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Michael A Hudson

Michael A Hudson
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust / Institute of Zoology, ZSL · Conservation Science / Institute of Zoology

PhD, MSc , BSc

About

21
Publications
11,616
Reads
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229
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - present
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
Position
  • Manager
January 2018 - present
Zoological Society of London
Position
  • Fellow
June 2016 - March 2020
Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Evidence-based approaches are key for underpinning effective conservation practice, but major gaps in the evidence of the effectiveness of interventions limit their use. Conservation practitioners could make major contributions to filling these gaps but often lack the time, funding, or capacity to do so properly. Many funders target the delivery of...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the imperative to evaluate species recovery and conservation impact, in 2012 the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) called for development of a "Green List of Species" (now the IUCN Green Status of Species). A draft Green Status framework for assessing species' progress toward recovery, published in 2018, proposed 2 s...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: To explore global patterns in spatial aggregations of species richness, vulnerability and data deficiency for Rodentia and Eulipotyphla. To evaluate the adequacy of existing protected area (PA) network for these areas. To provide a focus for local conservation initiatives. Location: Global. Methods: Total species, globally threatened (GT) spec...
Article
Full-text available
The mountain chicken frog (Leptodactylus fallax) is a critically endangered frog native to the Caribbean islands of Dominica and Montserrat. Over the past 25 years their populations have declined by over 85%, largely due to a chytridiomycosis outbreak that nearly wiped out the Montserratian population. Within the context of developing tools that ca...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative assessment of the relative information content of different independent spatial data types is necessary to evaluate whether they provide congruent biogeographic signals for predicting species ranges. Opportunistic occurrence records and systematically collected survey data are available from the Dominican Republic for Hispaniola’s survi...
Conference Paper
The Critically Endangered mountain chicken (Leptodactylus fallax), found on the Caribbean islands of Dominica and Montserrat, underwent one of the fastest declines observed in any vertebrate species due to the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. A remnant population of c.130 individuals survives on Dominica but the Montserrat population...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term baselines on biodiversity change through time are crucial to inform conservation decision-making in biodiversity hotspots, but environmental archives remain unavailable for many regions. Extensive palaeontological, zooarchaeological and historical records and indigenous knowledge about past environmental conditions exist for China, a mega...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging infectious diseases are an increasingly important threat to wildlife conservation, with amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the disease most commonly associated with species declines and extinctions. However, some amphibians can be infected with B. dendrobatidis in the absence of disease and can act as res...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging infectious diseases are an increasingly important threat to wildlife conservation, with amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the disease most commonly associated with species declines and extinctions. However, some amphibians can be infected with B. dendrobatidis in the absence of disease and can act as res...
Article
Full-text available
A bat on the brink? A range-wide survey of the Critically Endangered Livingstone's fruit bat Pteropus livingstonii—CORRIGENDUM - Volume 51 Issue 4 - Bronwen M. Daniel, Kathleen E. Green, Hugh Doulton, Daniel Mohamed Salim, Ishaka Said, Michael Hudson, Jeff S. Dawson, Richard P. Young, Amelaid Houmadi
Article
Full-text available
Scientific Reports 6 : Article number: 30772; 10.1038/srep30772 published online: 03 August 2016 updated: 11 January 2017 . In this Article, R. A. Griffiths is incorrectly listed as being affiliated with ‘Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, Les Augres Manor, Trinity, Jersey, Channel Islands, UK’ The correct affiliation is listed below: Durrell Ins...
Article
The Livingstone's fruit bat Pteropus livingstonii is endemic to the small islands of Anjouan and Mohéli in the Comoros archipelago, Indian Ocean. The species is under threat from anthropogenic pressure on the little that remains of its forest habitat, now restricted to the islands’ upper elevations and steepest slopes. We report the results of the...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibian chytridiomycosis has caused precipitous declines in hundreds of species worldwide. By tracking mountain chicken (Leptodactylus fallax) populations before, during and after the emergence of chytridiomycosis, we quantified the real-time species level impacts of this disease. We report a range-wide species decline amongst the fastest ever re...
Article
Full-text available
Waterbirds are a globally-distributed, species-rich group of birds that are critically dependent upon wetland habitats. They can be used as ecosystem sentinels for wetlands, which as well as providing ecosystem services and functions essential to humans, are important habitats for a wide range of plant and animal taxa. Here we carry out the first g...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
With Vojtech Baláž from University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, and Mike Hudson from Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and Institute of Zoology, ZSL. We are looking at the development of field based disease detection methods using LAMP. Currently our main focus is the amphibian chytrid fungus. So far we've received a small reward from Conservation X Labs but are eager to continue this work and explore other pathogens beyond chytrid. If you are interested, please message and view our videos: https://youtu.be/fIYFlPO-LPE https://youtu.be/IVykGoB6vnk https://youtu.be/LYxd4DLBMFw
Project
Mountain Chicken Recovery Programme