Michael Della Rocca

Michael Della Rocca
Yale University | YU · Department of Philosophy

About

37
Publications
919
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
326
Citations

Publications

Publications (37)
Chapter
Benedict (Baruch) de Spinoza (1632–1677) was one of the most systematic, inspiring, and influential philosophers of the early modern period. From a pantheistic starting point that identified God with Nature as all of reality, he sought to demonstrate an ethics of reason, virtue, and freedom while unifying religion with science and mind with body. H...
Chapter
Chapter 7 considers the consequences of the Parmenidean Ascent with regard to meaning for the alleged distinction between philosophy and the study of its history. The argument that any such distinction is unintelligible focuses on the disregard of the history of philosophy in certain quarters of analytical philosophy. The argument identifies three...
Chapter
Chapter 1 advances an interpretation of Parmenides as rejecting all distinctions and all non-being and as thus espousing a radical form of monism. Parmenides’ monism is so radical that, according to him, non-being cannot even be thought of or spoken of. Strong textual evidence is marshalled for seeing Parmenides’ rejection of distinctions as driven...
Chapter
The biggest source of resistance to the Parmenidean Ascent is the implausibility of its radically monistic conclusions. Philosophers have been taught to avoid at almost any cost any such implausible or counterintuitive results. Thus, to complete the defense of the Parmenidean Ascent, it is necessary to weaken the hold of the method of intuition and...
Chapter
In making the Parmenidean Ascent, one transcends metaphysical distinctions and is freed from the illusions of relational thinking. This freedom from the burden of attempting to make our words and sentences match or correspond to an independent reality and to invest our thoughts with metaphysical significance promises to enable us finally to see the...
Article
in his characteristically generous and searching discussion of my book, Spinoza, Daniel Garber rightly points out that I structure my interpretation of Spinoza’s system around the principle of sufficient reason (the PSR). This is the principle that, as I and others sometimes put it, each fact has an explanation and is thus not brute, or the princip...
Article
Can one have one's rationalism and subjectivity too? That is, can one endorse a full-blooded Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR)—the claim that everything is intelligible—and yet regard experience of the world from a finite, subjective perspective as a genuine feature of that world? Many have thought not. Viewing the world sub specie aeternitatis—...
Chapter
Nobody likes to be told what to do. But that doesn’t stop Spinoza from making many moral assessments, often harshly negative ones. Thus we find Spinoza branding certain affects as evil or wrong. Indignation, for Spinoza, is “necessarily evil.” Hate “can never be good.” Pity is contrary to the dictates of reason. Scorn, humility, and many other affe...
Chapter
Two Revolutionary Humean Steps Occasionalism as an Heir to Aristotelianism Descartes's Causal Principle and Intelligibility Body-Body Causation Causation Between Minds and Bodies References and Further Reading
Chapter
INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Determinism, broadly speaking, is the doctrine that whatever happens in the world is brought about by causes other than itself. In this sense, all the major philosophers of the seventeenth century – with the possible exception of Male-branche – were determinists. But these same philosophers also believed in human freedom...
Chapter
The Strategy of Meditation IVBelieving at WillFreedomBelieving as We Should and a Cartesian Circle
Chapter
The Metaphysics of MatterThe Metaphysics of MindThe Metaphysics of GodGod, Doubt, and CertaintyDescartes' Reception
Article
Spinoza's response to a certain radical form of scepticism has deep and surprising roots in his rationalist metaphysics. I argue that Spinoza's commitment to the Principle of Sufficient Reason leads to his naturalistic rejection of certain sharp, inexplicable bifurcations in reality such as the bifurcations that a Cartesian system posits between mi...
Article
This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretat...
Article
  I argue that the standard counterexamples to the identity of indiscernibles fail because they involve a commitment to a certain kind of primitive or brute identity that has certain very unpalatable consequences involving the possibility of objects of the same kind completely overlapping and sharing all the same proper parts. The only way to avoid...
Article
Critique de l'argument en faveur de la compatibilite de la responsabilite morale et du determinisme developpe par J. M. Fischer a partir de la position d'H. Frankfurt selon laquelle la responsabilite ne requiert pas d'autres possibilites d'actions. Soulevant le probleme de l'alternative faible que Fischer designe par l'expression tremblement de lib...

Network

Cited By