of poorly known mountain cold-tolerant snakes in Mexico. In particular, C. l. morulus is a snake endemic of the northeast of Mexico, whereas C. l. klauberi and C. l. lepidus are distributed in some regions of the north and central Mexico and southern...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Determinar la presencia de poblaciones de C. scutulatus y C. molossus con veneno neurotoxico en el estado de Durango, asi como evaluar sus características bioquímicas y biológicas.