• Home
  • Michelle Mckemey
Michelle Mckemey

Michelle Mckemey
Melaleuca Environmental Consultancy Services

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
4,618
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
93
Citations
Introduction
Michelle McKemey is an ecologist, consultant, researcher, guest speaker and best-selling author whose work features in international scientific journals, Time Magazine and on the ABC. With her Aboriginal collaborators, Michelle was awarded the Ecological Society of Australia national award for ‘Right-way Science’ 2019 & 2020, and the CSIRO award for Indigenous Engagement 2017. Michelle received the University of New England Chancellor's Doctoral Research Medal in 2021.
Additional affiliations
April 2014 - present
University of New England (Australia)
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Lamont (2022) reassessed our data (McKemey et al. 2021b) related to the population dynamics of Grevillea scortechinii subsp. sarmentosa, in response to different types of fire. The original data were collected through our ongoing cross-cultural research and presented in our paper, 'Indigenous cultural burning had less impact than wildfire on the th...
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary Indigenous cultural fire management facilitates opportunities for Indigenous peoples to connect to and manage their Country, as well as providing scope for research. Right‐way science is defined as collaborative process of bringing Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge and methods together to create ethical, productive and mutual...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A green paper is a preliminary report published to stimulate discussion, which details specific issues, and then points out possible courses of action in terms of policy and legislation. This green paper outlines principles for enhanced collaboration between land and emergency management agencies (‘agencies’) and First Nations peoples in southern A...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous self-determination, land rights and caring for Country programs are enabling Indigenous peoples across the world to re-establish customary roles in biodiversity conservation and cultural fire management. In Australia, Indigenous-controlled lands form the majority of the protected area estate, harbour almost 60% of listed threatened speci...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous knowledge emphasises the importance of cultural connections between humans and the biophysical world. In the face of threats to the maintenance and transfer of Indigenous knowledge, novel approaches such as seasonal calendars are emerging as tools to share knowledge and guide management of natural and cultural resources. The renewal of I...
Thesis
Full-text available
Indigenous cultural fire management is being renewed in many parts of the world. This research considered how cross-cultural knowledge can support this renewal. Indigenous rangers and Western scientists worked together to co-produce fire and seasons calendars to inform cultural burning and adaptive management of Indigenous Protected Areas. Quantita...
Preprint
Full-text available
Indigenous cultural fire management is being recognised and revived across Australia, primarily in the centre and across the north. To explore the benefits of contemporary cultural fire management in southeast Australia and barriers to its revival, we undertook a systematic analysis of the literature. Seventy documented applications of cultural fir...
Article
Full-text available
In her work with Indigenous communities, ecologist Michelle McKemey sees many cultural and conservation benefits from traditional burning practices.
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous fire management is experiencing a resurgence worldwide. Northern Australia is the world leader in Indigenous savanna burning, delivering social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits. In 2016, a greenhouse gas abatement fire program commenced in the savannas of south-eastern Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory, managed by the I...
Research
Full-text available
Many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia are undergoing a revival of ‘cultural burning’, reintroducing fire on to lands that have not been burnt using Aboriginal fire management methods for many years. The Banbai Aboriginal Nation are reintroducing cultural burning at Wattleridge Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) in northern NSW and undertaki...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Our research aims to describe the reintroduction of cultural burning at Wattleridge Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) in New South Wales Australia, owned by the Banbai Aboriginal Nation, and considers the ecological and cultural changes that occur when fire is reintroduced to a long unburnt ecosystem. Through participatory action research, semi-struc...
Poster
Full-text available
The 'Yugul Mangi Faiya En Sisen Kelenda' (Yugul Mangi Fire and Seasons Calendar) was developed by Indigenous Elders and Yugul Mangi Rangers in collaboration with non-Indigenous scientists, for the cross-cultural interpretation of savanna burning in the South East Arnhem Land (SEAL) Indigenous Protected Area (IPA), Northern Territory, Australia. The...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, Indigenous cultural burning has been practiced for millennia, although colonization limited Indigenous people’s ability to access and manage their ancestral lands. Recently, recognition of Indigenous fire management has been increasing, leading to the re-emergence of cultural burning in Australia, the Americas, parts of Asia and Africa. W...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This case study examines the potential impacts of climate change and sea level rise on the South Alligator River system, one of Australia’s most valued, natural, and cultural landscapes. The South Alligator River is located within the Northern Territory’s Kakadu National Park which receives international recognition and is listed as a World Herita...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
PhD research working collaboratively with Indigenous communities to develop cross-cultural ecological knowledge to support Indigenous cultural fire management.
Project
Winba = Fire, the Wattleridge Fire and Seasons calendar, has been developed through collaborative research between Banbai traditional owners and PhD researcher Michelle McKemey. The Fire and Seasons calendar uses ‘biocultural indicators’- noticeable, predictable, seasonal events that may be culturally significant- to tell us when the seasons are changing, and when it is a good time to burn. http://www.firesticks.org.au/winba-fire-the-wattleridge-ipa-fire-and-seasons-calendar/