Michael Devalve

Michael Devalve
Bridgewater State University · Department of Criminal Justice

Ph.D.

About

33
Publications
11,951
Reads
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116
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
90 Citations
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Introduction
Michael DeValve has joined the Department of Criminal Justice at Bridgewater State University. Michael is a theorist primarily, focusing on the relationship between justice and love, and on police-community conflict resolution.

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
This essay argues for a more formal relationship between policing and mindful practice as taught by the Zen monk Thich Nhat Hanh. The paper explores the value of Nhat Hanh’s teachings for improving the daily implementation of police services by individual officers, and the transformation of the suffering witnessed and experienced by those officers....
Article
Full-text available
Authentic rebellion is not a thing one can see, hear, touch, feel, or taste, or co-opt. It exists beyond our senses because it blossoms verdant in the most fertile soil of each human heart. More particularly, it is a sacrament, an outward sign of our most reverend and fragrant wisdom. Tracing the thought of Camus, and referencing my own recent scho...
Book
The criminal justice system in America does not work, and, from the perspective of current criminological thought, no ideas exist for how to truly fix it. The fault lies not with criminology as a discourse, but with us as individuals. We must, together, address three fundamental questions regarding our capacity and willingness to make a justice sys...
Book
Despite great effort and some improvements, criminal justice today still seems like an oxymoron. There are some very good reasons for this feeling: catastrophic failures abound and marginal improvements appear revolutionary. This book addresses the idea of justice in order to guide society toward a more effective justice system. Specifically, the a...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this essay is the creation of a theory of suffering and healing. This “ontological” theory is intended to serve as a foundation for the development of justice-related responses to harm (i.e., crime and victimization, inter alia) as part of the author’s broader writing on justice as love. Drawing on Buddhist and Christian theological...
Article
Full-text available
Witnessing current events in Ferguson, and now in Milwaukee, New York, Los Angeles, Seattle, of course Portland, and now Kenosha, Wisconsin, where protests against police violence are met with yet more police violence, the question naturally arises: Why are police so seemingly insistent on actively working counter to their own organizational best i...
Book
Personal Ethics and Ordinary Heroes: The Social Context of Morality examines what it means to be an authentic hero and provides real-life narratives that underscore the ethical principles guiding decision-making in the justice system and beyond. This engaging work revolves around a collection of excerpts from students studying ethics and social ju...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research on public attitudes towards the police has tended to use three concepts—satisfaction with the police, confidence in the police, and trust in the police—entirely interchangeably. Recently, there has been a call for differentiating these three concepts. The current study seeks to address this research gap by analyzing a unique Canadian...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies on the reporting of crimes to the police have focused on adult victims. Less is known, however, regarding crime reporting behavior among school-age victims. This paper presents findings from an exploratory study of violent crime reporting decision-making among school-age victims. It used six waves of data from NCVS SCS and thus seeks a...
Article
Full-text available
We have been misled it would seem. We have been encouraged to seek justice in big things; big acts, big places, big power; justice we are told is gargantuan, lumbering, total, sometimes brutal, but always big and always from above. Justice, we are told, necessarily requires top-down authority, the power of coercion, the rarified nobility of fluted...
Article
Full-text available
Love supplants power as it is often understood in contemporary justice practice, obliterating it utterly. What, then, fills the vacuum? How can justice hope to endure without any mechanism for coercion? By what mechanism can justice hope to function? This essay will explore briefly Foucault’s thought about power as it functions in contemporary crim...
Article
Background: National professional organizations have recognized pharmacists as essential members of the intensive care unit (ICU) team. Critical care pharmacists’ clinical activities have been categorized as fundamental, desirable, and optimal, providing a structure for gauging ICU pharmacy services being provided. Objective: To determine the impac...
Article
Objective To determine if new pharmacy practitioners express a need and/or desire for motivational interviewing (MI) to be incorporated into pharmacy school curricula. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to North Carolina pharmacists. Need was determined based on respondents’ level of preparedness to counsel in traditional or MI styles at...
Article
Full-text available
This study was initiated at the request of city police department officials to determine if fear of crime is influenced by actual crime occurring within communities. Police officials were interested in understanding community members’ perceptions of crime in the locality in order to effectively focus police efforts and services. Findings suggest re...
Article
Full-text available
Local police agencies throughout the State of Texas have moved increasingly toward more community-oriented approaches to policing. This philosophy embraces the ideas that (a) the police should reach out to communities they typically have excluded and (b) the police should include members of those communities among their ranks. Lesbians and gay men...
Article
Full-text available
The contemporary practice of justice in America most often causes more harm than healing. This essay applies core teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh to American policing theory in order to produce a more effective and compassionate policing model. Caveats and suggestions for implementation are provided.
Article
Full-text available
This study describes the current situation for female wardens by examining their attitudes toward inmate services, programs, and amenities survival; involvement with correctional staff; and identity as a supervisor through their political affiliations and punishment philosophies. Using Noddings’s “caring ethic,” this study sought to determine wheth...
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--Sam Houston State University, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 47-50). Vita.

Network

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
There seems to be a wealth of statistical texts written for the criminal justice/criminology classroom. We want our work to be unique in several aspects: (1) Our work will particularly benefit undergraduate students and practitioners. (2) We only discuss the fundamental concepts in statistics. (3) Our work will perfectly fit in a typical 16-week semester. (4) Instead of teaching SPSS or Stata, we teach undergraduate students and practitioners to use Excel to conduct basic statistical analyses.
Project
"a unified theory of justice and crime"