Michael Neocosmos

Michael Neocosmos
Rhodes University | RU · Unit for the Humanities UHURU

About

37
Publications
1,821
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837
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
493 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Through a review of the two works below, I discuss how the Saint Domingue/Haiti Revolutions clarify the history of the opposition between popular sovereignty and state sovereignty. The people and the state developed as distinct political actors throughout the nineteenth century in particular. The former constructed a completely new society founded...
Article
Mamdani’s review of my book Thinking Freedom in Africa remains within the analytical binaries which characterise his thinking. As a result he fails completely to comprehend my argument. The problem is compounded by the fact that he seems, at best, to have read the book only partially. I do not oppose “differences” to “universal humanity”, but argue...
Article
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The paper discusses Jane-Anna Gordon's important idea of the Creolization of Poitical Theory with reference to the work of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Frantz Fanon. It makes an argument for synthesizing this initiative with dialectical thought in order to transcend the analytical vision which gave birth to the creolizing of theory. This synthesis is...
Article
Political emancipation in the twenty-first century must be conceived and achieved through establishing a ‘distance’ from the state and its practices. This article argues that in order to begin to understand politics ‘at a distance from the state’, we need to first understand politics as a collective thought-practice. The thought of an emancipatory...
Article
The freedom which Africa was to attain with liberation from colonialism had originally promised to emancipate all the people of the continent from poverty and oppression. Yet anyone can observe that this has not happened. Uhuru is still elusive; freedom seems unattainable. Nationalist, socialist and neo-liberal conceptions of human emancipation hav...
Article
Responding to Premesh Lalu ("Nelson Mandela Is Very Much with Us", EPW, 13 July 2013), this article calls for a reassessment of Mandela's legacy, which goes beyond the pre-liberation critique of liberal trusteeship. A reassessment of the nature of the politics of representation and their relation to popular presentation is essential in a postcoloni...
Article
This article is concerned to show that the historical science of the (neo-)colonial world is unable to allow for an analysis of the political subjectivities of 'those-who-do-not-count' or 'subalterns' as rational beings. Rather, it can only think such subjectivities as the products of people who are merely bearers of their social location, not thin...
Chapter
In order to make our period legible, it is important to also make earlier periods legible. The sequence of national liberation struggles in Africa that cohered around a particular set of political subjectivities emphasizing freedom, justice, equality, and the affirmation of a total humanity has now ended and consequently it has become more difficul...
Article
Politics, whether that of the state or that constituted beyond the state, must be analysed as thought, as subjectivity. This article proposes to do so in connection with state politics in Africa since independence. It consists of a brief theoretical justification for such a perspective, a methodological stress on the process of elucidating the name...
Article
The paper begins from the axiomatic point that, despite the form it eventually took, namely that of a neo-colonial process, development was understood and fought for in Africa as (part of) an emancipatory political project central to the liberatory vision of the pan-African nationalism which emerged victorious at independence. Indeed independence w...
Article
This report was originally written for CODESRIA, the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, and is due to be published by CODESRIA as a monograph in the near future. Interface is very grateful to Prof Neocosmos and to CODESRIA for the opportunity to present a preliminary version of this report. We hope that this enables s...
Article
Today, it is no longer clear what development names in Africa. This was not always so. During the National Liberation Struggles (NLS) in Africa and immediately after independence - during the late 1960s and early 1970s - development was the name of a national liberation project led by the state. Development was the centrepiece of the construction o...
Article
Reflecting on the causes of the recent xenophobic pogroms in South Africa, it is striking how most commentators have stressed poverty and deprivation as the underlying causes of the events. Yet it requires little effort to see that economic factors, however real, cannot possibly account for why it was those deemed to be non-South Africans who bore...
Article
A critical sociology, a sociology which is alive rather than moribund, has only existed as a result of the imagining of an emancipatory project of one form or other. At least from the rationalist project of the Enlightenment which wished to liberate thought from religious dogma, to the critique of capitalism and the imagining of an alternative in t...
Article
This paper will begin by reviewing the political assumptions of the nature of citizenship underlying T.H. Marshall’s argument for ‘social rights’; it will provide a critique of human rights discourse and civil society from an emancipatory perspective (situating these within the new forms of imperialism and statism) and will briefly comment on...
Article
Monograph Series The CODESRIA Monograph Series is published to stimulate debate, comments, and further research on the subjects covered. The Series will serve as a forum for works based on the findings of original research, which however are too long for academic journals but not long enough to be published as books, and which deserve to be accessi...
Article
The hegemonic conception of opposition politics in Africa today is still concerned with elitist notions of acquiring state power or state posts in order to provide an alternative management to that of current politicians. But oppressive and corrupt leaders succeed each other with monotonous regularity with the backing of Western interests. The popu...
Article
In the recent process of transition in Africa since the 1980s, the form of state rule has been changing in many important ways as have the relations between the state and (civil) society. One of the changes in this process concerns the demise of development as a national state project through which state rule was reproduced and legitimized (cultura...
Article
The article first considers two dominant approaches to black rural social formations in South Africa, those of neo‐classical populism and radical political economy, examining their ideology and politics as well as their theoretical inadequacies. The major part of the article then provides a general interpretation of the theory and politics of the a...
Article
This article consists of a detailed discussion of Marx's theorisation of a landed class in the capitalist mode of production. It is argued that Marx does not consider landlords as feudal leftovers but does indeed succeed in providing a sophisticated theory of capitalist landed property as an independent class, which conforms in all major respects w...
Article
This thesis is a work of theory; it is also historical. It attempts to provide a critique of the categories through which the phenomena of agricultural development and land reform are habitually grasped. It is divided into three parts. In the first part three main theoretical orientations to the study of capitalist agrarian development are discusse...
Article
The Centre for Civil Society publishes regular peer reviewed research reports in order to stimulate debate and reflection in civil society. Most of these research reports are work in progress and many are later published in books and journals. Much of the work published in these research reports has been undertaken by the Centre, with funding from...
Article
As we don't know the difference between a mosque and a university, because both are from the same root in Arabic, why do we need the state, since states pass just as surely as time? (Mahmoud Darwish) Abstract Rather than seeing the prevalence of systemic political violence in Africa as resulting from a purportedly difficult "transition to democracy...

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