Michael Orr

Michael Orr
Chinese Academy of Sciences | CAS · Institute of Zoology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

63
Publications
31,678
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651
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, where I have worked for the last three years. I am especially interested in bee taxonomy, evolution, and conservation. I am currently working on global bee distribution, the evolution of mimicry across bees in Asia, and the evolution of the subfamily Anthophorinae, among other directions.
Additional affiliations
June 2021 - September 2021
Institute of Zoology CAS
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Bee evolution, ecology, and conservation.
November 2017 - June 2021
Institute of Zoology CAS
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2012 - November 2017
Utah State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • I have had three semesters of hourly research assistantship work (primarily databasing) and one semester of pure research.
Education
August 2011 - May 2017
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2006 - May 2010
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Entomology

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
We aim to characterize gut microbiota of the bees and understand the role of microbes in host-symbiont interaction as well as in the process of evolution.
Project
The primary aim of this proposal is to use integrative taxonomic studies of bees to advance pollination studies of bees in China and other Asian countries. Specific aims are to: 1) use efficient sequencing technology to obtain DNA barcodes for species trapped or netted from an array of study sites encompassing diverse natural and human modified-habitats, 2) to validate the resulting morphospecies through morphological study including specimen imaging, and 3) to use the results of this integrative taxonomic study to facilitate the first quantitative studies of all bee taxa across representative habitats. Comparable studies in Europe and North America have revealed cryptic diversity, solved long-standing taxonomic problems, and thereby made possible status assessments documenting bee declines. By overcoming a severe taxonomic impediment to Asian bees we can fill a knowledge gap, and our results should be of great interest for global meta-analyses urgently sought by policy makers concerned about how bee declines will affect food security. Hypotheses to be tested include: 1) do China and neighboring countries harbor exceptionally high bee diversity?, 2) Do bees have the same biodiversity hotspots as their angiosperm host plants?, 3) Are bees declining in China and elsewhere in Asia, as has been reported globally?, and 4) Are species or functional groups of key pollinators persisting and continuing to provide valuable ecosystem services or are these threatened? The main methodology will be to apply novel and efficient approaches to field sampling, DNA sequencing, molecular diagnostic and phylogenetic analysis, and ecological analysis to large-scale samples from China and other Asian countries with a shared fauna. The results will be the basis for the first robust publications on Asian bee diversity and conservation and will be of immediate interest to global policy makers seeking to include reliable data for this region in their global assessments.
Project
1. to develop novel protocols/pipelines, combining informative datasets for tree of Hymenoptera; 2. to sequence standard PCR gene markers and omics data from Hymenoptera taxa, especially Apoidea and Chalcidoidea to integrate gene-rich and species-rich information; 3. to conceive novel algorithm from mathematics for more efficient data analyses