Michał Filipiak

Michał Filipiak
Jagiellonian University | UJ · Institute of Environmental Sciences

Ph.D.
How to help wild bees: nutrient demand and supply in a changing environment (3-min. video) https://youtu.be/OsNImYspsPo

About

36
Publications
21,742
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Citations
Introduction
I use ecological stoichiometry to study the limitations imposed on organisms due to mismatches between their nutritional demands and the supply of nutrients in their environment. My work focuses on two examples of herbivore life histories shaped by the stoichiometries of their food, representing the extremes of feeding strategies: (1) nutrient-deficient dead wood exploited by xylophages and (2) nutrient-rich pollen used by bees. See 3-minute video abstract : https://youtu.be/6iaEyuO9Hz4
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - present
Jagiellonian University
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
The application of ionomics and ecological stoichiometry benefits conservation biology with necessary ecological and evolutionary relevance, allowing unresolved problems to be addressed. The use of ionomics and ecological stoichiometry enables consideration that changes in the environmental nutritional supply affect the ecophysiology, behavior, hea...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated nutrition as a potential mechanism underlying the link between floral diversity/composition and wild bee performance. The health, resilience, and fitness of bees may be limited by a lack of nutritionally balanced larval food (pollen), influencing the entire population, even if adults are not limited nutritionally by the availability...
Chapter
Full-text available
Dead wood is rich in sugars and can serve as an energy source when digested, but it lacks other nutrients, preventing the growth, development, and maturation of saproxylophages (saproxylic organisms that consume dead wood at any stage of decomposition). Split into atoms, sugars only serve as a source of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, thereby providi...
Article
Full-text available
Pollen rains may temporally mitigate nutritional limitations experienced by terrestrial and aquatic detritivores by supplying stoichiometrically balanced food during periods of detritivore growth and development (spring-summer). This may affect the functioning of food webs and thus influence fundamental processes, e.g., by enabling fungi to decompo...
Article
Full-text available
Wild bee populations are declining due to human activities, such as land use, which strongly affect the composition and diversity of available plants and food sources. The chemical composition of food (i.e. nutrition), in turn, determines health, resilience and fitness of bees. However, for pollinators, the term health is recent and subject to deba...
Article
Full-text available
To predict the quantity and quality of food available to pollinators in various landscapes over time, it is necessary to collect detailed data on the pollen, nectar, and sugar production per unit area and the flowering phenology of plants. Similar data are needed to estimate the contribution of plants to the functioning of food webs via the flow of...
Data
3-minute video explaining why bee-friendly seed mixes should be composed considering mismatches between the proportions of nutrients offered by local flora and the nutritional needs of wild bees.
Article
Full-text available
1. Honey bees require minerals for a complete diet. However, minerals from flowers can be inadequate in concentration and composition. Therefore, honey bees may drink ‘dirty water’ from natural sources such as puddles. Some research has attempted to simulate this through honey bee bioassays, but to date, these have tested minerals individually, not...
Preprint
Local and global changes affect which pollen varieties are available to bees in the environment. Therefore, wild bees cannot always access the optimally balanced diet required for their survival. Our feeding experiment showed that the nutritional quality of the pollen diet eaten by bee larvae is shaped not by pollen diversity but by a specific poll...
Preprint
We investigated nutrition as a potential mechanism underlying the link between floral diversity/composition and wild bee performance. The health, resilience, and fitness of bees may be limited by a lack of nutritionally balanced larval food (pollen), influencing the entire population, even if adults are not limited nutritionally by the availability...
Article
Full-text available
Life histories of species may be shaped by nutritional limitations posed on populations. Yet, populations contain individuals that differ according to sex and life stage, each of which having different nutritional demands and experiencing specific limitations. We studied patterns of resource assimilation, allocation and excretion during the growth...
Article
Full-text available
Bee nutrition studies have focused on food quantity rather than quality, and on details of bee biology rather than on the functioning of bees in ecosystems. Ecological stoichiometry has been proposed for studies on bee nutritional ecology as an ecosystem-oriented approach complementary to traditional approaches. It uses atomic ratios of chemical el...
Article
Full-text available
Nutritional limitations may shape populations and communities of organisms. This phenomenon is often studied by treating populations and communities as pools of homogenous individuals with average nutritional optima and experiencing average constraints and trade-offs that influence their fitness in a standardized way. However, populations and commu...
Preprint
Nutritional limitations may shape populations and communities of organisms. This phenomenon is often studied by treating populations and communities as pools of homogenous individuals with average nutritional optima and experiencing average constraints and trade-offs that influence their fitness in a standardized way. However, populations and commu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Nutritional limitations may shape populations and communities of organisms. This phenomenon is often studied by treating populations and communities as pools of homogenous individuals with average nutritional optima and experiencing average constraints and trade-offs that influence their fitness in a standardized way. However, populations and commu...
Article
Full-text available
The interaction of antlions and ants is postulated to be a predator-prey interaction in which the involved parties coevolve. Here, we investigated two issues of potential significance in terms of antlions and ants imposing selective pressures on one another. First, we determined whether trap-building antlions and sand-dwelling ants closely co-occur...
Article
Full-text available
1. Bee-friendly plants are defined by the quantity of food they produce and the visitation rates of adult insects foraging for nectar. However, it is pollen nutritional quality that enables proper larval development of bees, affecting their populations. Not all plants produce pollen that satisfies the nutritional requirements of bee larvae, and we...
Article
Full-text available
The observed decline in wild bees may be connected to the decreasing diversity of flowering plants. Changes in floral composition shape nutrient availability in inhabited areas, and bee larvae need food rich in body-building nutrients to develop into adults. Adult food, mainly composed of energy-rich nectar, differs from larval food, mainly compose...
Presentation
Floral resource limitation connected with land degradation and habitat loss was identified as potential threat that cause pollinator decline and food resource quality may be the main limiting factor for bee populations. To better understand the nutritional constraints of growing and developing organisms, their colonies and populations, ecological s...
Article
Full-text available
The least understood aspects of the nutritional needs of bees are the elemental composition of pollen and the bees' need for a stoichiometrically balanced diet containing the required proportions of nutrients. Reduced plant diversity has been proposed as an indirect factor responsible for the pollinator crisis. We suggest stoichiometric mismatch re...
Data
All of the pollen taxa composing the studied PPMs. % indicates the percentage of grains of a particular taxon in the total counted number of pollen grains in a particular PPM. (XLSX)
Data
Measured relative element contents in 9 pollen pellet morphospecies (PPMs, 12 elements). (XLSX)
Data
Trophic stoichiometric ratios (TSRx = (C:X)Pollen/(C:X)Bee), where C = Carbon content and X = Content of element x in bees and the potential biomass source of larvae. Means, maxima, minima and percentiles were estimated using randomized resampling (N = 3000). TSR values above 4 denote limitations on development. Yellow indicates the values above th...
Data
Measured relative element contents in 3 honeybee castes/sexes (12 elements). (XLSX)
Data
Absolute element contents in 3 honeybee castes/sexes (12 elements). (XLSX)
Data
Concentrations of elements in various hand-collected pollen and honey bee-collected pollen pellets, as reported in the literature. All the values are given in ppm d.m. Full citations are given in the second sheet. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Predation at the nesting site can significantly affect solitary bees’ reproductive success. We tested female red mason bees’ (Osmia bicornis L.) acceptance of potential nesting sites, some of which were marked with cues coming from predated conspecifics (crushed bees) or from a predator itself (rodent excreta). In our experiment, females did not av...
Article
Full-text available
The energy budget of organisms is a primary factor used to generate hypotheses in ecosystem ecology and evolutionary theory. Therefore, previous studies have focused on the energy costs and benefits of adaptations, the efficiency of energy acquisition and investment, and energy budget limitations. The maintenance of stoichiometric balance is equall...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examines the adaptive strategy used by wood-boring beetles to compensate for the lack of nutrients in dead wood. The contents of nutritional elements in growing wood-boring beetles (Stictoleptura rubra L. and Chalcophora mariana Dejean) are compared with the elemental composition of decaying dead wood (pine stumps), showing change...
Article
Full-text available
Learning abilities are exhibited by many animals, including insects. However, sedentary species are typically believed to have low capacities and requirements for learning. Despite this view, recent studies show that even such inconspicuous organisms as larval antlions, which employ an ambush predation strategy, are capable of learning, although th...
Article
Full-text available
The elements present in dead pine stumps inhabited by larvae of wood-boring beetles (Stictoleptura rubra, Arhopalus rusticus and Chalcophora mariana) were analyzed over the initial (first 5 years; a chronosequence) stages of wood decay. The quantities of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu and Na (but not S) increased with increases in the content of e...
Poster
Full-text available
It is widely accepted that the major factor affecting the evolutionary optimization of animal life histories is energy balance, therefore studies focus on the energy costs and benefits of adaptations, the efficiency of energy acquisition and investment, and limits to energy budgets. However, in heterotrophs, equally important seems to be the proble...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of terrestrial biomass is wood, but the elemental composition of its potential consumers, xylophages, differs hugely from that of wood. This causes a severe nutritional imbalance. We studied the stoichiometric relationships of 11 elements (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Na) in three species of pine-xylem-feeding insects, Stictolep...

Questions

Questions (11)
Question
What are potentially huge yet unexamined questions/problems related to pollinator conservation? What basic knowledge do we lack? What knowledge do we have but fail to apply? Do we need to learn more about biology and ecology of pollinators or we should rather focus on undertaking conservation activities (and what kind of activities/actions specifically)?

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
B-GOOD will pave the way towards healthy and sustainable beekeeping within the European Union by following a collaborative and interdisciplinary approach. Merging data from within and around beehives as well as wider socioeconomic conditions, B-GOOD will develop and test innovative tools to perform risk assessments according to the Health Status Index (HSI). B-GOOD has the overall goal to provide guidance for beekeepers and help them make better and more informed decisions. This project receives funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 817622.
Archived project
Organisms that feed on pure dead wood, which consists almost exclusively of hardly digestible polysaccharides, encounter extreme nutritional challenges. Dead-wood eaters are nevertheless able to survive and thrive on this low-quality food source. The aim of this project was to identify the strategy used by saproxylophages to overcome the extreme nutritional poverty of dead wood.
Project
For all bee species, the pollen quality determines the overall quality of the larval food, influences the development of individuals and shapes their populations. However, not all plants produce pollen that fully satisfies the nutritional requirements of bees. Lack of understanding of the nutritional requirements of bees may lead to unintended negative effects of conservation efforts. Ecological stoichiometry provides an approach to better understand the nutritional constraints on growing and developing organisms and their colonies and populations. It makes reference to elements that, if scarce in the environment, prevent the construction of biologically important organic molecules. The least understood aspect of the nutritional requirements of bees concerns stoichiometric balancing and the need for adequate ratios of nutritional elements in consumed food. The goal of this project is to determine the likely limitations imposed on wild bees by the lack of nutritionally balanced pollen. This project asks if and how floral diversity, particularly the accessibility of nutritionally desirable key species, may influence bee populations. Studied are concentrations and stoichiometry of 12 elements (C, N, S, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu) in 2 bee species (mason bee: Osmia bicornis and honeybee: Apis mellifera carnica, considering various castes and sexes) and in their food sources, considering various species of pollen.