Michael G Just

Michael G Just
Engineer Research and Development Center - U.S. Army | ERDC US Army · Construction Engineering Research Laboratory

Doctor of Philosophy - Plant Biology

About

32
Publications
5,402
Reads
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353
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
331 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Additional affiliations
May 2020 - present
Engineer Research and Development Center - U.S. Army
Position
  • Research Ecologist
May 2019 - May 2020
North Carolina State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2016 - May 2019
North Carolina State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Positive feedbacks influenced by direct and indirect interactions between fire, vegetation, and microclimate can allow pyrophilic and pyrophobic ecosystems to co-occur in the same landscape, resulting in the juxtaposition of flammable and non-flammable vegetation. To quantify the drivers of these feedbacks, we combined measurements of vegetation, f...
Article
Urban landscapes are characterized by high proportions of impervious surface resulting in higher temperatures than adjacent natural landscapes. In some cities, like those at cooler latitudes, trees may benefit from warmer urban temperatures, but trees in many cities are beset with problems like drought stress and increased herbivory. What drives pa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distributions and abundances, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high-quality, empirical data that spans large spatial scales and long time periods. The National...
Article
Prior to European settlement the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem covered over 92 million hectares in the southeastern United States. Historically, fire was an important driver of species composition in the longleaf pine ecosystem, but fire exclusion since the early 20th century has led to the degradation of longleaf pine communities and h...
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns and drivers of species distribution and abundance, and thus biodiversity, is a core goal of ecology. Despite advances in recent decades, research into these patterns and processes is currently limited by a lack of standardized, high‐quality, empirical data that span large spatial scales and long time periods. The NEON fills t...
Article
Urbanization transforms environments in ways that alter biological evolution. We examined whether urban environmental change drives parallel evolution by sampling 110,019 white clover plants from 6169 populations in 160 cities globally. Plants were assayed for a Mendelian antiherbivore defense that also affects tolerance to abiotic stressors. Urban...
Article
Full-text available
It is a critical time to reflect on the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) science to date as well as envision what research can be done right now with NEON (and other) data and what training is needed to enable a diverse user community. NEON became fully operational in May 2019 and has pivoted from planning and construction to operatio...
Article
Full-text available
Sleeper species are innocuous native or naturalized species that exhibit invasive characteristics and become pests in response to environmental change. Climate warming is expected to increase arthropod damage in forests, in part, by transforming innocuous herbivores into severe pests: awakening sleeper species. Urban areas are warmer than natural a...
Article
An insect species' geographic distribution is probably delimited in part by physiological tolerances of environmental temperatures. Gloomy scale (Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock)) is a native insect herbivore in eastern U.S. forests. In eastern U.S. cities, where temperatures are warmer than nearby natural areas, M. tenebricosa is a primary pest o...
Article
Full-text available
Gloomy scale, Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock), is native to the eastern United States and feeds on deciduous trees. In natural areas, it is a background herbivore that typically remains at low densities. Gloomy scale generally responds positively to warming with greater egg production, size, survival, and abundance. In urban areas, which are warm...
Article
Fire controls tree cover in many savannas by suppressing saplings through repeated topkill and resprouting, causing a demographic bottleneck. Tree cover can increase dramatically if even a small fraction of saplings escape this fire trap, so modelling and management of savanna vegetation should account for occasional individuals that escape the fir...
Article
Tree-stem growth is an important metric for evaluating many ecological and silvicultural research questions. However, answering these questions may require monitoring growth on many individual trees that span changing environments and geographies, which can incur significant costs. Recently, citizen science has been successfully employed as a cost-...
Article
Full-text available
Human engineering of the outdoors led to the development of the indoor niche, including home construction. However, it is unlikely that domicile construction mechanics are under direct selection for humans. Nonetheless, our preferences within indoor environments are, or once were, consequential to our fitness. The research of human homes does not u...
Article
Full-text available
The power of citizen science to contribute to both science and society is gaining increased recognition, particularly in physics and biology. Although there is a long history of public engagement in agriculture and food science, the term 'citizen science' has rarely been applied to these efforts. Similarly, in the emerging field of citizen science,...
Article
Impervious surfaces are a ubiquitous urban feature that increase temperature and tree drought stress and are a demonstrated indicator of Acer rubrum L. tree condition and insect pest abundance. We examined the relationship between A. rubrum condition, impervious surface cover, and Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock) abundance, a primary herbivore of...
Article
A foundation of integrated pest management (IPM) in urban landscapes is to put the right plant in the right place. This preventive tactic can reduce plant stress, pest infestations, and subsequent pesticide applications. Many urban tree species have more insect and mite pests in urban landscapes than in surrounding natural areas. This is due in par...
Article
Fire-promoting, open-canopy ecosystems are under threat of conversion to a fire-deterring, closed-canopy condition due to woody encroachment. This conversion of vegetation structure has been fostered by introduced woody plant species. We performed a field experiment to quantify growth, survival, and establishment success of six invasive, woody spec...
Article
Full-text available
Key message: Along a fire frequency gradient, we found a savanna tree species had the greatest below ground decay compartmentalization after coppicing as compared to other resprouting species located at mesic gradient positions. Abstract: In pyrophilic ecosystems, woody plants are repeatedly injured or topkilled (i.e. aboveground tissue is killed...
Article
Full-text available
Since the work of Alfred Russel Wallace, biologists have sought to divide the world into biogeographic regions that reflect the history of continents and evolution. These divisions not only guide conservation efforts, but are also the fundamental reference point for understanding the distribution of life. However, the biogeography of human-associat...
Article
Full-text available
In frequently burned ecosystems, many plants persist by repeated resprouting from basal or belowground buds. This strategy requires that plants reach a balance between biomass loss and recovery, which depends on the shape of the relationship between pre- and post-fire size. Previous analyses of this relationship, however, have focused on the size o...
Conference Paper
Positive feedbacks influenced by direct and indirect interactions between fire, vegetation, and microclimate can allow pyrophilic and pyrophobic ecosystems to co-occur in the same landscape, resulting in the juxtaposition of flammable and non-flammable vegetation. To quantify the drivers of these feedbacks, we combined measurements of vegetation, f...
Article
Prioritizing management of invasive plants is important for large land management entities, such as federal and state public land stewards, because management resources are limited and multiple land uses and management objectives are differentially impacted. Management decisions also have important consequences for the likelihood of success and ult...
Article
Plant species distributions and transitions between vegetation types are determined by numerous factors, including disturbances such as fire. Documentation of past changes in the distribution and structure of fire-dependent ecosystems is necessary to assess the success of land management in maintaining historic vegetation types. In our study system...
Article
Full-text available
The aphid Aphis glycines Matsumura, which was first observed in North America in 2000, is a pest of soybean, Glycine max L., in the United States and southern Canada. This study focused on the distribution and sampling of this aphid at two spatial scales: field and township. We sampled 14 soybean fields in each of two townships in Kendall and Champ...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The objectives of the project are to understand how climate and urbanization affect tree growth and health, and thus ecological services like carbon sequestration and air and water filtration. http://ecoipm.org/a-trees-life/