Michelle E. Kelly

Michelle E. Kelly
National College of Ireland · School of Business, IFSC, Dublin 1

BA Hons, D.Psych.BAT

About

34
Publications
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Introduction
I am a lecturer in Psychology in the Department of Psychology, National College of Ireland. I conduct research in Applied Behaviour Analysis, Relational Frame Theory (RFT), Cognitive Psychology and Healthy Ageing. My current projects include researching computerised brain training interventions for people with early stage dementia and RFT approaches to improving cognitive and mental health outcomes.
Additional affiliations
November 2011 - June 2014
Trinity College Dublin
Position
  • Early Intervention Coordinator
Description
  • Researching interventions for people in the early stages of dementia; developing and delivering evidence-based early interventions; reviewing lifestyle interventions for healthy older adults.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The aim of the current project is to use the IRAP, a measure of relational responding, as a supplement to traditional subjective questionnaires in assessing attitudes towards (i) children with autism, (ii) students with ADHD and anxiety, (iii) bullying in schools and colleges, (iv) beauty bias in employment, and (v) alcohol consumption.
Project
The present study extends previous research by the current authors which found that the construct of ‘wanting more’ was significantly associated with increased materialism, reduced life satisfaction, and negative affect in a sample of University students. The purpose of the current research is to explore whether the same cognitive processes might underpin addictive behaviour. Specifically, this study aims to assess implicit and explicit biases towards ‘wanting more’ in a sample of individuals engaged with addiction services versus a healthy control sample.