Michael Marsiske

Michael Marsiske
University of Florida | UF · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

208
Publications
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Introduction
Michael Marsiske is an Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology at the University of Florida (UF). Marsiske’s major research emphases are: (a) the investigation of cognitive intervention strategies for older adults (cognitive training, video games, exercise, collaboration and prompting), and (b) development and evaluation of measures of everyday cognition. Marsiske was one of the PIs of the NIH- funded ACTIVE trial, a ten-year multi-site study of the long-term effects of cognitive interventions for older adults. Other support has come from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation “Pioneer” program (“Games for Health”) and the McKnight Brain Research Foundation. Marsiske is also the PI and training director of an National Institute

Publications

Publications (208)
Article
Objectives We assessed the relationships between pre- and post-morbid consumer credit history (credit scores, debts unpaid, or in collections) and classification of mild (or greater) cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods Generalized Estimating Equation models assessed pre-and post-morbid credit history and MCI risk among 1740 participants aged 65+ i...
Article
Objective: We examined whether social determinants of health (SDoH) are associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) risk and the effects of cognitive training over a 20-year follow-up period. Methods: Data were obtained from 1605 participants in ACTIVE. SDoH measures were created using baseline data at the individual and neighb...
Article
Objectives: The current study examines relationships between Body Mass Index (BMI) and cognitive performance and change in processing speed, memory, and reasoning, while accounting for variations by race and the influence of social determinants of health. Methods: Secondary data analysis of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital...
Article
Objectives: This article sought to determine (1) whether occupational complexity (OC) explains individual differences in cognition at baseline, (2) whether this relationship is differentially related to cognition by Black/White race, and (3) whether OC mediates some or all of the Black/White race-related variance in late life cognition. Methods: 23...
Article
Limited research exists on the association between resting-state functional network connectivity in the brain and learning and memory processes in advanced age. This study examined within-network connectivity of cingulo-opercular (CON), frontoparietal control (FPCN), and default mode (DMN) networks, and verbal and visuospatial learning and memory i...
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Introduction: Alzheimer's disease studies often lack ethnic diversity. Methods: We evaluated associations between plasma biomarkers commonly studied in Alzheimer's (p-tau181, GFAP, and NfL), clinical diagnosis (clinically normal, amnestic MCI, amnestic dementia, or non-amnestic MCI/dementia), and Aβ-PET in Hispanic and non-Hispanic older adults....
Article
Background: Early detection of mobility decline is critical to prevent subsequent reductions in quality of life, disability, and mortality. However, traditional approaches to mobility assessment are limited in their ability to capture daily fluctuations that align with sporadic health events. We aim to describe findings from a pilot study of our R...
Article
Effective non‐pharmacological interventions to remediate age‐related cognitive decline and alter trajectories toward dementia are limited. The Augmenting Cognitive Training in Older Adults trial (ACT) was the first phase III randomized clinical trial initiated for transcranial direct current stimulation. This NIA funded trial sought to evaluate whe...
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Introduction: Given prior work showing racial differences on baseline social determinants of health (SDoH) and 10-year trajectories of everyday functioning, we examined associations between SDoH and longitudinal everyday functioning performance in Black/African American and White older adults. Methods: Participants were 2505 older adults (Mage =...
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Background: Older adults are at a greater risk for contracting and experiencing severe illness from COVID-19 and may be further affected by pandemic-related precautions (e.g., social distancing and isolation in quarantine). However, the longitudinal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older adults is unclear. The current study examines changes in he...
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The prevalence of obesity is higher among Black women (56.6%) compared to Hispanic women (50%) and non‐Hispanic White women (42%). Notably, interventions to reduce obesity typically result in initial weight loss that is not maintained. This study tested (a) the effectiveness of a 6‐month Health‐Smart Weight Loss (HSWL) Program for Black women patie...
Article
Declines in processing speed performance occur in aging and are a critical marker of functional independence in older adults. Numerous studies suggest that Useful Field of View (UFOV) training may ameliorate cognitive decline in older adults. Despite its efficacy, little is known about the neural correlates of this task. The current study is the fi...
Article
Objective To assess domains of social determinants of health (SDoH) and their associations with cognition and quality of life. Method This investigation uses baseline data from individuals participating in the ACTIVE trial ( n = 2505) to reproduce the SDoH domains described in Healthy People 2030 (economic stability, health care, education, neighb...
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The literature on repetition priming in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is inconsistent, with some findings supporting spared priming while others do not. Several factors may explain these inconsistencies, including AD severity (e.g., dementia vs. Mild Cognitive Impairment; MCI) and priming paradigm-related characteristics. This systematic review and meta...
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Minimizing head motion during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is important for maintaining the integrity of neuroimaging data. While there are a variety of techniques to control for head motion, oftentimes, individuals with excessive in-scanner motion are removed from analyses. Movement in the scanner tends to increase with age; howeve...
Article
Objectives We examined associations between three geographic areas (urban, suburban, rural) and cognition (memory, reasoning, processing speed) over a 10-year period. Methods: Data were obtained from 2539 participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) trial. Multilevel, mixed-effects linear regression was...
Article
Objectives: Cognitive abilities have been implicated as predictors of mortality in older adults. This study examines the effects of cognitive training on mortality 20 years post-intervention. Methods: Data come from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) randomized control trial (N = 2802). Participants were cogn...
Article
Importance: Observational evidence suggests that higher physical activity is associated with slower kidney function decline; however, to our knowledge, no large trial has evaluated whether activity and exercise can ameliorate kidney function decline in older adults. Objective: To evaluate whether a moderate-intensity exercise intervention can af...
Article
Cognitive training has shown promise for improving cognition in older adults. Age-related neuroanatomical changes may affect cognitive training outcomes. White matter hyperintensities are one common brain change in aging reflecting decreased white matter integrity. The current study assessed (1) proximal cognitive training performance following a 3...
Article
Prior randomized control trials have shown that cognitive training interventions resulted in improved proximal task performance, improved functioning of activities of daily living, and reduced dementia risk in healthy older adults. Neural correlates implicated in cognitive training include hub brain regions of higher-order resting state networks in...
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Objective While declarative learning is dependent on the hippocampus, procedural learning and repetition priming can operate independently from the hippocampus, making them potential targets for behavioral interventions that utilize non-declarative memory systems to compensate for the declarative learning deficits associated with hippocampal insult...
Article
Clinical trials are governed by principles of good clinical practice (GCP), which can strengthen the achievement of rigor, reproducibility, and transparency in scientific research. Rigor, reproducibility, and transparency are key for producing findings with greater certainty. Clinical trials are closely supervised, often by a clinical trial coordin...
Article
Executive function is a cognitive domain that typically declines in non-pathological aging. Two cognitive control networks that are vulnerable to aging—the cingulo-opercular (CON) and fronto-parietal control (FPCN) networks—play a role in various aspects of executive functioning. However, it is unclear how communication within these networks at res...
Article
Background Rapid declines in processing speed performance occur in aging and serve as a critical marker of cognitive abilities. Studies suggest that Useful Field of View (UFOV) training may ameliorate cognitive decline. The ACTIVE trial, consisting of over 2,800 participants, found a 29% reduction in ADRD risk 10 years following intervention. Recen...
Article
Background The Useful Field of View (UFOV) test assesses divided attention/speed of processing and relates to independent activities of daily living. Cognitive training utilizing UFOV improves speed‐of‐processing and reduces dementia risk by 29%. Neural correlates of UFOV include key regions of “higher‐order” resting state networks (RSNs) involved...
Article
Declines in processing speed performance occur in aging and are a critical marker of functional independence in older adults. Studies suggest that Useful Field of View (UFOV) training may ameliorate cognitive decline. Despite its efficacy, little is known about the neural correlates of this task. Within the current study, 233 healthy older adults c...
Poster
Objective Training in a divided attention/speed-of-processing task called Useful Field of View (UFOV) reduced dementia risk in older adults. Higher connectivity in resting-state networks involved in attention/inter-network modulation (cingulo-opercular network(CON); frontoparietal control network(FPCN)) relates to better UFOV performance. Cognitive...
Poster
Objective Executive functioning is a cognitive domain that typically declines with normal aging. Age-related disrupted connectivity in cingulo-opercular (CON) and frontoparietal control (FPCN) resting-state networks is associated with worse performance across various executive functioning tasks. This study examines the relationships between CON and...
Article
Speed-of-processing abilities decline with age yet are important in performing instrumental activities of daily living. The useful field of view, or Double Decision task, assesses speed-of-processing and divided attention. Performance on this task is related to attention, executive functioning, and visual processing abilities in older adults, and p...
Article
Objective: This article examined older adults' performance on two components of a mental rotation task (reaction time and rotation rate) in a home-based intervention study of videogame (Crazy Taxi [CT]) and computerized cognitive training (PositScience InSight). Materials and Methods: Participants were randomized to one of three groups: one group...
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Frontal lobe structures decline faster than most other brain regions in older adults. Age-related change in the frontal lobe is associated with poorer executive function (e.g., working memory, switching/set-shifting, and inhibitory control). The effects and presence of frontal lobe white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on executive function in normal...
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The notion that procedural learning and memory is spared in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has important implications for interventions aiming to build on intact cognitive functions. However, despite these clinical implications, there are mixed findings in the literature about whether or not procedural learning remains intact. This meta-analysis examines...
Article
Introduction Brief (≤4 sessions) behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTi) improves insomnia symptoms in older adults. Findings for BBTi-related improvements in objective cognition are mixed, with our recent trial reporting no effects. Metacognition (appraisal of one’s own performance) has not been examined. This study examined the effects of BBTi o...
Article
Objectives: Given prevalence differences of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among Black and white older adults, this study aimed to examine whether overall vascular risk factor (VRF) burden and individual VRF associations with amnestic (aMCI) and nonamnestic (naMCI) MCI status varied by Black/white race. Methods: Participants included 2755 older ad...
Article
Age-related differences in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) structure and function have each been linked to working memory. However, few studies have integrated multimodal imaging to simultaneously investigate relationships among structure, function, and cognition. We aimed to clarify how specifically DLPFC structure and function contribute t...
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Background: Plasma NfL (pNfL) levels are elevated in many neurological disorders. However, the utility of pNfL in a clinical setting has not been established. Objective: In a cohort of diverse older participants, we examined: 1) the association of pNfL to age, sex, Hispanic ethnicity, diagnosis, and structural and amyloid imaging biomarkers; and...
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Objective: The association between hippocampal volume and memory is continuing to be characterized in healthy older adults. Prior research suggests smaller hippocampal volume in healthy older adults is associated with poorer episodic memory and processing speed, as well as working memory, verbal learning, and executive functioning as measured by th...
Article
Objective: Comprehensive neuropsychological criteria (NP criteria) for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has reduced diagnostic errors and better predicted progression to dementia than conventional MCI criteria that rely on a single impaired score and/or subjective report. This study aimed to implement an actuarial approach to classifying MCI in the...
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Introduction: Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are complex daily tasks important for independent living. Many older adults experience difficulty with IADLs as their physical and/or cognitive function begins to decline. However, it is unknown in what order IADLs become difficult. Methods: Participants from the Advanced Cognitive Train...
Article
Aging is the primary risk factor for functional decline; thus, understanding and preventing disability among older adults has emerged as an important public health challenge of the 21st century. The science of gerontology-or geroscience-has the practical purpose of "adding life to the years." The overall goal of geroscience is to increase healthspa...
Article
Study objectives: Examine independent and interactive associations between self-reported sleep [sleep efficiency and total sleep time (TST)] and pain with cognition in sedentary middle-aged and older adults. Methods: Seventy-five sedentary adults aged 50+ (Mage=63.24, SD=8.87) completed 14 daily diaries measuring sleep and pain. Weekly average s...
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Speed of processing is a cognitive domain that encompasses the speed at which an individual can perceive a given stimulus, interpret the information, and produce a correct response. Speed of processing has been shown to decline more rapidly than other cognitive domains in an aging population, suggesting that this domain is particularly vulnerable t...
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Aging is associated with disruptions in the resting-state functional architecture of the brain. Previous studies have primarily focused on age-related declines in the default mode network (DMN) and its implications in Alzheimer’s disease. However, due to mixed findings, it is unclear if changes in resting-state network functional connectivity are l...
Article
Attempts to describe the latent structure of human infant temperament have led some to suggest the existence of three major dimensions. An earlier exploratory factor analysis (EFA) supported a triadic structure of temperament in week‐old rhesus monkey infants, paralleling the structure in human infants. This study sought to confirm the latent triad...
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This study examined the baseline prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the ACTIVE study using actuarial criteria for MCI. Participants (n=2763; 26% Black) were classified as probable MCI cases if they had two observed test scores within the same cognitive domain (memory, reasoning, speed) that were >1SD below a demographically-adjusted e...
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Objectives: Our goals were to externally scale an IADL difficulty scale to the more recognizable Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ), and test whether cognitive training attenuates the relationship between IADL difficulty and mortality. Method: We leveraged externally available FAQ data from NACC to scale questions about IADL activities admin...
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In 928 ACTIVE participants, we investigated predictors of exceptional reasoning performance ten years post-enrollment. Participants had been randomized into a training arm (memory, reasoning, or speed of processing) or a no-contact control group. Each participant received an age- and education adjusted expected normative trajectory on a reasoning c...
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Objectives: The goal of the study was to examine the influence of sleep efficiency on the relationship between anxiety and executive functions. Method: Secondary data analyses of 82 community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults were performed (M age = 63.00, SD = 8.64). Anxiety was measured using the trait anxiety subscale of the State-Trait Anxi...
Article
Objective: Behavioral treatments for insomnia improve sleep in older adults, but research documenting their effects on cognitive performance is mixed. We explored whether a brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTi) impacts daily associations between sleep parameters and next day cognition. Methods: Sixty-two older adults (Mage = 69.45 years, S...
Article
Introduction Evidence links insomnia to both objective and subjective cognitive disruption in older adults. Brief (<5 sessions) behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTi) improves insomnia in older adults with insomnia (OAWI). Whether BBTi improves cognition is unclear, with our prior trial reporting no effects on objective cognition. Meta-cognition...
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Objective: This study examined the potential usability, relevance, and acceptability of V-Mart, a virtual reality grocery store as an assessment and intervention tool for veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Design: Six focus groups were conducted over a two-year period to assess perceptions from three key stakeholders: therapists,...
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The threshold for amyloid positivity by visual assessment on PET has been validated by comparison to amyloid load measured histopathologically and biochemically at post mortem. As such, it is now feasible to use qualitative visual assessment of amyloid positivity as an in-vivo gold standard to determine those factors which can modify the quantitati...
Article
Objective: Many patients require repeat neuropsychological evaluations to determine change over time. Repeat evaluations lead to practice effects, which can impact the validity of the assessment. The current study assessed, in older adults, the validity of an alternative set of verbal memory stories created by Newcomer and colleagues. Method: A tot...
Article
Objective: This study compared older adults' gains in cognitive and everyday functioning after a 60-session home-based videogame intervention with gains seen under formal cognitive training and usual care/no intervention. Materials and methods: Participants were randomized to one of three groups: one group played an off-the-shelf videogame (i.e....
Article
Objectives: Inconsistency in pain may lead to depression, which may then influence sleep. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine whether depression mediates the relationship between day-to-day inconsistency in pain and sleep in middle aged to older adults. Methods: Baseline measures from the Active Adult Mentoring Project were used for seco...
Article
Introduction: Performance tasks are presumed to have greater validity than rating scales in assessing day-to-day behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD). One such task is the revised Observed Tasks of Daily Living (OTDL-R), which has been used extensively in healthy older adults, and but not yet empirically examined in PD. Thus, the aims of the curr...
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Objective: Semantic intrusion (SI) errors may highlight specific breakdowns in memory associated with preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD); however, there have been no investigations to determine whether SI errors occur with greater frequency in persons with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) confirmed as amyloid positive (Amy+) vs those who...
Article
Health Self-Empowerment Theory asserts that 5 controllable psychological variables predict engagement in health-promoting behaviors. This study tests the theoretical integrity of Health Self-Empowerment Theory and its usefulness in predicting health-promoting behaviors and body mass index. Results from surveying 189 predominantly low-income, overwe...
Article
Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a brief behavioral intervention for insomnia (BBTi) on sleep parameters, mood, and cognitive functioning in older adults. Methods: Older adults (aged 65 years or more) underwent four weekly sessions of BBTi or self-monitoring control (SMC). Participants completed 14 days of sl...
Conference Paper
Introduction Anxiety symptoms and poor sleep are highly prevalent in older adults. The presence of anxiety and disturbed sleep independently have been associated with greater impairment in executive functioning. However, little is known regarding the interactive effects of anxiety symptoms and poor sleep on executive functioning. The current study...
Article
Objective: The purpose of this trial was to study the effects of chronic resveratrol use on cognitive function in humans. Design: The authors conducted a double-blind, Phase IIa randomized, placebo-controlled trial to obtain preliminary estimates of the effects of resveratrol supplementation on cognitive function over a 90-day period in older ad...
Article
Objectives: Analyzing medication data for research purposes is complex, and methods are rarely described in the literature. Our objective was to describe methods of quantifying opioid and nonopioid analgesics and to compare the utility of five different analgesic coding methods when analyzing relationships between pain, analgesic use, and clinical...
Article
Methods: The Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) conceptual framework was empirically tested using structural equation modeling (N=2,802). ACTIVE was guided by a conceptual framework for cognitive training in which proximal cognitive abilities (memory, inductive reasoning, speed of processing) mediate treatment-r...
Article
Background: Adults over age 65 represent the fastest growing population in the US. Decline in cognitive abilities is a hallmark of advanced age and is associated with loss of independence and dementia risk. There is a pressing need to develop effective interventions for slowing or reversing the cognitive aging process. While certain forms of cogni...
Article
Objectives: Careful characterization of how functional decline co-evolves with cognitive decline in older adults has yet to be well described. Most models of neurodegenerative disease postulate that cognitive decline predates and potentially leads to declines in everyday functional abilities; however, there is mounting evidence that subtle decline...
Article
Objectives: This study examined how different quantifications of pain (average vs. day-to-day inconsistency) are related to sleep in older adults beyond known predictors. Methods: Baseline measures from the Active Adult Mentoring Project were used for secondary analyses. Participants included 82 adults in mid to late-life. Depression was assessed w...
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Objective Cultural sensitivity training of health-care providers could help eliminate health disparities. The Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health-Care Provider Inventory (T-CSHCPI) is an inventory for providers to self-assess their engagement in patient-defined/-centered culturally sensitive health care. The T-CSHCPI is novel in that it assesses pro...
Article
Introduction Brief (≤4 sessions) behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBT-I) has been shown to improve sleep in older adults with insomnia (OAWI). Despite evidence linking insomnia to complaints of and actual impairments in attention, memory, and executive functioning, behavioral trials rarely include cognitive outcomes. The Research Examining Sleep...
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Introduction Sleep declines in late life. Negative associations between sleep and depression in older adults are well-established. Further complicating daily functioning, pain often coexists with depression and sleep disturbance. While research has shown that higher average levels of pain are associated with poorer sleep, pain can vary significantl...
Article
Introduction Night-to-night variability in sleep is a clinical feature in understanding and treating insomnia in older adults. The present study examined changes in sleep variability in the course of a brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBT-I) in older adults who had chronic insomnia. Additionally, the present study examined the mediating mec...
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Introduction Although self-efficacy has been linked to sleep outcomes in young adult samples, the relationship between sleep and self-efficacy has not yet been extensively explored in a sample of older adults. Moreover, domain-specific self-efficacy is often a better predictor of health outcomes than general self-efficacy, but the utility of differ...
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We examined two facets of control beliefs and cognition over 10 years within the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study. Intellectual Self-Efficacy decreased (β = −0.32 units/year; SE = 0.03) and Concern About Intellectual Aging increased (β = 0.26 units/year; SE = 0.02) over time, with older age being the only predicto...
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Studies have consistently shown that Asian Americans’ rate of health-service utilization and treatment adherence is very low relative to other racial/ethnic groups. Asian Americans are also more likely than their European American counterparts to experience unfairness and discrimination in health care and to express lower trust in their health-care...
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Cognitive interventions in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) seek to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in the condition. Cognitive interventions may or may not generalize beyond cognitive outcomes to everyday life. This systematic review and meta-analysis sought to assess the effect of cognitive interventions compared to a control group in MCI on general...
Article
Objective: The overall goal of our current study was to examine older adults' experience of Flow (i.e., subjective engagement) during the course of a home-based cognitive training program. Materials and methods: In this study, participants took part in a home-based training program. They were randomized to one of the two training groups. One gro...
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Background Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC) is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research...
Article
We examined the influence of neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP), racial/ethnic composition, and living in a major city on cognitive trajectories and intervention outcomes. Data came from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study (N = 2,438). Mixed effects analyses examined the associations between neighborhood v...