Michael Rinderer

Michael Rinderer
University of Freiburg | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg · Institute of Hydrology (IHF)

22.97
 · 
Dr.
About
34
Research items
7,178
Reads
189
Citations
Introduction
Michael Rinderer currently works at the Institute of Hydrology (IHF), University of Freiburg. Michael does research in Hydrology, Ecohydrology, Geomorphology and Natural Hazards. His latest project is on hydrological fluxes and nutrient transport in forest stands.
Research Experience
Jan 2017
University of Freiburg
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Phosphorus Transport in Forest Stands
Apr 2015 - Dec 2016
Duke University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2009 - Apr 2015
University of Zurich
Position
  • PhD & PI
Network
Cited By
Followers
Following
Projects
Projects (3)
Project
Investigating the transport dynamics of SPED tracers in disturbed and undisturbed soils and the impact of preferential flow on the tracer transport. Investigate the temporal and spatial variation of SPED tracers in the vadose zone under saturated conditions (sprinkling) on a forested hillslope.
Project
This project investigates the role of subsurface hydrological fluxes on the redistribution of water and nutrients in forest stands and the uptake of water and phosphorus by beech trees. We compare three different sites that differ in their nutrient availability in terms of their ecosystem nutrition strategies and their ability to recover after large rainfall events. Our project is part of the SPP Ecosystem Nutrition and you can find more information here :https://www.ecosystem-nutrition.uni-freiburg.de/
Research
Research items (34)
Article
Full-text available
The time that water takes to travel through the terrestrial hydrological cycle and the critical zone is of great interest in Earth system sciences with broad implications for water quality and quantity. Most water age studies to date have focused on individual compartments (or sub-disciplines) of the hydrological cycle such as the unsaturated or sa...
Article
Hillslope-stream connectivity significantly affects streamflow and water quality responses during rainfall and snowmelt events, but is difficult to quantify. One approach to quantify subsurface hillslope-stream connectivity is graph theory, which considers linear connections between groundwater measurement sites. We quantified subsurface connectivi...
Presentation
Full-text available
The time water takes to travel through the hydrological cycle is of great interest in earth system sciences because water travel times reflect how water flows through landscapes, with implications for water quality and quantity. To date, most water age studies have focused on the individual compartments of the water cycle such as the unsaturated an...
Poster
Full-text available
Many catchment hydrology studies use stable water isotopes as conservative tracers to track the relative contributions of recent precipitation (event water) in streamflow and to infer dominant runoff processes. Here we present two alternative approaches for using stable water isotopes to better understand how catchments store and release water: est...
Article
Full-text available
Catchment response to precipitation is often investigated using two-component isotope-based hydrograph separation, which quantifies the contribution of precipitation (i.e., event water Qe) or water from storage (i.e., pre-event water Qpe) to total discharge (Q) during storm events. In order to better understand streamflow-generating mechanisms, two...
Preprint
Full-text available
Streamflow response to precipitation is often investigated using isotope-based hydrograph separation, which quantifies the contribution of precipitation (i.e., event water Qe) or water from storage (i.e., pre-event water Qpe) to total discharge (Q) during storm events. In order to better understand streamflow generating mechanisms, hydrograph separ...
Poster
Full-text available
Subsurface Stormflow (SSF) is a well-recognized and important runoff generation process in mountainous catchments in humid climates. Generally Subsurface Stormflow develops in vertical structured soils where the bedrock or a less permeable soil layer is overlaid by a permeable soil layer and vertical percolating water is deflected more or less in a...
Article
Full-text available
While the concept of connectivity has gained popularity in fields like hydrology and ecology, little agreement exists on its definition, which hinders its use in both scientific and legal contexts. In contrast, neuroscientists have developed not only strong conceptualizations of connectivity but also tools to quantify it: a clear distinction is mad...
Article
Full-text available
Runoff generation mechanisms vary between catchments and despite decades of research in many catchments, these mechanisms are still not fully understood. In this paper, runoff generation mechanisms in the steep pre-alpine catchments in the Alptal, Switzerland, are discussed. These fast responding catchments are characterized by low permeability soi...
Article
Full-text available
Information about catchment-scale groundwater dynamics is necessary to understand how catchments store and release water and why water quantity and quality varies in streams. However, groundwater level monitoring is often restricted to a limited number of sites. Knowledge of the factors that determine similarity between monitoring sites can be used...
Article
Groundwater levels in steep headwater catchments typically respond quickly to rainfall but the timing of the response may vary spatially across the catchment. In this study, we investigated the topographic controls and the effect of rainfall and antecedent conditions on the groundwater response timing for 51 groundwater monitoring sites in a 20 ha...
Article
Full-text available
Soil and water management is particularly relevant in semi-arid regions to enhance agricultural productivity. During periods of water scarcity soil moisture differences are important indicators of the soil water deficit and are traditionally used for allocating water resources among farmers of a village community. Here we present a simple, inexpens...
Article
Full-text available
Groundwater levels in steep headwater catchments typically respond quickly to rainfall but the timing of the response may vary spatially across the catchment. In this study, we investigated the topographic controls and the effect of rainfall and antecedent conditions on the groundwater response timing for 51 groundwater monitoring sites in a 20 ha...
Article
Full-text available
Mountainous headwaters consist of different landscape units including forests, meadows and wetlands. In these headwaters it is unclear which landscape units contribute what percentage to baseflow. In this study, we analysed spatiotemporal differences in baseflow isotope and hydrochemistry to identify catchment-scale runoff contribution. Three basef...
Thesis
Soil moisture and groundwater storage are important for understanding and predicting rainfall-runoff processes in watersheds. Research over the last 100 years has revealed detailed process understanding of infiltration and subsurface flow processes, but most studies have been restricted to small plots or hillslopes. However, catchment-scale hydrolo...
Article
Full-text available
Soil and water management is particularly relevant in semi-arid regions to enhance agricultural productivity. During periods of water scarcity soil moisture differences are important indicators of the soil water deficit and are traditionally used for allocating water resources among farmers of a village community. Here we present a simple, inexpens...
Article
Soil moisture and groundwater storage are important for understanding and predicting rainfall-runoff processes in watersheds. Research over the last 100 years has revealed detailed process understanding of infiltration and subsurface flow processes, but most studies have been restricted to small plots or hillslopes. However, catchment-scale hydrolo...
Article
Full-text available
Topographic indices like the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) have been used to predict spatial patterns of average groundwater levels and to model the dynamics of the saturated zone during events (e.g. TOPMODEL). However the assumptions underlying the use of the TWI in hydrological models, of which the most important is that groundwater level varia...
Poster
Full-text available
Für Prognosen zukünftiger Wasserressourcen stellen Gebirgs-Einzugsgebiete eine extra Herausforderung dar. Von allen hydrologischen Systemen sind Quellgebiete und vor allem von Gebirgs-Einzugsgebiete noch wenig erforscht. Leider fehlt es für diese komplexen und variablen Systeme oft an langen und detaillierten Zeitreihen, und auch wenn vorhanden, fe...
Presentation
Full-text available
Out of all hydrological systems, headwaters and especially mountainous catchments are still poorly investigated. For these complex and variable systems long-term detailed data are sparse and even when they exist, internal data are lacking. In our study we investigated a mountainous catchment and tried to quantify internal catchment variability by c...
Article
Full-text available
While soil moisture patterns can be interesting traits to investigate spatio-temporal heterogeneity of catchments relevant for various physical processes of soil-atmosphere interaction and soil water redistribution, many of the existing methods to capture spatial patterns are time-consuming, expensive or need site-specific calibration. Here we pres...
Article
Full-text available
Summary During recent years a hybrid model has been set up for the operational forecasting of flood discharges in the 6750 km2 Tyrolean part of the River Inn catchment in Austria. The catchment can be characterized as a typical alpine area with large variations in altitude. The paper is focused on the error analysis of discharge forecasts of four m...
Chapter
Full-text available
For understanding and predicting rainfall–runoff processes in watersheds, soils and their hydraulic properties play a central role. Experimentalists observe and document hydric soil indicators in detail for more and more sites in various catchments. Modelers, on the other hand, try to break down natural process complexity into models that are based...
Chapter
Full-text available
Successful risk management of flood related hazards like extreme runoff and intense bedload transport in small alpine catchments is strongly dependent on accurate hazard assessment on a local scale. Some currently available methods used by practitioners are simple and therefore result in rather general evidence. Other methods – mostly scientific mo...
Article
Full-text available
For the Tyrolean part of the river Inn, a hybrid model for flood forecast has been set up and is currently in its test phase. The system is a hybrid system which comprises of a hydraulic 1D model for the river Inn, and the hydrological models HQsim (Rainfall-runoff-discharge model) and the snow and ice melt model SES for modeling the rainfall runof...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For hazard Assessment in torrents not only runoff but also bedload transport plays an important role. Besides simple approaches which have been used for decades, more sophisticated, site-specific models are available today to gain distributed results in space and time. However, these results still have to be assessed critically by the experts using...
Conference Paper
For the Tyrolean part of the river Inn, a hybrid model for flood forecast has been set up and is currently in its test phase. The system is a hybrid system which comprises of a hydraulic 1D model for the river Inn, and the hydrological models HQsim (Rainfall-runoff-discharge model) and the snow and ice melt model SES for modeling the rainfall runof...
Conference Paper
The runoff and sediment discharge computational model PROMABGIS Version 1.0 shows a modular structure and is designed as an expert support-system. Within the framework of a process-oriented watershed investigation, the software can be used to estimate runoff and sediment yield for small alpine catchment areas (catchment area < 20 km²). PROMABGIS ha...
Article
In recent times settlements have expanded, traffic and tourist activities have increased in most alpine regions. As a consequence, on the one hand humans and goods are affected by natural hazard processes more often, while on the other hand the demand for protection by both technical constructions and planning measures carried out by public authori...