Michael Hornberger

Michael Hornberger
University of East Anglia | UEA · Norwich Medical School

About

296
Publications
72,063
Reads
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9,551
Citations
Citations since 2016
149 Research Items
6770 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - present
NeurOn - Neuropsychology Online
Position
  • Director
Description
  • A modern approach to cognitive testing NeurOn has been designed from the ground up for remote, digitised, testing and easy access to your raw data.
April 2016 - present
Mantal
Position
  • Non-executive
Description
  • Remote research management portal Manage, recruit and automate multiple research studies from a single online portal. Packed with features and cognitive tests.

Publications

Publications (296)
Article
Full-text available
We sought to systematically review and meta-analy the role of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) using arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) and compare this in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and cognitively normal adults (CN). The prevalence o...
Article
Full-text available
Background Advances in medicine and public health mean that people are living longer; however, a significant proportion of that increased lifespan is spent in a prolonged state of declining health and wellbeing which places increasing pressure on medical, health and social services. There is a social and economic need to develop strategies to preve...
Article
Objectives : To compare the magnitude of cognitive impairment against age-expected levels across the immune mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs: systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], rheumatoid arthritis [RA], axial spondyloarthritis [axSpA], psoriatic arthritis [PsA], psoriasis [PsO]). Methods : A pre-defined search strategy was implemented in Me...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cognitive abilities can vary widely. Some people excel in certain skills, others struggle. However, not all those who describe themselves as gifted are. One possible influence on self-estimates is the surrounding culture. Some cultures may amplify self-assurance and others cultivate humility. Past research has shown that people in different countri...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial navigation impairments in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been suggested to underlie patients experiencing spatial disorientation. Though many studies have highlighted navigation impairments for AD patients in virtual reality (VR) environments, the extent to which these impairments predict a patient’s risk for spatial disorientation in the re...
Article
Mentalizing and emotion recognition are impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). It is not clear whether these abilities are also disturbed in other conditions with prominent frontal lobe involvement, such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Our aim was to investigate social cognition (facial emotion recognition, recogni...
Article
Full-text available
Measures of social cognition have now become central in neuropsychology, being essential for early and differential diagnoses, follow-up, and rehabilitation in a wide range of conditions. With the scientific world becoming increasingly interconnected, international neuropsychological and medical collaborations are burgeoning to tackle the global ch...
Preprint
Background:The risk of dementia is higher in women than men. The metabolic consequences of estrogen decline during menopause accelerates neuropathology in women. The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the prevention of cognitive decline has shown conflicting results. Here we investigate the modulating role of APOE genotype and age at HRT i...
Article
Full-text available
Where we grow up can define us in many ways: how we speak, what activities we do, and who we might spend our life with. We have recently found that it can also impact the ability to navigate.1 Growing up in a city has, on average, a negative impact on navigation skill. This insight may be important for the development of new tools to aid the diagno...
Article
Full-text available
Measures of social cognition have now become central in neuropsychology, being essential for early and differential diagnoses, follow-up and rehabilitation in a wide range of conditions. With the scientific world becoming increasingly interconnected, international neuropsychological and medical collaborations are burgeoning to tackle the global cha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Path integration changes may precede a clinical presentation of Alzheimer disease by several years. Studies to date have focused on how grid cell changes affect path integration in preclinical AD. However, vestibular input is also critical for intact path integration. Here, we developed a naturalistic vestibular task that requires individuals to ma...
Article
Full-text available
Background Ageing is highly associated with cognitive decline and modifiable risk factors such as diet are believed to protect against this process. Specific dietary components and in particular, (poly)phenol-rich fruits such as berries have been increasingly recognised for their protection against age-related neurodegeneration. However, the impact...
Article
Background: Spatial disorientation is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and can lead to them getting lost in the community. Although it is a prevalent problem worldwide and is associated with various negative consequences, very little is known about the extent to which outdoor navigation...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To explore carers’ views and acceptability of internet-delivered, therapist-guided, self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for family carers of people with dementia (iACT4CARERS). Methods: A qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews was employed with family carers (N=23) taking part in a feasibility study of iACT4CARE...
Article
Full-text available
The cultural and geographical properties of the environment have been shown to deeply influence cognition and mental health1–6. Living near green spaces has been found to be strongly beneficial7–11, and urban residence has been associated with a higher risk of some psychiatric disorders12–14—although some studies suggest that dense socioeconomic ne...
Article
Full-text available
Impairment of navigation is one of the earliest symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but to date studies have involved proxy tests of navigation rather than studies of real life behaviour. Here we use GPS tracking to measure ecological outdoor behaviour in AD. The aim was to use data-driven machine learning approaches to explore spatial metrics wi...
Article
Recent evidence has implicated areas within the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) as among the first to show pathophysiological changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Focal brain damage to the PPC can cause optic ataxia, a specific deficit in reaching to peripheral targets. The present study describes a novel investigation of peripheral reaching abilit...
Article
This study aimed to explore therapists’ perceptions and acceptability of providing internet-delivered, therapist-guided, self-help acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for family carers of people with dementia (iACT4CARERS). To achieve this, a qualitative approach with semi-structured interviews was employed with eight novice therapists recruite...
Article
Full-text available
Navigation ability varies widely across humans. Prior studies have reported that being younger and a male has an advantage for navigation ability. However, these studies have generally involved small numbers of participants from a handful of western countries. Here, we review findings from our project Sea Hero Quest, which used a video game for mob...
Article
Background: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain and accounts for 30% to 40% of fatty acids in the grey matter of the human cortex. Although the influence of circulating DHA levels on memory function is widely researched, its association with brain volumes is under investigated and its...
Article
The hippocampus is regarded as the pivotal structure for episodic memory symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathophysiology. However, what is often overlooked is that the hippocampus is ‘only’ one part of a network of memory critical regions, the Papez circuit. Other Papez circuit regions are often regarded as less relevant for AD as...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The feasibility of research into internet-delivered guided self-help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for family carers of people with dementia is not known. This study assessed this in an uncontrolled feasibility study. Method: Family carers of people with dementia with mild to moderate anxiety or depression were recruited fr...
Article
Full-text available
Detection of incipient cognitive impairment and dementia pathophysiology is critical to identify preclinical populations and target potentially disease modifying interventions towards them. There are currently concerted efforts for such detection for Alzheimer's disease (AD). By contrast, the examination of cognitive markers and their relationship...
Conference Paper
Background: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain and accounts for 30% to 40% of fatty acids in the grey matter of the human cortex. Although the influence of circulating DHA levels on memory function is widely researched, its association with brain volumes is under investigated and its a...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, characterized by symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, and tremor. Recently, there has been a growing focus on the relationship between the gut and the development of PD. Emerging to the forefront, an interesting concept has developed suggest...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives To compare the cognitive ability of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with healthy controls (HCs). Methods People with RA were recruited from the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR), a population-based cohort study of people with inflammatory arthritis. Data on aged-matched HCs (people with no cognitive impairment) came from the compa...
Article
Full-text available
Docosahexaenoic acid is the main long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the brain and accounts for 30-40% of fatty acids in the grey matter of the human cortex. Although the influence of docosahexaenoic acid on memory function is widely researched, its association with brain volumes is under investigated and its association with spatial...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that tests of memory fidelity, feature binding and spatial navigation are promising for early detection of subtle behavioural changes related to Alzheimer’s disease. In the absence of longitudinal data, one way of testing the early detection potential of cognitive tasks is through the comparison of individuals at different genetic...
Article
Full-text available
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia are two different diseases recognized to overlap at clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics. Both conditions are traditionally known for relative sparing of episodic memory. However, recent studies have disputed that with the report of patients presenting with...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction L’influence des facteurs culturels sur les capacités à interagir efficacement avec nos pairs reste mal comprise. Cette question est centrale car la plupart des tests sont développés dans des contextes très spécifiques non représentatifs de la population mondiale. Objectifs À travers une étude internationale, nous souhaitions tester l’...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Spatial disorientation is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and can lead to them getting lost in the community. Although it is a prevalent problem worldwide and is associated with various negative consequences, very little is known about the extent to which outdoor navigation p...
Article
Background: Differentiating patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is important as these two conditions have distinct treatment and prognosis. Using episodic impairment and medial temporal lobe atrophy as a tool to make this distinction has been debatable in the recent literature, as some pat...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Dementia prevalence continues to increase, and effective interventions are needed to prevent, delay or slow its progression. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and increased physical activity (PA) have been proposed as strategies to facilitate healthy brain ageing and reduce dementia risk. However, to date, there have...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spatial trajectories are ubiquitous and complex signals. Their analysis is crucial in many research fields, from urban planning to neuroscience. Several approaches have been proposed to cluster trajectories. They rely on hand-crafted features, which struggle to capture the spatio-temporal complexity of the signal, or on Artificial Neural Networks (...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research suggests that tests of memory fidelity, feature binding and spatial navigation are promising for early detection of subtle behavioural changes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the absence of longitudinal data, one way of testing the early detection potential of cognitive tasks is through the comparison of individuals at different ge...
Article
Path integration spatial navigation processes are emerging as promising cognitive biomarkers for prodromal and clinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, such path integration changes have been little explored in Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI),despite neurovascular change being a major contributing factor to dementia and potentially AD. In pa...
Article
Getting lost is one of the earliest and most distressing symptoms seen in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Despite being a prevalent problem in the community worldwide, very few studies have explored real‐world environmental factors that may potentially contribute to patients getting lost. In this study, we aim to investigate whether road network structur...
Article
Cognitive decline is a common complaint in menopause. Alzheimer disease(AD) has higher incidence in women and early menopause increases risk for AD. Studies of cognitive change at menopause have had mixed results. Navigational ability declines early in the course of AD. No studies have looked at changes in navigational ability around menopause. Obj...
Article
Decades of researches aiming to unveil truths about human neuropsychology may have instead unveil facts appropriate to only a fraction of the world’s population: those living in western educated rich democratic nations (Muthukrishna et al., 2020 Psych Sci). So far, most studies were conducted as if education and cultural assumptions on which neurop...
Article
Full-text available
Dementia-related missing incidents are a highly prevalent issue worldwide. Despite being associated with potentially life-threatening consequences, very little is still known about what environmental risk factors may potentially contribute to these missing incidents. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective, observational analysis using...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to understand whether or not computer models of saliency could explain landmark saliency. An online survey was conducted and participants were asked to watch videos from a spatial navigation video game (Sea Hero Quest). Participants were asked to pay attention to the environments within which the boat was moving and to rate the per...
Poster
Full-text available
Volume 29, Issue S1 Special Issue: Abstracts of the 25th Congress of the European Sleep Research Society, 22‐24 September 2020, Virtual Congress September 2020
Article
Full-text available
The Virtual Supermarket Task (VST) and Sea Hero Quest detect high-genetic-risk Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We aimed to determine their test-retest reliability in a preclinical AD population. Over two time points, separated by an 18-month period, 59 cognitively healthy individuals underwent a neuropsychological and spatial navigation assessment. At ba...
Article
Full-text available
In July 2019, a group of multidisciplinary dementia researchers from Brazil and the United Kingdom (UK) met in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, to discuss and propose solutions to current challenges faced in the diagnosis, public perception, and care of dementia. Here we summarize the outcomes from the workshop addressing challenge...
Chapter
The aim of this study is to understand what makes a landmark more salient and to explore whether assessments of saliency vary between experts and non-experts. We hypothesize that non-experts’ saliency judgments will agree with those of the experts. Secondly, we hypothesize that not only visual characteristics but also structural characteristics mak...
Chapter
Landmarks are key elements in the wayfinding process. The impact of global and local landmarks in wayfinding has been explored by many researchers and a large body of evidence around landmarks and landmark usage has been discussed [1, 2]. However, there is one aspect of landmark research that is still not clear: when can a landmark be termed “globa...
Chapter
One of the most common definitions of saliency suggests that there are three categories for landmark saliency, these being visual, structural and cognitive [1]. A large number of studies have focused on the afore-mentioned categories; however, there appear to be fewer studies on cognitive saliency than on the other two types of landmark saliency. H...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans have developed specific abilities to interact efficiently with their conspecifics (social cognition). Despite abundant behavioral and neuroscientific research, the influence of cultural factors on these skills remains poorly understood. This issue is of particular importance as most cognitive tasks are developed in highly specific contexts,...
Article
Full-text available
Path integration spatial navigation processes are emerging as promising cognitive markers for prodromal and clinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, such path integration changes have been less explored in Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI), despite neurovascular change being a major contributing factor to dementia and potentially AD. In partic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Spatial trajectories are ubiquitous and complex signals. Their analysis is crucial in many research fields, from urban planning to neuroscience. Several approaches have been proposed to cluster trajectories. They rely on hand-crafted features, which struggle to capture the spatio-temporal complexity of the signal, or on Artificial Neural Networks (...
Preprint
Full-text available
Path integration spatial navigation processes are emerging as promising cognitive markers for prodromal and clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, such path integration changes have been little explored in Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI), despite neurovascular change being a major contributing factor to dementia and potentially AD. In part...
Article
Full-text available
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common neurodegenerative early-onset dementias. Despite the fact that both conditions have a very distinctive clinical pattern, they present with an overlap in their cognitive and behavioral features that may lead to misdiagnosis or delay in diagnosis. The current review intend...