Michael J. Manfredo

Michael J. Manfredo
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Ph.D.

About

172
Publications
87,314
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8,514
Citations
Introduction
**Please note: I will only send copies of journal articles for which I am the lead author. I cannot send copies of book chapters. Please contact lead authors to obtain a copy of their work.

Publications

Publications (172)
Article
Full-text available
Amid a time of unprecedented social‐ecological change, professionals within and outside of the US wildlife conservation community have called for transformation of existing processes and structures to ensure that the benefits of wildlife conservation can be realized well into the future. Current momentum behind an initiative to help increase conser...
Article
Full-text available
The future viability of wildlife conservation in the United States hinges on the field's ability to adapt to changing social–ecological conditions including shifting societal values and mounting pressures to engage a greater diversity of voices in decision‐making. As wildlife agencies respond to calls to broaden their relevance amid such changes, t...
Article
Full-text available
Calls for organizational change have pervaded wildlife conservation in recent decades, driven by a shift in values that is reshaping the social landscape of wildlife management. As this process unfolds, wildlife agencies in North America seek new ways to remain relevant, focusing primarily on how they might expand support for their ongoing work. Le...
Article
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State fish and wildlife agencies in the United States are confronted with the realities of a rapidly changing society. With declines in historical sources of revenue and the growth of diverse voices with values that differ from those emphasized by traditional policies and user groups, agencies are faced with diminishing relevancy and are encounteri...
Article
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A growing body of literature has highlighted the value of social science for conservation, yet the diverse approaches of the social sciences are still inconsistently incorporated in conservation initiatives. Building greater capacity for social science integration in conservation requires frameworks and case studies that provide concrete guidance a...
Article
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Humans regularly exert a powerful influence on the survival and persistence of species, yet social‐science information is used only sporadically in conservation decisions. Using data obtained from a survey of 46,894 US residents, we developed and applied a spatially explicit “sociocultural index” to inform decision making through an understanding o...
Article
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Global biodiversity loss is indicative of the massive influence of human activity that defines the Anthropocene. Some scholars argue that changes in behaviour at the scale necessary to address this crisis will require wholesale change in cultural values. However, evidence is lacking on whether values are shifting. To better understand this phenomen...
Article
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A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-020-00675-2
Article
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We introduced a multilevel model of value shift to describe the changing social context of wildlife conservation. Our model depicts how cultural-level processes driven by modernization (e.g., increased wealth, education, and urbanization) affect changes in individual-level cognition that prompt a shift from domination to mutualism wildlife values....
Article
This study proposes that anthropomorphism is a key factor in stimulating both wildlife value shift and changing attitudes toward wildlife management in modernized countries. Evidence suggests that cultural shift due to modernization increases anthropomorphic attributions which leads to seeing wildlife as more human-like. This provides a foundation...
Article
Fisheries provide food. In industrialized nations, the overwhelming portion of seafood comes from a small number of commercial fishers and increasingly aquaculture (1). Fisheries also contribute to leisure and recreation. In developed nations, 1 in 10 people fishes for pleasure, amounting to at least 220 million recreational fishers worldwide (2, 3...
Chapter
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This chapter briefly discusses a descriptive typology of attitudes towards wildlife that was quite influential in the pioneering years of research on human dimensions of wildlife. It describes a more recent theory‐driven approach to understanding human relationships with wildlife, guided by the cognitive hierarchy. The theory of cognitive hierarchy...
Article
Article impact statement: Conservation values are unlikely to change through intentional efforts.
Article
The global rise of populism is having a profound effect on policies across many issues. We explore the potential effects on wildlife conservation using the western United States as a case study. Global populist trends have been explained through the phenomenon of cultural backlash, wherein those left behind in the value shift beginning post-World W...
Article
Large carnivores are threatened worldwide by a variety of human-driven factors, including persecution, which regularly results when they come into conflict with people. Although human activities are almost universally viewed as negatively affecting carnivore conservation, we contend that conservation outcomes for carnivores are improved when social...
Article
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The hope for creating widespread change in social values has endured among conservation professionals since early calls by Aldo Leopold for a “Land Ethic”. However, there has been little serious attention in conservation to the fields of investigation that address values, how they are formed, and how they change. We introduce a social-ecological sy...
Article
Limited funds for wildlife conservation require difficult choices about allocation of resources. One consideration is public preferences. While traditional attitudinal approaches can provide information about preferences for conservation efforts aimed at individual species, stated choice models offer a more suitable approach for exploring the compl...
Article
To improve the effectiveness of conservation solutions that depend on public support, conservationists are increasingly relying on social science that explores the factors influencing human thought and behavior. One line of research stemming from social psychology that is often applied to conservation focuses on the role of social values (core huma...
Article
Large-scale change in human values and associated behavior change is believed by some to be the ultimate solution to achieve global biodiversity conservation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of values. We contribute to this area of inquiry by examining, as a case example, the trajectory of values affecting views of wildlife in North America....
Article
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As American society diversifies, and the public interest in natural resources broadens, it is essential that wildlife agencies find ways to better understand and engage increasingly diverse audiences. Wildlife value orientations (WVO) is a concept that addresses this need by augmenting understanding of the different ways people perceive wildlife re...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Colorado State University, 1979. Includes bibliographical references (p. 93-98). Photocopy.
Chapter
Full-text available
Human-large carnivore conflict is a crucially important conservation issue. As humans are the common thread in the highly variable arena of human-wildlife conflict, and the course and resolution of conflict are determined by the thoughts and actions of the people involved, understanding the human dimension is the most crucial prerequisite for devel...
Chapter
Full-text available
The most troubling problems in conservation - deforestation, land degradation, biodiversity loss, and climate change - Are difficult to isolate and examine as independent phenomena. Increasingly, the view from science casts these as outcomes from complex interactions within and between human society and its biophysical context. Reductionist science...
Article
We used a multiple-satisfaction approach to assess demand for elk hunting opportunities in Colorado. We used a mail-out instrument and follow-up telephone interview to contact a random sample of resident and nonresident Colorado elk (Cervus elaphus) hunters (n = 1,618). The majority of elk hunters preferred rifle hunts that maximize hunting frequen...
Article
Balancing wildlife management trade-offs is likely to result in differential impacts and varying levels of support among stakeholders. Science should guide discourse regarding these trade-offs, and science can, in turn, quantify the discourse to inform management. This study developed a unique visual-based instrument to explain complex trade-offs t...
Article
Wildlife is a critical component of protected areas worldwide. It can serve not only as a primary attraction or an enjoyable part of the visitor experience but also as a source of conflict. Managing wildlife in this context requires a broadbased approach that can account for the myriad factors underlying conservation effectiveness, including the na...
Article
Beginning in 1992, regulatory changes in Colorado shortened rifle hunting for buck deer to the first three days of the combined deer and elk rifle seasons. These changes represented a severe reduction in season length (40%–75%) and provided an opportunity to examine the impact of dramatic regulatory changes on hunters’ beliefs, satisfaction, and be...
Article
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This article develops an approach for exploring the social and cultural aspects of human–wildlife conflict in a global context. The proposed micro-macro level model integrates the cognitive hierarchy theory of human behavior and materialist theory of culture. This model guides research of human behavior in these situations and yields information th...
Article
North American state wildlife agencies are increasingly faced with the challenge of effectively representing a diverse public. With increasing social conflict over wildlife issues, the future of wildlife conservation hinges on preparedness of the profession to respond to this challenge. In the interest of finding ways to improve response, 19 agenci...
Article
Objective. Studies of attitudes and values can make important contributions to emerging multi-level, interdisciplinary approaches to environmental problems. We test a multi-level model using data from a 19-state study on public thoughts toward wildlife in the western United States. Methods. Data were collected via mail survey administered to reside...
Article
Although contingent valuation (CV) often has been applied in the wildlife management field, the validity of CV remains a concern. This study explored the convergent and predictive validity of CV in a wildlife-related issue and addressed the use of CV in fee-structure decisions by examining estimates of participation and revenue associated with diff...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife conditioning and habitation to humans are frequently studied, but human conditioning and habituation to wildlife have received little attention. We propose that human–wildlife interaction can be better understood and managed if conditioning and habituation are examined in both humans and wildlife. We review what is known about human condit...
Book
Wildlife holds a special place in the human consciousness. It is a source of attraction and fear, material value and symbolic meaning, religious or spiritual significance, and it is a barometer of peoples concern for environmental sustainability. Why do humans care so much about wildlife? In Who Cares About Wildlife?, author Michael J. Manfredo exp...
Article
Full-text available
Research in the United States suggests wildlife value orientations are changing as part of a broader shift in values. Specifically, a shift from materialist to post-materialist values occurring with modernization is linked to a rise in mutualism orientations, viewing wildlife as capable of relationships of trust with humans and as deserving of righ...
Article
Full-text available
The need for cross-cultural research to better understand the relationships between humans and wildlife was one of the driving factors in the instigation of the Wildlife Values Globally project. A fundamental challenge in fulfilling this need is developing appropriate methods that can elicit thoughts about wildlife from people in a variety of cultu...
Article
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This article examines the influence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) on displacement and desertion among hunters of varying degrees of specialization. Data were obtained from surveys (n = 9,567) of resident and nonresident deer and elk hunters in eight states. Cluster analyses of hunters' skill, centrality, equipment, and experience revealed four s...
Article
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This article tests theory suggesting cognitions at the same level of specificity have stronger associations than those at different levels. Using data from a survey of Anchorage, AK, residents (n = 971, response rate = 59%), we explored relationships between general wildlife value orientations and (1) the general acceptability of hunting urban wild...
Article
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Volume 1, number 1 of Human Dimensions of Wildlife (HDW) was published in 1996. This article reviews the first 10 years of HDW using bibliometric analysis. Bibliometrics sheds light on the process of written communication by counting and analyzing publications within a discipline. The findings highlighted some encouraging trends. First, the number...
Article
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This article examines: (a) the extent to which chronic wasting disease (CWD) may influence individuals to hunt in other states or quit hunting permanently; (b) hunters' acceptance of strategies for managing the disease; and (c) whether hunters' responses differ by residency, species hunted, and state where they hunted. Data were obtained from mail...
Article
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The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which individuals process natural resource-related information in a biased manner. Data were gathered using surveys administered to students enrolled in undergraduate classes at Colorado State University. Students' attitudes toward Arctic drilling were evaluated both before and after they wer...
Article
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A goal of human dimensions research is to provide input that will improve decision making regarding wildlife management. When communicating results to managers, it is imperative that human dimensions researchers provide clear statistical information and convey the practical implications of their findings. To assist this effort, this paper describes...
Article
Assessments of the construct validity of contingent valuation (CV) rarely explore divergent validity. The unique structure of the Colorado elk and deer hunting seasons allowed the authors to assess divergent validity aspects of CV. A CV survey was designed that asked willingness to purchase an elk license only, a deer license only, both an elk and...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The primary purpose of this study was to determine wildlife value orientations among publics in the western United States and to identify factors influencing the presence of these orientations. Additional objectives were to determine public attitudes toward population-level management techniques, alternative funding and programming approaches, publ...
Article
Although contingent valuation (CV) often has been applied in the wildlife management field, the validity of CV remains a concern. This study explored the convergent and predictive validity of CV in a wildlife-related issue and addressed the use of CV in fee-structure decisions by examining estimates of participation and revenue associated with diff...
Article
Although contingent valuation (CV) often has been applied in the wildlife management field, the validity of CV remains a concern. This study explored the convergent and predictive validity of CV in a wildlife-related issue and addressed the use of CV in fee-structure decisions by examining estimates of participation and revenue associated with diff...
Article
Full-text available
The impacts of chronic wasting disease (CWD) on hunters’ behavior and beliefs about acceptable management actions are not clearly understood. This article presents findings from an initial phase of a multi-stage, multi-state effort to address these knowledge gaps. Data were obtained from mail surveys (n = 659) of resident and nonresident deer hunte...
Article
Full-text available
While there is an assumption that values toward wildlife have changed in the United States over the last half of the twentieth century, few studies have addressed this topic. This article overviews a research program designed to examine wildlife value orientation shift in the U.S. Theory and empirical research suggest that increasing affluence, edu...
Article
Full-text available
To facilitate the understanding and applicability of human dimensions findings, this article develops a formula for computing a Potential for Conflict Index (PCI) and a graphic technique for presenting the results. This approach (1) conveys information about a distribution's central tendency, dispersion, and form simultaneously; (2) uses a graphic...
Article
Human population growth and development frequently have negative impacts on natural resources and wildlife habitat. This study provided public input to county planners and wildlife managers regarding value orientations toward land use and wildlife as part of a long-range planning process to address concerns over recent growth increases in La Plata...