Mickael Deroche

Mickael Deroche
Concordia University Montreal · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

51
Publications
5,846
Reads
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563
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in the perception and production of voice pitch, from normal hearing to cochlear implants, and from audiology to cognitive neurosciences, using behavioral and neurophysiological techniques (tDCS, EEG, fMRI, fNIRS, pupillometry).
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - May 2019
McGill University
Position
  • Research Associate
November 2013 - November 2014
Johns Hopkins University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • This course presented a brief history of cochlear implants, from surgical procedures to clinical outcomes. Applications to the perception of speech and music were reviewed.
January 2012 - November 2014
Johns Hopkins University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2006 - January 2010
Cardiff University, School of Psychology
Field of study
  • Psychoacoustics of Speech Perception
October 2005 - October 2006
Université de Poitiers
Field of study
  • Mechanics Energetics Engineering
October 2003 - October 2006
Ecole d'Ingenieur de Poitiers, France
Field of study
  • Acoustics

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Speech recognition in a complex masker usually benefits from masker harmonicity, but there are several factors at work. The present study focused on two of them, glimpsing spectrally in between masker partials and periodicity within individual frequency channels. Using both a theoretical and an experimental approach, it is demonstrated that when in...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments investigated the ability of 17 school-aged children to process purely temporal and spectro-temporal cues that signal changes in pitch. Percentage correct was measured for the discrimination of sinusoidal amplitude modulation rate (AMR) of broadband noise in experiment 1 and for the discrimination of fundamental frequency (F0) of bro...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments investigated listeners' ability to use a difference of two semitones in fundamental frequency (F0) to segregate a target voice from harmonic complex tones, with speech-like spectral profiles. Masker partials were in random phase (experiment 1) or in sine phase (experiment 2) and stimuli were presented over headphones. Target's and m...
Article
Three experiments investigated listeners' ability to detect a narrow band of noise, centered on one partial of a random-phase complex tone, as a function of inharmonicity. Inharmonicity was generated by randomly mistuning the partial frequencies from a 100-Hz fundamental frequency (F0). In experiment 1, masked detection thresholds were lower when t...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals with misophonia, a disorder involving extreme sound sensitivity, report significant anger, disgust, and anxiety in response to select but usually common sounds. While estimates of prevalence within certain populations such as college students have approached 20%, it is currently unknown what percentage of people experience misophonic re...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives To explore the effects of obligatory lexical tone learning on speech emotion recognition and the cross-culture differences between United States and Taiwan for speech emotion understanding in children with cochlear implant. Methods This cohort study enrolled 60 cochlear-implanted (cCI) Mandarin-speaking, school-aged children who underwe...
Article
Objectives: Variations in loudness are a fundamental component of the music listening experience. Cochlear implant (CI) processing, including amplitude compression, and a degraded auditory system may further degrade these loudness cues and decrease the enjoyment of music listening. This study aimed to identify optimal CI sound processor compressio...
Article
Background Considerable variability exists in the speech recognition abilities achieved by children with cochlear implants (CIs) due to varying demographic and performance variables including language abilities. Purpose This article examines the factors associated with speech recognition performance of school-aged children with CIs who were grouped...
Article
SUMMARY Objective Using voice to speak or to sing is made possible by remarkably complex sensorimotor processes. Like any other sensorimotor system, the speech motor controller guides its actions with maximum performance at minimum cost, using available sources of information, among which, auditory feedback plays a major role. Manipulation of this...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has demonstrated that pupillometry is a robust measure for quantifying listening effort. However, pupillary responses in listening situations where multiple cognitive functions are engaged and sustained over a period of time remain hard to interpret. This limits our conceptualisation and understanding of listening effort in realisti...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Monitoring voice pitch is a fine-tuned process in daily conversations as conveying accurately the linguistic and affective cues in a given utterance depends on the precise control of phonation and intonation. This monitoring is thought to depend on whether the error is treated as self-generated or externally-generated, resulting in either...
Article
Objectives: Cochlear implants (CIs) are remarkable in allowing individuals with severe to profound hearing loss to perceive speech. Despite these gains in speech understanding, however, CI users often struggle to perceive elements such as vocal emotion and prosody, as CIs are unable to transmit the spectro-temporal detail needed to decode affectiv...
Article
Full-text available
Stuttering is a disorder that impacts the smooth flow of speech production and is associated with a deficit in sensorimotor integration. In a previous experiment, individuals who stutter were able to vocally compensate for pitch shifts in their auditory feedback, but they exhibited more variability in the timing of their corrective responses. In th...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: This study examined the utilization of multiple types of acoustic information in lexical tone production and perception by pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients who are native speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Methods: Lexical tones were recorded from CI recipients and their peers with normal hearing (NH). Each participant was asked to pr...
Article
Speech timing deficits have been proposed as a causal factor in the disorder of stuttering. The question of whether individuals who stutter have deficits in nonspeech timing is one that has been revisited often, with conflicting results. Here, we uncover subtle differences in a manual metronome synchronization task that included tempo changes with...
Article
Cochlear implant (CI) biomechanical constraints result in impoverished spectral cues and poor frequency resolution, making it difficult for users to perceive pitch and timbre. There is emerging evidence that music training may improve CI-mediated music perception; however, much of the existing studies involve time-intensive and less readily accessi...
Article
In cocktail-party situations, listeners can use the fundamental frequency (F0) of a voice to segregate it from competitors, but other cues in speech could help, such as co-modulation of envelopes across frequency or more complex cues related to the semantic/syntactic content of the utterances. For simplicity, this (non-pitch) form of grouping is re...
Article
Objective: Cochlear implants (CIs) restore a sense of hearing in deaf individuals. However, they do not transmit the acoustic signal with sufficient fidelity, leading to difficulties in recognizing emotions in voice and in music. The study aimed to explore the neurophysiological bases of these limitations. Design: Twenty-two adults (18 to 70 yea...
Article
Full-text available
In tonal languages, voice pitch inflections change the meaning of words, such that the brain processes pitch not merely as an acoustic characterization of sound but as semantic information. In normally-hearing (NH) adults, this linguistic pressure on pitch appears to sharpen its neural encoding and can lead to perceptual benefits, depending on the...
Article
Full-text available
In tonal languages, voice pitch inflections change the meaning of words, such that the brain processes pitch not merely as an acoustic characterization of sound but as semantic information. In normally-hearing (NH) adults, this linguistic pressure on pitch appears to sharpen its neural encoding and can lead to perceptual benefits, depending on the...
Article
Full-text available
Persistent developmental stuttering affects close to 1% of adults and is thought to be a problem of sensorimotor integration. Previous research has demonstrated that individuals who stutter respond differently to changes in their auditory feedback while speaking. Here we explore a number of changes that accompany alterations in the feedback of pitc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As cochlear implants (CIs) do not provide adequate representation of the harmonic structure of complex sounds, the perception of the voice fundamental frequency (F0) is severely limited in CI users. As F0 plays an important role in speech prosody and in lexical tones, this deficit has a negative impact on communication. Here we focus on the pediatr...
Article
Full-text available
The inferior parietal lobe (IPL) is a region of the cortex believed to participate in speech motor learning. In this study, we investigated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the IPL could influence the extent to which healthy adults (1) adapted to a sensory alteration of their own auditory feedback, and (2) changed their per...
Article
Full-text available
Musicians can sometimes achieve better speech recognition in noisy backgrounds than non-musicians, a phenomenon referred to as the “musician advantage effect.” In addition, musicians are known to possess a finer sense of pitch than non-musicians. The present study examined the hypothesis that the latter fact could explain the former. Four experimen...
Article
Differences in fundamental frequency (ΔF0s) and differences in spatial location (ΔSLs) between competing talkers can substantially enhance intelligibility of a target voice in a typical cocktail-party situation. Reverberation is generally detrimental to the use of these two cues, but it is possible to create laboratory conditions where reverberatio...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The objective was to investigate acoustic cue processing in lexical-tone recognition by pediatric cochlear-implant (CI) recipients who are native Mandarin speakers. Method Lexical-tone recognition was assessed in pediatric CI recipients and listeners with normal hearing (NH) in 2 tasks. In Task 1, participants identified naturally uttered...
Article
Differences in fundamental frequency (F0), modulations in the masker envelope, and differences in spatial location between a speech target and a masker can improve speech intelligibility in cocktail-party situations. These cues have been thoroughly investigated independently and associated with unmasking mechanisms: F0 segregation, temporal dip lis...
Article
Voice emotion is a fundamental component of human social interaction and social development. Unfortunately, cochlear implant users are often forced to interface with highly degraded prosodic cues as a result of device constraints in extraction, processing, and transmission. As such, individuals with cochlear implants frequently demonstrate signific...
Article
A difference in fundamental frequency (ΔF0) and a difference in spatial location (ΔSL) are two cues known to provide masking releases when multiple speakers talk at once in a room. We examined situations in which reverberation should have no effect on the mechanisms underlying the releases from energetic masking produced by these two cues. Speech r...
Article
Full-text available
Extinction is a fundamental form of memory updating in which one learns to stop expecting an event that no longer occurs. This learning ensues when one experiences a change in environmental contingencies, that is, when an expected outcome fails to occur (simple extinction), or when a novel inflated expectation of a double outcome (overexpectation)...
Article
Sensitivity to static changes in pitch has been shown to be poorer in school-aged children wearing cochlear implants(CIs) than children with normal hearing (NH), but it is unclear whether this is also the case for dynamic changes. Yet, dynamically changing pitch has considerable ecological relevance in terms of natural speech, particularly aspects...
Article
Full-text available
Sensitivity to static changes in pitch has been shown to be poorer in school-aged children wearing cochlear implants (CIs) than children with normal hearing (NH), but it is unclear whether this is also the case for dynamic changes in pitch. Yet, dynamically changing pitch has considerable ecological relevance in terms of natural speech, particularl...
Article
Objective: To determine whether exaggerating the variations in fundamental frequency (F0) contours of Mandarin-based pitch fluctuations could improve tone identification by cochlear implant (CI) users. Methods: Twelve normal-hearing (NH) listeners and 11 CI users were tested for their ability to recognize F0 contours modeled after Mandarin tones...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Children and adults with normal hearing (NH) as well as those who use cochlear implants (CIs) were tested on a voice emotion recognition task. The materials were child-directed sentences, and acoustic analyses showed that features such as voice pitch range were exaggerated relative to earlier reports in the literature with adult-directed materials....
Article
Full-text available
When phase relationships between partials of a complex masker produce highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane, listeners may detect speech information from temporal dips in the within-channel masker envelopes. This source of masking release (MR) is however located in regions of unresolved masker partials and it is unclear how mu...
Article
Full-text available
Intelligibility of a target voice improves when its fundamental frequency (F0) differs from that of a masking voice, but it remains unclear how this masking release (MR) depends on the two relative F0s. Three experiments measured speech reception thresholds (SRTs) for a target voice against different maskers. Experiment 1 evaluated the influence of...
Article
Full-text available
Sensitivity to complex pitch is notoriously poor in adults with cochlear implants (CIs), but it is unclear whether this is true for children with CIs. Many are implanted today at a very young age, and factors related to brain plasticity (age at implantation, duration of CI experience, and speaking a tonal language) might have strong influences on p...
Article
Differences in fundamental frequency (F0) and location between a speech target and a masker as well as amplitude modulations in the masker are helpful cues to improve speech intelligibility in cocktail party situations. Each cue has been thoroughly investigated independently in many studies, but it remains unclear whether they interact with each ot...
Article
Full-text available
Speech reception thresholds were measured for a voice against two different maskers: Either two concurrent voices with the same fundamental frequency (F0) or a harmonic complex with the same long-term excitation pattern and broadband temporal envelope as the masking sentences (speech-modulated buzz). All sources had steady F0s. A difference in F0 o...
Article
Full-text available
The face recognition literature has considered two competing accounts of how faces are represented within the visual system: Exemplar-based models assume that faces are represented via their similarity to exemplars of previously experienced faces, while norm-based models assume that faces are represented with respect to their deviation from an aver...
Conference Paper
Three experiments investigated the effect of reverberation on listeners' ability to use the difference in fundamental frequency (F0) between a target and an interfering voice to perceptually separate them. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured for a monotonized or frequency-modulated male voice against one or two other monotonized or fre...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
This project aims to investigate vocal production by CI users, in response to feedback alteration of their voice pitch. The originality of this approach is to shift the usual focus of CI research from perception to production, using devices that attempt to provide finer pitch cues. Indeed, the characteristics that make voice pitch more salient may not necessarily be the same characteristics that are relevant to the speech motor planning areas of the brain. It also has repercussions on music research, since it concerns the ability of CI users to regulate their voice pitch while singing.
Project
Cochlear implants allow deaf people to recover some form of hearing and understand speech, but current devices are limited, and the consequences of these limitations have not been fully explored. For example, there is a growing consensus that hearing loss interacts with cognitive systems. Yet, relatively little is known about the cognitive burden of CI users. The present project is currently developing a robust tool to measure the cognitive effort induced by the CI, using a combination of behavioral scores, pupillometry, and subjective appreciation.
Project
Brain (fMRI) and behavioral correlates of auditory-motor integration in individuals who stutter/stammer.