Michele R. Buzon

Michele R. Buzon
Purdue University | Purdue · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

53
Publications
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1,051
Citations

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
This article presents outcomes from a Workshop entitled “Bioarchaeology: Taking Stock and Moving Forward,” which was held at Arizona State University (ASU) on March 6–8, 2020. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the School of Human Evolution and Social Change (ASU), and the Center for Bioarchaeological Research (CBR, ASU), the Workshop...
Article
This study reports new trace element and Pb and Sr isotope compositions of tooth enamel from archaeological remains at a Medieval (Christian) cemetery located adjacent to the Kushite royal cemetery of El-Kurru, Sudan. The archaeological site of El-Kurru is located along the Nile River on the southern edge of the Nubian Plateau; the bedrock geology...
Chapter
This book illustrates the state-of-the-art in settlement archaeology in Northeast Africa. As reflected in the title "From Microcosm to Macrocosm: Individual households and cities in Ancient Egypt and Nubia", both a micro-approach introducing microhistories of individual sites according to recent archaeological fieldwork incorporating interdisciplin...
Chapter
Tombos is located at the Third Cataract of the Nile River in modern-day Sudan and marks an important literal and figurative boundary between Egyptian and Nubian interaction. During the New Kingdom Period (1400–1050 BCE), the cemetery at Tombos in Upper Nubia exhibits the use of Egyptian mortuary practices, including monumental pyramid complexes, li...
Article
Objective This project investigates two cases of skeletal dysplasia from archaeological excavations of the New Kingdom Period (c. 1400–1050 BCE) portion of the Tombos cemetery in Sudan. Materials: Fair to well-preserved skeletal remains of two individuals, one adult and one juvenile, are examined here. Methods All available skeletal elements were...
Chapter
Full-text available
Burials, Migration and Identity in the Ancient Sahara and Beyond - edited by M. C. Gatto February 2019
Article
Previous research of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr variability in human dental tissue from the Nile Valley has shown diversity in bioavailable strontium across the landscape. Local ranges, determined from faunal sampling, have been suggested for several sites in Nubia, including Tombos (Third Cataract, Sudan). This study builds on previous research by testing human...
Article
Objectives: The current study seeks to determine if a sample of foragers, farmers, and pastoral-ists are distinguishable based on their dental microwear texture signatures. Materials and methods: The study included a sample of 719 individuals from 51 archeological sites (450 farmers, 192 foragers, 77 pastoralists). All were over age 12 and sexes we...
Article
Using morphometric assessment, we diachronically analyse mechanical stress and limb function at the Tombos (modern Sudan) archaeological site through time and changing socioeconomic circumstances. Based on previous research, we expect that during the Third Intermediate/Napatan (c. 1070-656 BCE) people were larger and more physically active than in...
Chapter
Ancient Egypt and Nubia have a long history of interaction that led to both cultural and biological entanglements. Cultural and political boundaries shifted over time, with Egypt absorbing parts of its southern neighbor into an eventually far-reaching empire but also with independent Nubian kingdoms dominating Egypt at different periods, at one poi...
Article
The recent discovery of a well-preserved horse burial at the Third Cataract site of Tombos illuminates the social significance of equids in the Nile Valley. The accompanying funerary assemblage includes one of the earliest securely dated pieces of iron in Africa. The Third Intermediate Period (1050-728 BC) saw the development of the Nubian Kushite...
Chapter
Full-text available
Buzon and Smith depart from some of the chapters in that they examine the relationship between indigenous groups and “more local” foreign powers that are not European but peoples from Ancient Egypt and Nubia in the Third Cataract of the Nile. They bring together mortuary analysis, strontium isotope indicators of geographic origins, biological affin...
Article
Through the concept of entanglement, archaeological indications of cultural identity and skeletal evidence of biological and geographic interaction are used to explore the development of the Nubian polity who ruled as the 25th Dynasty of Egypt (Napatan period, ca. 750–656 B.C.E.). In this article, we examine the ways in which cultural and biologica...
Article
This study examines the consequences of the sociopolitical transition in the Nile Valley from New Kingdom Egyptian control (18–20th Dynasties of Egypt, ∼1550–1069 BC) to Napatan Nubian rule (25th Dynasty of Egypt, ∼750–660 BC) through the analysis of skeletal remains and mortuary ritual at the site of Tombos in Upper Nubia (modern Sudan). Demograph...
Article
Due to its critical location on the Nile River controlling trade from the south, Tombos is an important ancient site to explore the interaction between Egyptians and Nubians. To assess population continuity at Tombos through sociopolitical transitions, the appendicular skeleton of people from the New Kingdom and Napatan periods was examined. Using...
Article
Full-text available
As a successful technique for identifying residential mobility in other areas, this study investigates the feasibility of using (87) Sr/(86) Sr analysis to track the movements of the ancient peoples of Egypt and Nubia in the Nile Valley, who interacted via trade, warfare, and political occupations over millennia. Dental enamel from faunal remains i...
Article
Traumatic injuries to the scapula have received little attention in the paleopathological literature. They are rarely encountered in medical emergencies today due to the overlying muscles that protect the bone; they comprise just 1% of all fractures. This collaborative project brings together five cases of bilateral fractures of the scapulae in fou...
Article
The development of complex societies, irrigation agriculture and sociopolitical transitions are of interest to researchers working in the Nasca region on the south coast of Peru. Occupied for thousands of years, many questions regarding the circumstances of these changes in the area are being investigated. Oxygen isotope analysis provides a method...
Article
Human sacrifice in the Inca Empire at times took the form of the capacocha, a sacrificial rite involving the most beautiful children in the empire. In this study, we investigate a possible capacocha at the pre-Columbian site of Choquepukio in the Cuzco Valley of Peru. During excavations at Choquepukio in 2004, seven children (aged 3–12 years) were...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses a bioarchaeological approach to examine the cultural and biological relationships between two groups who lived in ancient Nubia during the Bronze Age, C-Group and Kerma. While archaeological evidence indicates that these groups show many cultural similarities, reflections of behaviors such as pottery use and mortuary practices sugge...
Article
This study examines the feasibility of using oxygen isotope analysis of tooth carbonate to identify immigrants from the New Kingdom site of Tombos in Nubia (n = 30). In comparison with published data, the results (δ18Oca,VSMOW = 31.4‰) imply a substantial presence of immigrants. However, further analysis of these data strongly suggests the need to...
Article
Full-text available
During the several thousand years of human occupation in the Nasca drainage on the south coast of Peru, population movement into and out of the region impacted the formation and organization of society, as well as contributed to major cultural transformations. This study identifies foreign versus local individuals through the investigation of buria...
Article
Although Spanish chroniclers referred frequently to coerced migration in the Inca Empire, these migrations have been difficult to document archaeologically. One approach to migration studies, strontium isotope ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) analysis, has emerged as an effective technique. Until now, however, this method has not been applied to the Inca heartland re...
Article
This study examines evidence for dental disease (caries, abscesses, antemortem tooth loss and severity of dental wear) in Nubian and Egyptian groups living in the Nile Valley during the New Kingdom. Specific attention is given to individuals buried at the site of Tombos, a cemetery in Nubia used during the Egyptian colonial occupation. In addition,...
Article
This analysis examines heterogeneity in risks by assessing the health status of individuals in two distinct burial contexts from the Nubian site of Kerma: sacrificial (n = 100) and nonsacrificial (n = 190) burial areas dated to the classic Kerma period ( approximately 1750-1500 BC). Indicators of physiological stress that were examined include crib...
Article
Trace element and Sr isotope data were obtained by laser ablation- and solution mode-(MC)-ICP-MS analysis for tooth enamel from remains excavated at the New Kingdom period Egyptian colonial and Nubian cemetery site of Tombos (Sudan). Elemental abundances determined by both methods of ICP-MS analysis yielded comparable values; however, 87Sr/86Sr val...
Article
During the New Kingdom, Egypt began a military campaign to regain command over Nubia. Extremely successful, their control extended to the fourth cataract by the time of Thutmose III. The circumstances of this power, however, are not well known. It is unclear whether Egyptian colonists or locals administered Nubia during this time. Using a bioarchae...
Article
During the New Kingdom, Egypt began a military campaign to regain command over Nubia. Extremely successful, their control extended to the fourth cataract by the time of Thutmose III. The circumstances of this power, however, are not well known. It is unclear whether Egyptian colonists or locals administered Nubia during this time. Using a bioarchae...
Article
The value of strontium isotope analysis in identifying immigrants at numerous archaeological sites and regional areas has been demonstrated by several researchers, usually by comparing 87Sr/86Sr values of human tooth enamel and/or bone with the local strontium isotope signature determined by faunal and environmental samples. This paper examines the...
Article
As circumstances of conquest change, leaders of empires must adapt their colonial strategies in order to be successful. One example of such modification in approach is the shift from Middle Kingdom to New Kingdom Egyptian colonial activities in Nubia. During the Middle Kingdom (2050-1650 BC) Egypt used aggressive military campaigns to subdue the st...
Article
Past studies of culture contact have often used the concepts of unidirectional modification of a subordinate population by a socially dominant group. Reevaluations of these ideas suggest that this paradigm is not appropriate for all situations. The examination of power relations in such alternative circumstances provides insights into human agency,...
Article
During the New Kingdom period, Egypt succeeded in occupying most of Nubia. Colonial towns were built, which served as centers of government and redistribution. This paper uses a bioarchaeological approach to address the effects of this cultural contact on non-elites. Skeletal remains from the site of Tombos (N = 100), a cemetery in Upper Nubia dati...
Article
Osteochondroma is one of the most common bone tumours found in clinical cases. These tumours usually occur on the metaphyseal surfaces of the bone; approximately 80% of osteochondromas are found on one of the limbs. Only about 5% of cases are located on the pelvis. This study examines two cases of single osteochondroma on the os pubis from Tombos,...
Article
Burials from the Legion of Honor cemetery provide osteological evidence of the living conditions experienced by economically disadvantaged people who died in San Francisco during the last half of the 19th century. Comparisons suggest their lives were similar to those of other lower-class 19th-century Americans. Rapid population growth, overcrowded...
Article
Prehistoric health in the Southwestern United States and the effects of subsistence change are topics of continued research and debate. This study examines the patterns of health and disease in a population (n = 29) from the SU site in New Mexico, dated a.d. 450–;550, and uses paleopathological tools to determine the intensity of maize agriculture...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project will investigate the impact of climate change on the isotopic signature of bioavailable strontium during the last ~4,000 years within the Nile River Valley. This project builds on previous research collaborations by both principal investigators that have established immigration patterns and cultural interactions in ancient civilizations for Egyptian and Nubian sites within the Nile River Valley based primarily on strontium isotope signatures of archaeological faunal (soil, animal, plant) and human samples. The results from this first time, detailed investigation will accurately trace any temporal change in the regional distribution of bioavailable strontium driven by a drying climate within the Nile River Valley.
Project
This project will investigate the impact of climate change on the isotopic signature of bioavailable strontium during the last ~4,000 years within the Nile River Valley. This project builds on previous research collaborations by both principal investigators that have established immigration patterns and cultural interactions in ancient civilizations for Egyptian and Nubian sites within the Nile River Valley based primarily on strontium isotope signatures of archaeological faunal (soil, animal, plant) and human samples. The results from this first time, detailed investigation will accurately trace any temporal change in the regional distribution of bioavailable strontium driven by a drying climate within the Nile River Valley.
Project