Michelle L Rogers

Michelle L Rogers
Drexel University | DU · Information Science

PhD

About

35
Publications
10,051
Reads
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730
Citations
Featured research
Article
Full-text available
We assessed the Health Information Technology (HIT) Reference-based Evaluation Framework (HITREF) comprehensiveness in two HIT evaluations in settings different from that in which the HITREF was developed. Clinician satisfaction themes that emerged from clinician interviews in the home care and the hospital studies were compared to the framework components. Across both studies, respondents commented on 12 of the 20 HITREF components within 5 of the 6 HITREF concepts. No new components emerged that were missing from the HITREF providing evidence that the HITREF is a comprehensive framework. HITREF use in a range of HIT evaluations by researchers new to the HITREF demonstrates that it can be used as intended. Therefore, we continue to recommend the HITREF as a comprehensive, research-based HIT evaluation framework to increase the capacity of informatics evaluators' use of best practice and evidence-based practice to support the credibility of their findings for fulfilling the purpose of program evaluation.
Article
Full-text available
We conducted three health care evaluation studies in community and hospital settings to examine adoption of point-of-care documentation systems among interdisciplinary care team clinicians. Both community studies used a mixed methods design to assess actual system usage and clinician satisfaction. In the hospitals, scenario testing was used. Results indicated clinician adoption of the systems was universal, although not always timely with: (1) a mismatch between system functionality and workflow which was a barrier to clinician system access during patient care and reduced clinician efficiency; (2) no increase in interdisciplinary team communication; and (3) no impact on patient outcomes identified by clinicians. To facilitate adoption, clinicians should see the value of using the system as intended by receiving patient care and patient safety feedback that uses system data.
Article
Full-text available
The growing importance of the role of the individual in making informed health decisions has spurred efforts to improve health literacy, especially in vulnerable populations characterized by disparities in health status and access to care. As part of this effort, libraries have engaged in outreach activities targeted at specific populations, institutions, and community groups, often involving multidisciplinary partnerships 1–4. These services are aimed at improving both health literacy and health information literacy. The latter is defined by the Medical Library Association as “the set of abilities needed to recognize a health information need, identify likely information sources and use them to retrieve relevant information, assess the quality of the information and its applicability to a specific situation, and analyze, understand, and use the information to make good health decisions” 5. Health information seeking is generally regarded as a component of health literacy 6. The study reported here describes an approach that used enhanced text messages to encourage health information seeking during pregnancy. The study objectives were to develop and test a simple, replicable intervention that would promote successful and satisfying information seeking by guiding users to key resources on topics relevant to their prenatal education and experience. We also wanted to examine how health sciences librarians add value to multidisciplinary teams engaged in health literacy activities. Building upon previous work reported elsewhere 7, our team of faculty, clinical staff, and librarians identified the opportunity for a health literacy intervention at Drexel University's 11th Street Health Services Center, a federally qualified health center that is located in a public housing development and serves a low-income, predominantly minority population.
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between health information seeking, patient engagement and health literacy is not well understood. This is especially true in medically underserved populations, which are often viewed as having limited access to health information. To improve communication between an urban health centre and the community it serves, a team of library and information science researchers undertook an assessment of patients' level and methods of access to and use of the Internet. Data were collected in 53 face-to-face anonymous interviews with patients at the centre. Interviews were tape-recorded for referential accuracy, and data were analysed to identify patterns of access and use. Seventy-two percentage of study participants reported having access to the Internet through either computers or cell phones. Barriers to Internet access were predominantly lack of equipment or training rather than lack of interest. Only 21% of those with Internet access reported using the Internet to look for health information. The findings suggest that lack of access to the Internet in itself is not the primary barrier to seeking health information in this population and that the digital divide exists not at the level of information access but rather at the level of information use.
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on work carried out to elicit information needs at a trans-disciplinary, nurse-managed health care clinic that serves a medically disadvantaged urban population. The trans-disciplinary model provides a "one-stop shop" for patients who can receive a wide range of services beyond traditional primary care. However, this model of health care presents knowledge sharing challenges because little is known about how data collected from the non-traditional services can be integrated into the traditional electronic medical record (EMR) and shared with other care providers. There is also little known about how health information technology (HIT) can be used to support the workflow in such a practice. The objective of this case study was to identify the information needs of care providers in order to inform the design of HIT to support knowledge sharing and distributed decision making. A participatory design approach is presented as a successful technique to specify requirements for HIT applications that can support a trans-disciplinary model of care. Using this design approach, the researchers identified the information needs of care providers working at the clinic and suggested HIT improvements to integrate non-traditional information into the EMR. These modifications allow knowledge sharing among care providers and support better health decisions. We have identified information needs of care providers as they are relevant to the design of health information systems. As new technology is designed and integrated into various workflows it is clear that understanding information needs is crucial to acceptance of that technology.
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - May 2013
Drexel University
Position
  • Professor (Assisstant)
January 2002 - August 2008
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
Education
September 1996 - August 2002
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Industrial Engineering
September 1990 - May 1993
Georgia Institute of Technology
Field of study
  • Electrical Engineering

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Understanding the information-seeking preferences and Internet access habits of the target audiences for a patient portal is essential for successful uptake. The resource must deliver culturally and educationally appropriate information via technology that is accessible to the intended users and be designed to meet their needs and preferences. Prov...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed the Health Information Technology (HIT) Reference-based Evaluation Framework (HITREF) comprehensiveness in two HIT evaluations in settings different from that in which the HITREF was developed. Clinician satisfaction themes that emerged from clinician interviews in the home care and the hospital studies were compared to the framework co...
Article
This study uses a mixed methods approach to 1) identify surrounding residents' perceived expectations for Housing Opportunities for People Everywhere (HOPE VI) policy on physical activity outcomes and to 2) quantitatively examine the odds of neighborhood-based physical activity pre-/post-HOPE VI in a low socioeconomic status, predominantly African...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted three health care evaluation studies in community and hospital settings to examine adoption of point-of-care documentation systems among interdisciplinary care team clinicians. Both community studies used a mixed methods design to assess actual system usage and clinician satisfaction. In the hospitals, scenario testing was used. Result...
Article
Full-text available
The growing importance of the role of the individual in making informed health decisions has spurred efforts to improve health literacy, especially in vulnerable populations characterized by disparities in health status and access to care. As part of this effort, libraries have engaged in outreach activities targeted at specific populations, instit...
Conference Paper
The popular press is filled with stories about the prevalence of technology use in healthcare. The October 9th edition of the NY Times devoted their entire Science Times section to the “Digital Doctor”; The focus being on the prevalence of digital healthcare applications for “smart” devices. MHealth (mobile health) has emerged as an exciting opport...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between health information seeking, patient engagement and health literacy is not well understood. This is especially true in medically underserved populations, which are often viewed as having limited access to health information. To improve communication between an urban health centre and the community it serves, a team of librar...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on work carried out to elicit information needs at a trans-disciplinary, nurse-managed health care clinic that serves a medically disadvantaged urban population. The trans-disciplinary model provides a "one-stop shop" for patients who can receive a wide range of services beyond traditional primary care. However, this model of hea...
Conference Paper
Health 2.0 is a facet of Web 2.0 that refers to special health applications where patients are able to take a more active role in their own care through the use of information communication technologies. Health 2.0 or Medicine 2.0 (used synonymously here) empowers patients not only through increased participation and interaction in online networks...
Conference Paper
Reports of health information systems failures identified the guilty parties laying with issues around social, technical, and organizational factors. The reason so many systems fail may lie in the socio-cultural fit of e-Health systems. We do not understand how to deliver information to providers when they need it, in a usable format, and in a way...
Conference Paper
This CHI 2011 SIG provides a workshop for collective problem finding and community identification. The goal is to initiate a working group to coordinate systemic design research issues across practitioner communities. This SIG addresses the insufficiency of user-centered design and informatics research to design for system and service-level innovat...
Article
Electronic software packages to support patient tracking and disposition decision making in emergency departments (EDs) are being considered for implementation in many hospitals. We compared extent of use, information accuracy, and functions of manual and electronic patient status boards at 2 EDs where both were continuously in use. Ethnographic ob...
Article
As digital technology permeates contemporary life, questions about the ways in which people access digital resources continue to be raised. As the Pew studies show, health information remains a topic frequently sought on the Internet, but few who seek health information check the credibility or authority of the information they find (http://www.pew...
Article
The goal of this study is to investigate patterns of internet access via computers and cellular telephones among the population being served by the Drexel University Eleventh (11th) Street Health Center (Here after, the Center) and to determine which Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) will be most appropriate for delivering health c...
Article
Full-text available
Common symptoms associated with HIV disease and its management are often underrecognized and undertreated. A clinical decision support tool for symptom management was developed within the Veterans Health Administration electronic medical record (EMR), aiming at increasing provider awareness of and response to common HIV symptoms. Its feasibility wa...
Article
Patient portals may improve pediatric chronic disease outcomes, but few have been rigorously evaluated for usability by parents. Using scenario-based testing with think-aloud protocols, we evaluated the usability of portals for parents of children with cystic fibrosis, diabetes or arthritis. DESIGN Sixteen parents used a prototype and test data to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There has been an increasing need for developing health information systems for improving clinical processes and outcomes. Deeply understanding and accurately capturing the information needs of the stakeholders is crucial to successfully designing and deploying such a system. Empirical study on "effective" methodologies for requirements analysis fo...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we describe our work for the past year assisting a nurse-managed primary clinic that serves a medically-disadvantaged urban population. Building on the prior year’s work in which our team became acquainted with the mission and goals of the clinic, the community characteristics and the current challenges facing the implementation of t...
Article
There is a scarcity of research on the impact of trauma team member communication on performance. Anecdotal evidence tells of "talking to the air"--asking for tasks to be completed by no one in particular. Human factors techniques were used to analyze the communication patterns in trauma team performance. Video of trauma cases were observed and ana...
Article
Full-text available
To identify the types and extent of workaround strategies with the use of Bar Code Medication Administration (BCMA) in acute care and long-term care settings. Medication errors are the most commonly documented cause of adverse events in hospital settings. Scanning of bar codes to verify patient and medication information may reduce medication error...
Chapter
Full-text available
Background: The success of clinical information systems depends upon their effective integration into complex work systems involving distributed responsibility and decisionmaking. Human-computer interaction (HCI) deficiencies and mismatches between systems design and the structure of work create the potential for new paths to system failures (e.g.,...
Article
Full-text available
In 1998, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations identified important contributors to surgical site misidentification in the operating room (OR), including communication breakdown between surgical team members and the patient, availability of pertinent information, failure of OR policies and procedures, incomplete patient...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This research involved evaluating a PDA application developed to provide a more mobile version of an existing Veterans Administration software program called BCMA (Bar Code Medication Administration). The original application was designed to be operable from a wireless desktop or laptop computer situated on a cart and connected with a bar code scan...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in developing video-based methods to evaluate the usefulness and usability of computerised tools in healthcare. In this paper, we propose a human-computer interaction evaluation method that protects the confidentiality of patient information and reduces litigation risks for participants by embedding and analysing performan...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2000, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has pioneered the development and deployment of a bar-code medication administration (BCMA) system. Based on VHA experience, 15 "best practices" for BCMA implementation, integration, and maintenance are recommended. Data were collected on potential barriers to the effectiveness of BCMA to improve...
Article
Since 2000, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has pioneered the development and deployment of a bar-code medication administration (BCMA) system. Based on VHA experience, 15 “best practices” for BCMA implementation, integration, and maintenance are recommended.
Article
In this paper, we explore how the use of a software package, Bar Code Medication Administration (BCMA), differs in acute care and long-term care settings. Direct observation of BCMA use during medication administration was conducted on acute care (42 hours) and long-term care (37 hours) wards in a small, medium, and large hospital. The following di...
Article
Full-text available
HeartCare: an Internet-based information and support system for patient home recovery after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery HeartCare is an Internet-based information and support service for patients recovering at home from coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The system is designed to meet the nursing challenges in health infor...
Article
In this paper, we describe issues regarding the design of non-desktop interfaces for health informatics information exchange. These issues can be described as "at the screen" CHI issues, and the potentially more critical "beyond the screen" issues of the social context of technology development.
Conference Paper
In this paper, we describe issues regarding the design of non-desktop interfaces for health informatics information exchange. These issues can be described as "at the screen" CHI issues, and the potentially more critical "beyond the screen" issues of the social context of technology development.

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