Michelle Marraffini

Michelle Marraffini
University of Canterbury | UC · School of Biological Sciences

Masters of Science in Marine Science

About

8
Publications
3,598
Reads
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169
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
University of Canterbury
Position
  • PhD Student
May 2014 - August 2017
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC)
Position
  • Technician
September 2010 - May 2014
Moss Landing Marine Labs
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2010 - December 2013
Moss Landing Marine Labs
Field of study
  • Invertebrate Zoology and Molecular Ecology
August 2006 - May 2010
University of Florida
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Significance Theoretical models of population dynamics have shown the counterintuitive conclusion that harvest can increase the equilibrium size of a population. These models of increases in response to mortality have been considered for fisheries harvest and removal of non-native species and can be driven by density-dependent overcompensation. Thi...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Great Japan Tsunami of 2011 resulted in an unprecedented dispersal event of marine biota from Asian coastal waters to the Pacific shores of North America. While significant effort has focused on characterizing the spatial and temporal patterns of biota arriving to North America, the fate of these organisms and the extent of new invasions are po...
Article
Full-text available
More non-native species (NNS) are reported from harbors, estuaries and protected embayments than in wave-exposed, open-coast habitats. In California (USA), hundreds of NNS have become established in international ports, and dozens are known from smaller estuaries. In contrast, only 22 NNS are reported from the state’s 1350 km of open coast. As a re...
Article
Full-text available
Non-indigenous species (NIS) are one of the leading forces of change in coastal marine ecosystems and are often associated with fouling communities, especially the artificial structures of marinas and ports. As a result, monitoring of marine fouling communities is crucial to evaluate the introduction and spread of NIS as well as assess the efficacy...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic vectors have moved marine species around the world leading to increased invasions and expanded species' ranges. The biotic resistance hypothesis of Elton (in The ecology of invasions by animals and plants, 1958) predicts that more diverse communities should have greater resistance to invasions, but experiments have been equivocal. We...
Article
Full-text available
We have previously shown that autophagy is required for chronological longevity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we examine the requirements for autophagy during extension of chronological life span (CLS) by calorie restriction (CR). We find that autophagy is upregulated by two CR interventions that extend CLS: water wash CR and...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how non-dividing cells remain viable over long periods of time, which may be decades in humans, is of central importance in understanding mechanisms of aging and longevity. The long-term viability of non-dividing cells, known as chronological longevity, relies on cellular processes that degrade old components and replace them with new...

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