Miguel A Bedoya-Pérez

Miguel A Bedoya-Pérez
The University of Sydney · School of Phsycology

PhD Biological Sciences

About

34
Publications
9,165
Reads
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267
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
243 Citations
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Introduction
I am interested in the evolution and ecological significance of behavioural traits in animals. From foraging, social networking to mating systems and sexual selection. I am also interested in the adaptability of theses behavioural traits to environmental changes (anthropogenic or naturals), that can affect animal’s populations and induce the appearance of new dynamics, such as: species interactions with new species (exotic) and the adaptability of the species to the changed environment.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - September 2013
Royal Botanic Gardens
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Sampling and processing of botanical material and photographic recording of flower morphology across Queensland State.
July 2013 - November 2013
The University of Sydney
Position
  • The Science Gifted and Talented Discovery Program
Description
  • High-school science students (Years 9 and 10) - Lecturing and practical (laboratory-based) student supervision.
July 2013 - November 2013
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Ecology and Conservation. Casual Academic Staff
Description
  • Practical (lab-based) student supervision, and report marking.
Education
August 2012 - August 2012
Cynergex Group
Cynergex Group
Field of study
August 2010 - August 2010
Centre for Continuing Education, The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Digital Photography
November 2009 - November 2009
Centre for Continuing Education, The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Digital Photography

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Background Australian pharmacists currently dispense a wide range of prescription-only cannabis-based medicines. Recent regulatory changes will expand the role of pharmacists, allowing certain low-dose cannabidiol products to be supplied without a prescription in pharmacies. This harmonises Australia with many other countries where cannabidiol prod...
Article
Full-text available
A regulatory framework allowing legal access to medicinal cannabis (MC) products has operated in Australia since November 2016. MC prescribing by healthcare practitioners (HCPs) is primarily conducted through the Special Access Scheme-Category B (SAS-B) pathway, through which prescribers apply to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA-the federa...
Article
Agile Wallaby (Notamacropus agilis) has been in the diet of Aboriginal inhabitants of northern Australia for millennia. The species inhabits riparian zones and savannah woodlands, has a high rate of natural increase and can become pests in modified agricultural or plantation systems. Although the profitability of market‐based game harvesting appear...
Article
Full-text available
Sensitivity to predator-related cues and performance of antipredator behaviors are universal among prey species. Rodents exhibit a diverse suite of antipredator behaviors that have been examined in both field and laboratory studies. However, the results from the laboratory have not always translated to the field. While laboratory studies consistent...
Article
Full-text available
Shortly after the enactment of restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of COVID-19, various local government and public health authorities around the world reported an increased sighting of rats. Such reports have yet to be empirically validated. Here we combined data from multi-catch rodent stations (providing data on rodent captures), rodent ba...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding wild animal responses to stressors underpins effective wildlife management. In order for responses to stressors to be correctly interpreted, it is critical that measurements are taken on wild animals using minimally invasive techniques. Studies investigating wild animal responses to stressors often measure either a single physiologica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Shortly after the enactment of restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of COVID-19, local governments and public health authorities around the world reported an increased sighting of rats. We combined multi-catch rodent station data, rodent bait stations data, and rodent-related residents’ complaints data to explore the effects that social distan...
Article
Capybaras, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (Rodentia: Caviidae: Hydrochoerinae), show a strict social hierarchy among males, wherein the top-ranking male gains preferential access to females. Despite minimal sexual size dimorphism, males have a prominent scent gland on their snouts that is greatly reduced in the females. Top-ranking males have a larger g...
Article
Few animal models exist that successfully reproduce several core associative and non-associative behaviours relevant to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as long-lasting fear reactions, hyperarousal, and subtle attentional and cognitive dysfunction. As such, these models may lack the face validity required to adequately model pathophysiol...
Article
Full-text available
The strong innate fear response shown by laboratory rodents to predator cues could provide powerful and innovative tools for pest management. Predator cues are routinely used to induce fear and anxiety in laboratory rodents for pharmacological studies. However, research on the fear response induced by predator cues in different species of rodents i...
Presentation
Full-text available
Capybaras, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, show a strict social hierarchy among males where the dominant male gains preferential access to females. There is no sexual size dimorphism, but males have a prominent scent gland on their snouts that produces a copious secretion. Dominant males have a larger gland and mark more frequently than subordinates. Th...
Conference Paper
Feral Asian swamp buffalo are a key land management concern in the Northern Territory, Australia, being both threats to native ecosystems and an important cultural and commercial resource. Over the last decade the total population has quickly risen to over 100,000 in protected areas of the north-eastern NT. Growing calls for conservation culls and...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Conflict between Top End livestock producers and high densities of Agile Wallabies (Macropus agilis) on pastoral land has been ongoing for decades. In recent years, wallaby numbers and densities on pastoral lands have increased dramatically. In some agricultural situations wallaby densities are 1,000 times greater than the natural density (<0.5 ani...
Poster
Full-text available
Macropods are particularly known for their proclivity to suffer from stress related injuries and ailments as a result of capture. Over the years, several different methods for capturing macropods have been develop, but in general they can be classified in two major groups, trapping and darting. Trapping is most commonly used for small macropods tha...
Presentation
Full-text available
Despite of the widespread distribution and common nature of agile wallabies, the ecology of this species remains poorly known. Only a handful of studies have explored this species habits. The only comprehensive studies done, comprised their biology and reproduction in captivity and a handful of studies concerning their diet and behaviour in very sp...
Technical Report
Conflict between Top End livestock producers and high densities of Agile Wallabies (Macropus agilis) on pastoral land has been ongoing for decades. In recent decades wallaby numbers and densities on pastoral lands have increased dramatically. In some agricultural situations wallaby densities are 1000 times greater (>5 animals ha-1) than the natural...
Poster
Full-text available
Different land use practices often influence the distribution and abundance of wildlife. This can lead to uncontrolled population growth by native species, causing substantial economic and ecological impacts to the landscape. In this scenario, assessment of the extent of these effects and possible management responses needs to be achieved within ti...
Presentation
Full-text available
Conflict between Top End pastoralists and agile wallabies has been ongoing for decades. In 2009, Katherine Pastoral Industry Advisory Committee (KPIAC) reported a dramatic increase in wallaby numbers since the late 1990’s, and requested that the NT government survey populations and allow large culls around farmland. The NT government requested that...
Technical Report
Conflict between Top End producers and high densities of Agile Wallabies (Macropus agilis) on pastoral land has been ongoing for decades. In recent decades wallaby numbers and densities on pastoral lands have increased dramatically. In some agricultural situations wallaby densities are 1000 times greater (>5 animals ha-1) than the natural density....
Presentation
Full-text available
Different land use practices often influence the distribution and abundance of wildlife. This can lead to uncontrolled population growth by native species, causing substantial economic and ecological impacts to the landscape. In this scenario, assessment of the extent of these effects and possible management responses needs to be achieved within ti...
Article
Full-text available
While trying to achieve their nutritional requirements, foraging herbivores face the costs of plant defenses, such as toxins. Teasing apart the costs and benefits of various chemical constituents in plants is difficult because their chemical defenses and nutrient concentrations often co-vary. We used an approach derived from predator-prey studies t...
Article
Full-text available
Olfaction is an important sense for many animals, yet its role in foraging by herbivores is poorly known. Many plants contain volatile compounds, such as terpenes, that are not only volatile but can be toxic if ingested. Volatile terpenes can be used by herbivores to assess leaf quality, but there is little evidence for whether they are also used a...
Article
Full-text available
The giving-up density (GUD) framework provides a powerful experimental approach with a strong theoretical underpinning to quantify foraging outcomes in heterogeneous landscapes. Since its inception, the GUD approach has been applied successfully to a vast range of foraging species and foraging scenarios. However, its application is not simple, as a...
Presentation
Full-text available
Odour is an important sense for many animals, yet its role in foraging by herbivores is little known. Many plants contain volatile compounds, such as terpenes, that are not only volatile but can be toxic if ingested. Volatile terpenes can be used by herbivores to assess leaf quality, but there is little evidence for whether they are also used as a...
Presentation
Full-text available
Odour is an important sense for many animals, yet its role in foraging by herbivores is little known. Many plants contain volatile compounds, such as terpenes, that are not only volatile but can be toxic if ingested. Volatile terpenes can be used by herbivores to assess leaf quality, but there is little evidence for whether they are also used as a...
Poster
Full-text available
The Giving Up Density (GUD) framework provides a powerful experimental approach, with strong theoretical underpinning, for quantifying foraging outcomes in heterogeneous landscapes. Since its inception, GUD has been applied successfully to a vast range of foraging species and foraging scenarios. Commonly, but not exclusively, it has been used to qu...
Presentation
Full-text available
Foraging herbivores face the costs of plant defences, such as toxins, while trying to get the nutrients they need. Teasing apart the costs and benefits of plant defences and nutrients is complicated and often difficult with real plants because nutrient and toxin concentrations often co-vary. To overcome this problem we applied a well-established pr...
Presentation
Full-text available
The Giving Up Density (GUD) framework provides a powerful experimental approach, with strong theoretical underpinning, for quantifying foraging outcomes in heterogeneous landscapes. Since its inception, GUD has been applied successfully to a vast range of foraging species and foraging scenarios. Commonly, but not exclusively, it has been used to qu...
Presentation
Full-text available
Herbivores encounter Plants Secondary Metabolites (PSMs) that can act as toxins or as digestibility-reducers, diminishing food profitability. Foragers are selective in where and what they eat, in part to reduce costs of consuming PSMs. Swamp wallabies are mammalian browsers that eat range of plants (such as Eucalyptus seedlings, shrubs and bracken...
Poster
Full-text available
Optimal foraging theory states that the decisions made by a forager are based on profitability. Herbivores encounter Plants Secondary Metabolites (PSMs) that can act as toxins or as digestibility-reducers, diminishing food profitability. Foragers have been shown to be selective in where and what they eat, in part to reduce the costs of consuming PS...
Poster
Full-text available
Sexual selection has two components, an intra-sexual component where individuals of one sex, usually males, compete among themselves for access to the other sex, and an inter-sexual component, where one sex, usually females, chooses a member of the other as mate. The latter tends to produce ornaments in the chosen sex while the former produces sexu...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
I am running some analyses on count data, and I am including a single random factor, thus I am using GLMM in r (glmer fo the package lme4).
In order to chose the best model and distribution I am running the same model with negative binomial distribution (glmer.nb) but also with a poisson distribution (glmer with family = poisson). Then I compare the residuals between the two models. However, in general, the negative binomial models show better fit, but they also give me a singularity warning when I ran them. I have tried simplifying the models, but I keep getting the singularity warning.
My question is: should I reject the singular model as invalid, even though ids the one with the best fit?
Cheers,
Miguel
Question
Hello,
I may have access to around 30, 9 grams VHF transmitters that, for a series of reasons, are not going to be used.
I was planning on radio tracking Agile wallabies in the near future (depending on funding), and for that I was going to use collars. However, since these transmitters are available I was wondering if anybody has experience on using glue on tags on medium size mammals.
Cheers,
Miguel
Question
I have been working with macropods for 5 years now, and I am familiar with the use of mammary gland distension and lactation to estimating how recently a female has carry young and in some cases if it has a dependent joey on foot. However, I was recently told, by someone knowledgeable in vertebrate management, that the distension of the the pouch itself can by use to estimate if the female has carried young before, or if it has never reproduce.
I have tried looking for articles that may support this, but I haven't had any luck. Does anybody know if this is accurate or not? 

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Our overall objective is to develop a powerful new rodent repellent, and to improve knowledge of predator-related odour recognition in rats.