Michael T Mengak

Michael T Mengak
University of Georgia | UGA · Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources

PhD

About

83
Publications
15,830
Reads
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664
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
263 Citations
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
August 2001 - present
University of Georgia
Position
  • Professor
Education
July 1982 - May 1987
Clemson University
Field of study
  • Forestry and Wildlife
July 1979 - June 1982
Clemson University
Field of study
  • Forestry and Wildlife
September 1974 - June 1979

Publications

Publications (83)
Article
Full-text available
The Allegheny woodrat Neotoma magister, a rock outcrop habitat specialist, has suffered drastic reductions in geographic range over the past 40 years. Previous research has examined habitat characteristics at varying spatial scales, but none have used occupancy modeling to examine trends over time. Therefore, we used presence/absence data from live...
Technical Report
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Article
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To manage emerging human-wildlife conflicts, wildlife managers will require more information regarding trends in wildlife damage and public perceptions of control measures. In 2017, we administered an online survey to Georgia Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) county cooperative extension agents to assess the types of inquiries or complaints a...
Article
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Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) exist as groups of metapopulations due to their dependence on naturally disjunct rocky outcrops in the eastern United States. Severe demographic declines of Allegheny woodrats have occurred in many parts of the range due to a myriad of interacting processes, therefore identifying factors that help maintain the...
Article
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Big-game hunting is a popular recreation activity on public and private land. No study in the forest economics literature has examined hunting demand by comparing price response and value across different land-ownership classes. By combining travel cost modeling with data collected from a mail survey of licensed big-game hunters, this study estimat...
Article
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Many people enjoy wildlife. It enriches their lives in many ways. Nationwide, Americans spend over $144 billion annually on fishing, hunting, and wildlife-watching activities. However, wildlife is not always welcome in or near homes, buildings, or other property and can cause significant damage or health and safety issues (Figure 1). In one study,...
Article
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Montane rock outcrops are a sensitive habitat type throughout the Appalachian Mountains. These areas provide habitat for a variety of endemic or rare fauna and flora species assemblages. Our objective was to conduct a status survey of focal mammal species considered rare in the Appalachian region, including Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister), eas...
Article
Big game hunting on private leased forestland is popular in Georgia and other parts of the southern United States. Very often, the leasing arrangement takes the form of a club, wherein a specified number of members pay an annual fee to either a landowner or the club's manager to have a certain bundle of access rights in accordance with other club r...
Article
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Hunting lease revenue can be a reliable supplemental income for forest landowners. Although studies have examined factors influencing per acre lease rates, little is known about how various characteristics are capitalized in hunting club dues. The objective of this study was to conduct a hedonic analysis of big game hunting club dues in Georgia, US...
Article
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Though abundant throughout much of its range, the ecology and local geographic distribution of Mustela frenata (Long-tailed Weasel) is not well-known, especially in the central Appalachian Mountains. In 2015, we conducted a camera study in rock outcrop habitats within Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Our objective was to determine the presence o...
Article
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A variety of problems are associated with wild pigs (Sus scrofa; e.g., crop damage, habitat destruction, transfer of infectious diseases to livestock). We contrasted stakeholder attitudes and beliefs toward wild pigs in 2 U.S. states: 1 with a long-established, widespread population of wild pigs (GA) and 1 with a recently established limited popula...
Article
We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological principle...
Poster
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The Allegheny woodrat has experienced sharp declines along the perimeter of its historic range and is now extirpated from several states along the range exterior. The goals of the study were to survey Allegheny woodrats at historic and potential sites and determine the genetic status and landscape features that influence the Allegheny woodrat in Vi...
Conference Paper
Although, there have been several studies in the US examining the financial impact of wild pigs, this presentation will present comparisons across several states of damage attributable to wild pigs. This presentation will compare financial damage across states and also examine public attitudes about wild pigs and control activities undertaken by th...
Conference Paper
Wild pigs are an invasive species across North America, causing widespread ecological damage. Wild pigs are present in the state of Illinois, USA, but populations are lower than those in most other states. These lower levels are due in part to aggressive management actions and the later arrival of pigs in the state compared to, for example, those f...
Article
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Abstract - Neotoma floridana smalli (Key Largo Woodrat) is currently at high risk of extinction from anthropogenic disturbances, including loss and degradation of habitat and non-native predators. Habitat degradation may affect food-resource availability, yet food habits are poorly understood. Therefore, we examined seasonal diets of Key Largo Wood...
Article
Full-text available
Neotoma floridana smalli (Key Largo Woodrat) is currently at high risk of extinction from anthropogenic disturbances, including loss and degradation of habitat and non-native predators. Habitat degradation may affect food-resource availability, yet food habits are poorly understood. Therefore, we examined seasonal diets of Key Largo Wood-rats using...
Article
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Declines in Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) distribution and numbers have been documented in the northern and western portions of the range for >30 years. Population trends in other parts of the range are uncertain, largely due to a lack of, or inconsistent, survey effort. We examined the efficacy of the trapping protocol currently used by man...
Article
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The Key Largo cotton mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus allapaticola) was federally listed as Endangered in 1984 due to habitat loss and subsequent population decline, but because of infrequent monitoring, the extent of decline and long-term population trends are unknown. We modeled population abundance under a variety of trapping scenarios to develop a...
Article
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Declines of imperiled small mammals are often attributed to predation without investigating the relative influence of survival and reproductive parameters on population growth. Accordingly, declines in the endangered Key Largo woodrat Neotoma floridana smalli (KLWR) population have been attributed to predation by feral cats Felis catus, Burmese pytho...
Article
Abstract: Reductions in habitat quantity and quality have contributed to precipitous declines in the Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana smalli) population over the last 30 years. Additional information on microhabitat and nest site selection is needed to increase quality of the remaining habitat and increase the population. In 2005–2006, we evalu...
Article
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ABSTRACT  The future management of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) requires solid space-use and activity data, which are currently lacking and which radiotelemetry can provide. External radiotransmitters have not been successful applied with this species. To make recommendations for intra-abdominal radiotransmitter placement in nine-b...
Article
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ABSTRACT  We examined a suite of models in an information theoretic framework to identify factors restricting presence of the endangered Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana smalli) throughout its remaining habitat. Models containing variables related to availability of nest sites and mammalian predator abundances were supported by our data. Abunda...
Article
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Knowledge of species distribution is fundamental to conservation and management efforts. Unfortunately, distribution of many mammal species in the southeastern United States, including some considered endangered, threatened, or of special concern, has been and remains poorly documented. We queried museums, reviewed the published literature, and sea...
Article
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Using ecological principles to form the basis of a succinct list of general environmental education (EE) standards will bring unity and strength to EE. Environmental education literature supports the importance of understanding general ecological principles, and general ecological concepts are prevalent in both widely used and locally adapted EE pr...
Article
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Article
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Abstract: During the last 150 years, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) have increased their range and abundance in the southeastern United States. When foraging, armadillos cause damage to agricultural crops as, as well as cause structural damage to driveways and foundations. Homeowners frequently use translocation to reduce local armad...
Article
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Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) have undergone a dramatic range expansion within the last 150 years, yet few quantitative data are available describing their habitat selection patterns, and only a single population has received the vast majority of research attention in general. Because armadillos may negatively impact native fauna, i...
Article
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I studied the natural history of the Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) in Virginia. The species is considered endangered, threatened or of special concern by Natural Heritage Programs in every state in its range. Important details of the woodrat's life history, specifically reproduction, growth rate and juvenile survival, are unclear. I trapped...
Article
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Declining Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) populations suggest a need for more basic ecological information about the species for proper management. Within the core of the Allegheny woodrat's distribution in the central Appalachians, food habits and food resource availability are poorly understood. We collected fecal material from known Alleghe...
Article
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Anthropogenic disturbance near rock outcrops occupied by Allegheny woodrats (Neotoma magister) is suspected of contributing to population declines in the northern and western peripheries of the species' distribution. We compared microhabitat characteristics among clearcut, diameter-limited and intact forest stands in the Allegheny mountains of West...
Conference Paper
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Students majoring in wildlife management at the University of Georgia have the option of enrolling in our Wildlife Damage Management course. Students participate in a variety of field activities associated with the laboratory portion of the class while also attending twice weekly lectures on wildlife damage topics. Each spring at the beginning of t...
Article
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Monitoring abundance of the endangered Key Largo woodrat (Neotoma floridana smalli) is necessary to understand population responses to prescribed management actions. We compared efficiency of adaptive cluster sampling (ACS) and stratified-random sampling (SRS) for estimating Key Largo woodrat abundance and compared three stratification designs usin...
Article
Full-text available
Neotoma magister (Allegheny Woodrat) is a medium-sized rodent associated with rock outcrops, talus slopes, caves, cliffs, and boulder fields in the central and southern Appalachians and Allegheny Plateau physiographic provinces. It is currently classified as a G3G4 species and is considered threatened, endangered, or a species of concern in almost...
Conference Paper
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: In the southeastern United States, non-industrial private forest landowners (NIPFL) have experienced reduced product market availability and increase price uncertainty. NIPFL's need additional management options for the most commonly grown southern pine species – loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). Profitability and cash flow of production forestry ente...
Chapter
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The historic range of the Allegheny woodrat Neotoma magister extended from Connecticut west to Indiana and south along the Appalachian Mountains to northeast Alabama (Wright Chapter 1). The Allegheny woodrat was initially listed as a Category II species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (Federal Register 1...
Article
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A year-long mammal survey at Vicksburg National Military Park (VICK), Vicksburg, Mississippi, was conducted during 2005. Presence was documented using photographs, sign, and voucher collections, incorporating multiple capture and monitoring techniques such as live-trapping, pitfall traps, remote cameras, mist nets, and ANABAT II detectors. A total...
Article
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The American toad is a common amphibian that can be found in the woods just as easily as a suburban backyard. They are easy to catch and a welcome addition to any garden because of their amazing appetite for garden pests. Contrary to the popular myth, toads will not give you warts if you pick them up, but their skin does contain secretions that can...
Article
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We examined a suite of macro-habitat and landscape variables around active and inactive Allegheny woodrat Neotoma magister colony sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the mid-Atlantic Highlands of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia using an information-theoretic modeling approach. Logistic regression analyses suggested that Allegheny woodrat pr...
Article
Scientists classify armadillos with anteaters and sloths which tells us immediately that they have poorly developed teeth and limited mobility. Armadillos have small, peg-like teeth that are useful for grinding their food but of little value for capturing prey. No other mammal in Georgia has bony skin plates which makes the armadillo easy to identi...
Article
Full-text available
In the past 50 years, the range of the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) in the south has been rapidly expanding. As their range expands, armadillos increasingly come into conflict with suburban landowners. When foraging, armadillos often uproot ornamental plants. Their rooting also destroys gardens, lawns, and flower beds. Their burrowi...
Article
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When deer populations become locally overabundant, browsing of ornamental and agronomic plants negatively affects plant establishment, survival, and productivity. Milorganite® is a slow-release, organic fertilizer produced from human sewage. We tested Milorganite® as a deer repellent on chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemums morifolium) in an urban/suburba...
Article
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Successful regeneration of oaks on good and medium sites has proven increasingly difficult throughout the Piedmont and Mountain regions of the mid-Atlantic. In order to control competing fire-intolerant woody vegetation and to increase the proportion of oak stems free-to-grow, a series of winter, spring and summer prescribed burns were applied to f...
Article
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In the southeastern United States, food plots are often used to compensate for annual fluctuations in forage quantity and quality. We evaluated forage production, seasonal use by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and seasonal crude protein levels of MaxQ fescue (Festuca arundinacea), Regal ladino white clover (Trifolium re-pens), and Dura...
Article
The importance of snakes such as copperheads to control rodents populations and maintain a balance among birds, salamanders frogs, fish, mammals and their habitat, is discussed. Copperheads are venomous snakes and members of the pit viper family. Pit vipers have a heat-sensing organ in a facial pit located between the eye and nostril. The organ is...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists classify armadillos with anteaters and sloths. This tells us that they have poorly developed teeth and limited mobility. In fact, armadillos have small, peg-like teeth that are useful for grinding their food but of little value for capturing prey. No other mammal in Georgia has bony skin plates or a “shell”, which makes the armadillo eas...
Chapter
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As you read through this chapter, keep in mind some general pieces of information. Gardening is an adventure but, at times, a frustrating activity. There is little we can do about drought, frost, heavy rains or other events of nature. However, we can manage the various animals that will often be attracted to our landscapes and home gardens. This ch...
Article
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I investigated the effect on small mammal populations of converting an existing fescue (Festuca arundinacea) hayfield'to switchgrass (Panicium virgatun1) on the George Washington National Forest at Hidden Valley in Bath County, Virginia. Native \\'ann season grasses are thought to provide better habitat than fescue pastures fOf Northern Bobwhite (C...
Article
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Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) regeneration or establishment impacts a large area over the southern US but few studies have examined the microhabitat relationship of small mammals on young pine stands. We collected over 1600 small mammals on natural and artificial loblolly pine regeneration areas. Twenty-five habitat variables describing cover, for...
Article
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Previous research has indicated fewer host-specific ectoparasites on woodrats of the eastern United States as compared to western woodrat species. The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) is a species of conservation concern that is associated with rocky habitats in the Appalachian and Interior Highland regions in the eastern United States. We exam...
Conference Paper
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The slash pine (Pinus elliottii)-longleaf pine (P. palustris) cover type currently occupies over 13 million acres (8.7% of total forested acres) in the southeastern United States. Despite the large acreage and numerous studies in longleaf forests, only a limited number of studies have examined wildlife utilization and management of slash pine stand...
Article
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The Allegheny woodrat (Neotoma magister) occurs in the Appalachian Mountains, forming colonies in rock outcrops, cliffs, and caves. Populations on the northern and western peripheries of the range have experienced drastic declines in the past 20-30 years. Dependence upon rock outcrops makes Allegheny woodrats vulnerable to land-use practices that a...
Article
Full-text available
Loblolly stands regenerated by the seed tree method (natural regeneration) and loblolly plantations were compared for differences in habitat and small mammal populations. Measurements were taken on 20 habitat variables that characterized the understory vegetation and gross habitat structure of each stand. Small mammals were collected by removal tra...
Article
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The relationship between feral ungulates (horses, cattle, sheep and goats) and plant communities on Shackleford Banks, North Carolina, was studied from 1978 through 1981. Aerial counts indicated that ungulate numbers during the study period ranged as follows: horses, 81 to 108, cattle, 64 to 89 and sheep, 104 to 144. Goats probably numbered from 10...
Article
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Experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of drift-fence pitfalls with three types of snap traps for sampling small mammals and to determine the usefulness of pitfalls for sampling herpetofauna. During winter 1984, small mammal capture rates were lower in pitfalls and Victor rat traps than in Victor mouse traps (P<0.01). During summer an...