Michele Zappavigna

Michele Zappavigna
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of the Arts and Media

PhD

About

93
Publications
59,039
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,967
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on how people enact ambient affiliation through the language they use in social media environments. More info at michelezappavigna.com Methods include corpus-based discourse analysis, Systemic Functional Linguistics, and multimodal discourse analysis.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2003 - present
The University of Sydney

Publications

Publications (93)
Article
Full-text available
This article explores how language is used to build community with the microblogging service, Twitter (www.twitter.com). Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL), a theory of language use in its social context, is employed to analyse the structure and meaning of ‘tweets’ (posts to Twitter) in a corpus of 45,000 tweets collected in the 24 hours after th...
Book
Social Media is fast becoming a key area of linguistic research. This highly accessible guidebook leads students through the process of undertaking research in order to explore the language that people use when they communicate on social media sites. This textbook provides: An introduction to the linguistic frameworks currently used to analyse la...
Article
Full-text available
An important dimension of social media discourse is its searchability. A key semiotic resource supporting this function is the hashtag, a form of social tagging that allows microbloggers to embed metadata in social media posts. While popularly thought of as topic-markers, hashtags are able to construe a range of complex meanings in social media tex...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores how we use social media to construe identities and align with others into communities of shared values. The focus is on how ‘users of language perform their identities within uses of language’: How do personae using the microblogging service Twitter perform relational identities as they enact discourse fellowships? Addressing...
Article
Full-text available
The digital age is characterised by unprecedented access to technologies to understand our bodies, genetics and family histories. The last decade has seen a growing uptake of direct-to-consumer DNA testing, which is (re)shaping individuals’ identity narratives. Drawing on data from a national online survey with Australian donor-conceived people (N...
Article
Criticizing the discourse of politicians via social media platforms is currently a major way in which people engage with civic and political issues, and foster social alignments around shared values through ambient affiliation. This paper explores the pragmatic and social functions of particular forms of ironic quotation that social media users emp...
Article
This paper explores the role of a particular set of commonly occurring temporal meanings relating to the shared experience of being in a pandemic (e.g., in these unprecedented times) and how these foster ambient affiliation on Twitter. Temporal meanings can be realised as a range of grammatical structures in texts and are linguistic resources that...
Article
Full-text available
This paper applies a social semiotic framework for exploring the functions of emoji in digital discourse about working from home (WFH). This is an important and prevalent discourse in the on-going COVID-19 pandemic due to widespread ‘lockdowns’ aimed at reducing the spread of the virus which have had a profound impact upon how and where people work...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a social semiotic analysis of emoji-language semiosis. Combining the theoretical architecture of Systemic Functional Linguistics and methodology of Multimodal Discourse Analysis, we propose an analytical framework that can identify how emoji make meaning both individually and in interaction with language. Using the web-based c...
Article
This paper explores communing affiliation and out-grouping in a corpus of Trump’s tweets about Iran. Communing is a form of ‘ambient affiliation’ ( Zappavigna 2011 ) which offers a way of understanding how Trump attempts to build alignments with his audience without necessarily directly engaging with them, since he tends to ignore replies to his tw...
Article
Full-text available
The drive to make our discourse readily findable by others has become a prominent social process, realised by a range of online communicative practices associated with social media. A key semiotic resource integral to microblogging is the hashtag, a form of social tagging that allows microbloggers to embed metadata in posts. This 'conversational ta...
Preprint
Full-text available
Zappavigna, M. (2021). Ambient affiliation in comments on YouTube videos: Communing around values about ASMR. Journal of Foreign Languages. 44(1), 21-40.
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores how ideological positions associated with food are construed multimodally in Instagram posts produced by everyday social media users. Discourse about food choices is an important site for revealing syndromes of values that characterise the ideological positions that are embedded in everyday life. An example of a highly valued fo...
Article
This paper argues that paralinguistic resources employed by stand-up comedians to construe textual personae (impersonated characters) make a substantial contribution to the creation of humor by allowing the comedian to distance themselves from particular social values and by referencing shared cultural stereotypes. A stretch of stand-up comedy disc...
Article
Full-text available
Deceptive communication and misinformation are crucial issues that are currently having a significant impact on social life. Parallel to the important work of identifying misinformation on digital platforms is understanding why such material proliferates. One approach to answering this question is to attempt to understand the values that are being...
Article
Full-text available
Linguistic analysis of the interpersonal patterning of threatening communication is a means of uncovering the attitudes, ideological orientation, and hostile intentions of perpetrators of violence in terrorist discourse ( Gales 2010 , 2011 ). Corpus analysis focused on attitudinal meaning also offers a diagnostic for characterizing the personal and...
Article
Full-text available
Recent work on algorithmic bias has shown that understanding the values embedded in technology design processes is important for avoiding social harm. This paper explores the attitudes construed in whitepapers of blockchain technology start-ups. Blockchain technology is a relatively new phenomenon that has informed discourses about the future of go...
Article
This article explores how digital intimacy is construed through ambient embodied copresence in ‘personal attention’ role play videos, a type of Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) video that has become popular on YouTube. ASMR is the experience of positive sensations in response to visual and aural stimuli. Online video sharing platforms ha...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This paper develops a framework for analysing paralanguage, initially inspired by systemic functional linguistic (hereafter SFL) research on early child language development. A distinction is drawn between non-semiotic behaviour (somasis) and meaning (semiosis), and within semiosis between language and paralanguage (using the term paralang...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a social semiotic analysis of a stand-up comedy text. Its aim is to explore how dialogic resources contribute to humour. The research is informed by the concept of affiliation in Systemic Functional Linguistic theory and work on interactional humour. Laughter is treated as a marker for the deferral of social values that create n...
Article
The affordances of social media platforms have generated an intensified focus on the daily lives and activities of individuals. Instagram is an extremely popular platform, particularly in relation to the ‘selfie’, which has led to a growing body of research in relation to selfie types and the different subjective and intersubjective relations they...
Preprint
Full-text available
Selfies are self-portraits typically taken with the front camera of a mobile device. This chapter considers how these images are recontextualised across different social contexts. While most research has focused on selfies that directly depict the photographer’s face, we consider how what we term ‘implied/inferred selfies’ and ‘still life self-imag...
Article
This paper explores how people present their relationship to their domestic objects in decluttering vlogs on YouTube, where they show the process of getting rid of undesired items. These videos are associated with discourses of ‘minimalism’ that are currently prevalent on social media platforms. The paper adopts a multimodal social semiotic approac...
Preprint
Full-text available
To appear as Zappavigna, M. (forthcoming). “And then he said… no one has more respect for women than I do”: Intermodal relations and intersubjectivity in image macros. In H. Stöckl, H. Caple, & J. Pflaeging (Eds.), Image-Centric Practices in the Contemporary Media Sphere. London: Routledge.
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews the way in which Convenors and participants enact conferencing as a staged goal-oriented social process. In doing so, it highlights the fact that there is a range of work to be done, entailing that a number of complementary elemental genres have to be brought together in a macro-genre involving steps and sub-steps alongside the...
Chapter
This chapter explores how the Convenor manages the conferencing macro-genre as a communicative interaction featuring multiple participants. It surveys how exchange structures operate in the conference, in particular focusing on the joint construction of the commissioned recount. The focus on exchange structures reveals that conferencing is best int...
Chapter
This chapter considers the range of identities made available for Young Persons and Support Persons at critical stages of conferencing (testimony, rejoinder and admonition), adapting Maton’s work on specialization codes. This involves recontextualizing his Epistemic Relation and Social Relation axes from the perspective of ideational and axiologica...
Chapter
This chapter suggests that conference theorists and advocates have been looking in the wrong place when trying to find a way of explaining the transformation that occurs in a conference. Instead of a theory based on personal internal emotional states, the chapter argues for a social semiotic perspective that accounts for the interactive power of th...
Chapter
Full-text available
The focus of this chapter is the relation of feelings to community. Inspired by Knight (2008, 2010, 2013), the idea that belonging involves enacting bonds is explored, with a bond defined as a shared ‘attitude plus ideation’ coupling. This means that looking at how couplings are negotiated as bonds is crucial for understanding the reintegrative pra...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter introduces the approach to restorative justice, which is the focus of this monograph—namely Youth Justice Conferencing in New South Wales, Australia. In Youth Justice Conferences, adolescent offenders meet with their victim and other relevant members of the community to discuss relatively minor offences and work out some form of commun...
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapter focuses on the negotiation of feeling in conferencing, drawing on appraisal to analyse expressions of affect, judgement and appreciation. The generally reticent stance of Young Persons as far as expressing feeling is noted, alongside the work done by Convenors and Youth Liaison Officers to extract feeling. Consideration is then given to...
Article
Full-text available
The selfie is one of the most widely publicized, criticized, and debated visual phenomena of our time. However, formulating a definition of the selfie is not straightforward, as visual clues – be they representational or compositional – alone are not sufficient for identification. Recognizing an image as a selfie, rather than a portrait, often requ...
Article
Full-text available
This book analyses the Youth Justice Conferencing Program in New South Wales, Australia. Exploring this form of diversionary justice from the perspectives of functional linguistics and performance studies, the authors combine close textual analysis with ethnographic research methodologies. They examine how participants use the discourse semantic re...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this paper, we explore the semiotic dimension of digital scrapbooking. In particular, we look at how technological affordances of social media platforms, such as reposting and scrolling functions, facilitate the creation of a unique form of semiotic artefact—curated visual blogs. We argue that the curatorial practices of digital scrapbooking cre...
Article
Full-text available
Social metadata is an important dimension of social media communication, and closely associated with practices such as curating, tagging, and searching content. This article explores how hashtags are used to coordinate and accentuate the values construed in a corpus of Twitter posts (tweets) about depression. In other words, it explores how people...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
This article employs multimodal discourse analysis to explore how mothers represent their everyday experiences of motherhood on Instagram through different forms of self-portraiture. It investigates whether the ‘selfies’ that they share can be characterized as a visual genre and identifies four subgenres: presented, mirrored, inferred and implied s...
Article
As an iconic image of our time, the selfie has attracted much attention in popular media and scholarly writing. The focus so far has been on the representation of the self or subjectivity. We propose a complementary perspective that foregrounds the intersubjective function of the selfie. We argue that the presence of selfhood is often an assumption...
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the language of microblogging by focusing on discourse produced via Twitter, a popular microblogging service. In the first section I consider microblogging as a semiotic practice, trace its historical development and investigate the interdisciplinary research into this form of communication. My focus will be on linguistic work...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores linguistic research into evaluation in social media texts. After a survey of some of the dominant linguistic theories of stance and evaluation, introducing the Appraisal Framework as a model that has been used across a range of social media discourses, it explores work on evaluation in social tagging, focusing on the evaluatio...
Article
This article presents an overview and extension of research into one form of diversionary justice, the Youth Justice Conferencing programme in New South Wales, Australia. Conferences are formal procedures organised by a Convenor and typically involving a young offender, their victim or victim’s representative, support persons, the arresting police...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores interpersonal meaning in social media photographs, using the representation of motherhood in Instagram images as a case study. It investigates the visual choices that are made in these images to construe relationships between the represented participants, the photographer, and the ambient social media viewer. The author draws...
Preprint
Full-text available
Youth Justice Conferencing is a form of diversionary justice for adolescent offenders introduced in New South Wales, Australia in 1997. In Youth Justice Conferences adolescent offenders meet with their victim and other relevant members of the community to discuss relatively minor offences and work out some form of community service by way of repara...
Article
Full-text available
At the heart of Youth Justice Conferencing, a form of restorative justice aimed at addressing youth crime, is the notion that young persons who have committed an offence should be ‘reintegrated’ into their communities (Braithwaite in Crime, shame and reintegration. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1989). This paper focuses on the role of pare...
Article
Full-text available
Microblogging is an increasingly prevalent communicative practice for negotiating identity and engaging in networked publics. It is currently of particular interest to new media and communication theorists, due to the lens it provides to view 'real-time' expression of online opinion and sentiment about both public events and domestic life. While ma...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores how we use social media to communicate our experience of the world and bond with others by forming communities of shared values. Microblogging services such as Twitter and Weibo are a form of social media allowing users to publish streams of length-delimited posts to internet-mediated audiences. As such they afford new kinds o...
Article
Full-text available
This paper offers a multimodal perspective on how identities are performed and negotiated in discourse, concentrating on the interaction of language and body language within a particular genre, Youth Justice Conferencing. These conferences operate as a diversionary form of sentencing in the juvenile justice system of New South Wales, Australia. Typ...
Article
Full-text available
Youth justice conferencing is one of a number of programs which have been introduced into western legal systems in recent years, typically under the banner of a ‘restorative justice’ reform movement. These conferences bring young people (who have admitted their guilt), victims and other parties into a face-to-face meeting in which the impact of the...
Article
Full-text available
The assumption that tacit knowledge cannot be articulated remains dominant in knowledge elicitation. This paper, however, claims that linguistic theory does not support such a position and that language should not be factored out of accounts of tacit knowledge. We argue that Polanyi's (1966, p. 4) widely cited notion that ‘we know more than we can...