Michael Intal Magcamit

Michael Intal Magcamit
University of Leicester | LE · Department of Politics and International Relations

PhD Political Science

About

27
Publications
7,586
Reads
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63
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - February 2021
Queen Mary University of London
Position
  • Marie Curie Fellow
September 2016 - February 2019
Musashi University
Position
  • Assistant Professor
February 2014 - November 2014
University of Canterbury
Position
  • Tutor Intro to IR and Comparative Politics

Publications

Publications (27)
Book
Full-text available
Departing from the mainstream practice and conventional wisdom of materialist and rationalist accounts of internal and intrastate conflicts, Ethnoreligious Otherings and Passionate Conflicts demonstrates how and why emotions, symbolic predispositions, and perceptions are just as powerful and useful in understanding and explaining these phenomena. B...
Article
The ongoing shifts in the global distribution of material and normative powers, particularly between the United States and China, have significant repercussions on the foreign policy strategies of smaller, weaker actors in the international system. Due to their limited capacity for dictating international politics in ways that could guarantee their...
Article
Full-text available
In the wake of North Korea’s progressive missile testing that set even the usually stoic Japanese people into a panic mode, Japan has found itself at the mercy of its former enemies. In an ironic twist of fate, Tokyo’s security outlooks seem to have become hostage to the strategic calculations of its fiercest nemesis in the past. This paper asks wh...
Article
How does a once familiar and benign ethnoreligious community become a stranger and a threat? This article examines the underlying causal mechanisms driving rival ethnoreligious factions within pluralistic polities to frame each other as threats to their relative security, power, and status. Drawing on complementary theories from critical security,...
Article
In the contemporary Asia-Pacific context, the fault lines leading to the Thucydides trap can be attributed to the continuing strategic competition between a seemingly declining United States and a rising China. Failure to circumvent this trap can ultimately result in a war of all against all. Against this backdrop, this article investigates how a s...
Article
In his much-acclaimed historical account of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides concluded that it was the rise of Athens and the fear that this event inspired in Sparta that made war inevitable. The probability of conflict ensuing between the emerging and established powers has been referred to by war scholars as the ‘Thucydides’ trap’. In the contem...
Article
In the age of growing global populism, the continued popularity and relevance of a populist government is anchored on the ability of its populist leader to convince the voters that the primary objective of his foreign policies is to secure the interests of the state and its citizens. However, without an adequate level of state power, pursuing reali...
Chapter
Full-text available
Understanding the motives and rationales behind the small powers’ attempts at linking security and trade requires a detailed understanding of the important events that have precipitated the need for such as a strategy. The shifting political, economic and strategic conditions provide important clues about why and how weaker states use trade to solv...
Chapter
The linkage efforts, strategies and outcomes of Taiwan, Singapore, the Philippines and Malaysia reveal significant insights about the innovative approaches being adopted by small powers to solve their security concerns and the trade-offs they make to do so. Given the enormous strategic constraints that they face, the small powers in general have he...
Chapter
Singapore’s rude awakening to independence after its sudden expulsion from the former Malaysian Federation in 1965 led to its transformation as one of the most strategic entrepôts in the world. The country’s limited territorial lands and scarce natural resources, combined with huge per capita income, high population density and complex ethnic mix,...
Chapter
The geopolitical complexities surrounding the cross-Strait relations prevent Taiwanese leaders from pursuing the goal of de jure sovereignty for the country. This results in the continued non-recognition of Taiwan as a legitimate state in the international community, particularly among the United Nations members. Consequently, Taiwan is forced to r...
Chapter
The strategic behaviour of small powers in the international system can be described in one word: dependence. While a single, universally accepted definition of the term ‘small power’ remains debatable, nonetheless, the extant literature reveals recurring features of their behavioural approaches to world politics.1 First, small powers clearly recog...
Chapter
The country’s march toward a multi-ethnic nation building has been severely undermined by enduring structural divisions, which for the longest time have separated the Bumiputeras (i.e. native Muslim Malays) from the non-Bumiputeras (i.e. Chinese, Indians and non-Malay indigenous groups). The aggressive promotion of the Bumiputera identity as the ba...
Chapter
The highly imbalanced development of the Philippine economy has become an enduring threat to the country’s supposedly people-centric national security. Although the Philippines had earlier on served as a model economy for many of its neighbours, particularly during the post-war period between 1950s and 1960s, however, things went downhill beginning...
Book
This book examines why and how small powers link their security interests and trade agendas, and how security threats influence the facilitation and outcome of their trade activities. In doing so, it analyses the increasingly complex connections between trade and security, demonstrating how these linkages affect the overall security of four small b...
Article
Our assumptions about the nature and conduct of contemporary international politics deeply impact how we view maritime disputes plaguing the East and South China Seas. In this article, our analysis of the push and pull factors that influence the extent and possible resolution of maritime disputes in East Asia reveals that war is neither opposed in...
Article
This paper examines the manner through which the Philippine government has utilized free trade in pursuing its development-oriented national security policies and strategies in the twenty-first century. It argues that against the backdrop of uneven economic development being perpetuated by a deeply entrenched oligarchic system and patronage culture...
Article
Singapore's rude awakening to independence has led to the creation of one of the most important and strategic entrepôts in the Asia-Pacific. The country's limited territorial lands and natural resources, combined with huge per capita income, high population density and sensitive racial mix, make Singapore the quintessential pragmatic trading state...
Article
(Forthcoming) This article examines Taiwan’s cross-strait relations with China by analysing the linkages between their respective security interests and free trade objectives in the twenty-first century. It argues that these entanglements induce a scenario akin to the prisoner’s dilemma that compels Taiwanese leaders and policymakers to preserve th...
Article
The Barisan Nasional's construction and implementation of ideational and material security apparatuses has created a one-sided internal security dilemma in Malaysia. This paper argues that the noble objective of promoting Malay interests has been transformed to the venal objective of securing Barisan's political perpetuity that is being pursued und...
Article
This paper seeks to explore and explain the process through which Taiwan utilizes free trade – both at multilateral and bilateral levels – in enhancing its shrinking de facto sovereignty against the backdrop of ubiquitous ‘China factor’ in the twenty-first century. It argues that China's sinicization project creates a scenario wherein increasing cr...
Article
This article attempts to explore and analyse the evidence for cohabiting the human security concept into the national security frameworks of ASEAN countries. Using the Philippines and Malaysia as case studies, the article determines the extent to which public officials and policymakers have redefined and reenvisioned national security by incorporat...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The rise of religiously inspired extremism and violence over the past 16 years has underscored the crucial and abiding link between religion and security. While much emphasis has been placed on Islam and the Middle East, the research proposed here pioneers the study of religion and security in Southeast Asia, comparing the predominantly Catholic Philippines, Islamic Indonesia, and Buddhist Myanmar. Using a qualitative, comparative approach, I theorize and produce new empirical knowledge about: (a) why and how states utilize different types of religions in formulating and implementing their national security policies and strategies; and (b) how traditional/non-traditional security issues influence the utility and status of religions, particularly the (often negative) impact on religious minorities.