Michael Christie

Michael Christie
Charles Darwin University | CDU · The Northern Institute

About

67
Publications
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1,186
Citations

Publications

Publications (67)
Chapter
When bilingual education began in remote schools of the Northern Territory only the most basic printing technologies were available. By the time bilingual education was revoked as a government policy thirty years later, schools were well and truly in the digital age. The remarkable evolution of the materialities of teaching and learning was underpi...
Chapter
In dozens of Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, thousands of books in Indigenous Australian languages were produced for use in classrooms, with illustrations by local artists, usually published on site and with a small local distribution. The production of these resources involved a blending of Indigenous knowledges with Western tech...
Chapter
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An impetus to preserve thousands of books produced in Aboriginal languages during the years of bilingual education in the Northern Territory has led to the development of the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages (www.cdu.edu.au/laal). The challenge has been to squeeze a complex range of materials into specific categories which meet the standards...
Article
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In 2013 a perplexity we had been experiencing for some time around the apparently unstoppable proliferation of contexts in which “the public problem” of Indigenous governance emerged came to a head. As members of an informal consultancy team established within the Contemporary Indigenous Knowledge and Governance Group in the policy research institu...
Article
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The fluctuating fortunes of Northern Territory bilingual education programs in Australian languages and English have put at risk thousands of books developed for these programs in remote schools. In an effort to preserve such a rich cultural and linguistic heritage, the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages project is establishing an open access,...
Article
Housing Reference Groups (HRGs) began to be established in remote Northern Territory (NT) Aboriginal communities in 2009 when the Northern Territory Government compulsorily acquired remote Aboriginal housing and closed down 75 Aboriginal Housing associations. In this highly contested context, we were invited to undertake an evaluation of the HRGs....
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Yolŋu Aboriginal understandings of the body, health, life and sickness, and roles their ancestral epistemologies and knowledge practices play in making agreement have seldom been taken seriously in the biomedical world. In this paper, we describe how insights developed in three different cross-cultural collaborative transdisciplinary research proje...
Article
The Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages is coming to life on the Internet at www.cdu.edu.au/laal. As digitised books and other related resources in Aboriginal languages of the Northern Territory are uploaded to the database, its developers are working to configure ways in which the large number of resources in the archive can establish and invig...
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In this article, the authors relate brief stories of episodes spanning a period of 10 years when they worked with Australian Aboriginal groups and individuals as they incorporated digital technologies into their cultural practices. Their story telling is leavened with a dissonant working imaginary designed to interrupt both itself and the stories....
Chapter
The failure of government initiatives in Aboriginal communities, and the invasiveness of much research practice are often attributed by Aboriginal people to a failure of outsiders to sit down, spend time, listen and work things out together.
Article
Gambling by Aboriginal people is increasingly identified as a significant public problem in Australia, eliciting responses mainly concerned with measurement and harm minimisation. We adopt the utilitarian philosophy of John Dewey to critically examine the way this 'problem' is socially constructed. We recast our roles as pragmatic researcher-activi...
Article
Aboriginal Knowledge Narratives and Country: Marri Kunkimba Putj Putj Marrideyan by FordPayi Linda. Post Pressed, Mount Gravatt, 2010, i+ 196pp., ISBN 978 1 921214 71 4 - Volume 40 - Michael Christie
Article
Aboriginal Knowledge Narratives and Country: Marri Kunkimba Putj Putj Marrideyan by FordPayi Linda. Post Pressed, Mount Gravatt, 2010, i+ 196pp., ISBN 978 1 921214 71 4 - Volume 40 - Michael Christie
Article
The 'Teaching from Country' program provided the opportunity and the funding for Yol{eng}u (north-east Arnhem Land Aboriginal) knowledge authorities to participate actively in the academic teaching of their languages and cultures from their remote homeland centres using new digital technologies. As two knowledge systems and their practices came to...
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The Yolngu studies program at Charles Darwin University has been active in the teaching of Yolngu (East Arnhemland Aboriginal) languages and culture, in collaborative transdisciplinary research, and in community engagement for well over ten years. The original undergraduate teaching program was set up under the guidance of Yolngu elders. They insti...
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Our work within the Aboriginal knowledge scoping project has focussed upon developing four key documents for the Board of the CRC: the first a 'position paper' on the nature of the Aboriginal knowledge at work in the desert (including the rights, ethics and responsibilities implied, protection and use, access and benefit-sharing etc), the second a...
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The paper describes an approach to digital design grounded in processes of Indigenous collective memory making. We claim the research should be understood as performative knowledge making, and accounting it should also be performative. Accordingly we present four texts generated in the course of our research as an exhibit. They attest design proces...
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Indigenous Australians are often keen to use digital technologies in their local knowledge practices as part of a struggle to develop sustainable livlihoods on-country. They want to use digital technologies to ensure that 'history stays in-place', seeing their knowledge practices as expressing the remaking of an Ancestral reality. This paper tells...
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Designing software alongside ethnobotanists and Indigenous owners and practitioners of traditional knowledge, brings to light a range of issues which expose some of the assumptions underlying both Western ethnobotany and software design. In collaborating over the development of software to facilitate the use of digital objects in knowledge work, is...
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When "remote education" is seen as something which is delivered from some outside (by definition not remote) agency, rather than something which is grown at home, it is usually constructed as a problem of disadvantage: how do we deliver to remote students the quality cosmopolitan education we offer to kids in the city? Equality of educational oppor...
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Indigenous academic researchers are involved in Indigenist, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, all of which present problems and opportunities for Indigenous knowledge traditions. Transdisciplinary research is different from interdisciplinary research because it moves beyond the disciplinarity of the university and takes into account...
Book
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Extensive research has been carried out on communication between health staff and patients, particularly in the area of doctor-patient communication. Effective communication is recognised as being crucial to achieving optimal health care, yet there have been few investigations of the extent and consequences of miscommunication in the context of Ind...
Article
Aboriginal people are increasingly making use of digitising technologies for their cultural and educational work. However, databases are not innocent objects. They bear within them Western assumptions about the nature of knowledge, and how it is produced, which may inhibit or undermine the intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal knowledge trad...
Article
According to Manovich (2001), the database and the narrative are natural enemies, each competing for the same territory of human culture. Aboriginal knowledge traditions depend upon narrative through storytelling and other shared performances. The database objectifies and commodifies distillations of such performances and absorbs them into data str...
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Full-text available
The notion of social capital has had wide currency in mainstream social policy debate in recent years, with commonly used definitions emphasising three factors: norms, networks and trust. Yolngu Aboriginal people have their own perspectives on norms, networks and trust relationships. This article uses concepts from Yolngu philosophy to explore thes...
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Full-text available
At a recent workshop on Aboriginal knowledge in Darwin, several women from the local Larrakia community talked about putting their elders' knowledge onto a database. One cautious non-indigenous researcher voiced some doubts about the over- enthusiastic embrace of digital technology: "Indigenous knowledge lives in country, and in doing things togeth...
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Full-text available
To identify factors limiting the effectiveness of communication between Aboriginal patients with end-stage renal disease and healthcare workers, and to identify strategies for improving communication. Qualitative study, gathering data through (a) videotaped interactions between patients and staff, and (b) in-depth interviews with all participants,...
Article
When we talk about Aboriginalizing education, we have to find ways of describing or analyzing what happens in education, which will help us to understand what needs to be done. For me, one of the most useful ways of thinking about education is to make a clear distinction between what is taught (the content, or message of education), and how it is t...
Article
When we talk about Aboriginalizing education, we have to find ways of describing or analyzing what happens in education, which will help us to understand what needs to be done. For me, one of the most useful ways of thinking about education is to make a clear distinction between what is taught (the content, or message of education), and how it is t...
Article
In many aspects of formal education we expect Aboriginal children to think, learn and behave as white children. This is an unreasonable expectation because Aboriginal children in their home lives are seldom equipped with those skills which are necessary at school. Worse, teachers often don’t understand what skills are required in school learning be...
Article
Milingimbi is an isolated, traditionally oriented Aboriginal community in the Northern Territory of Australia. A bilingual program in English and Gupapuyngu was started at Milingimbi School in 1973. For four years, children from both English-only and bilingual classes were tested for achievement in academic subjects. By Year 7, the children from bi...
Article
People under pressure often turn to drugs to help them cope with their difficulties. This seems to happen in nearly every culture in the world. Alcohol is the major drug used in Australia – by all the racial groups. Aboriginal children under pressure often turn to petrol sniffing. The habit seems to have been introduced to Aboriginal people in the...
Article
In his book How Children Fail , John Holt talks about the strategies children have for coping with school. The strategies of most children, says Holt, have been consistently self-centred, protective and aimed above all else at avoiding trouble, embarrassment, punishment, disapproval or loss of status. This is particularly true of the ones who have...
Article
In an earlier issue (Vol.4 No.2) Michael Christie told us about the reading program he was using at Mi lingimbi. In this issue he outlines “a number of teaching techniques which are both simple to implement and congruent with what (little) we know about learning styles in Aboriginal children.” Nothing is more depressing for a teacher than to hear...
Article
The Pre-reading program for Gupapuyngu speaking children was largely based upon the lectures of Sarah Gudschinsky given in Darwin in early 1973. The first part of the pre-reading program involved helping the children to learn exactly what reading (and writing) is. In a European culture children often come to school with this understanding, but many...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages project is establishing an open access online repository comprising digital versions of the materials produced in Australian Indigenous languages in the Northern Territory. http://laal.cdu.edu.au
Project
GroundUp is an approach to research and service delivery which develops tools, methods, understandings and practices appropriate for the people, places and organisations with whom we work. We design and negotiate collaborations within and across in a variety of institutional settings, including traditional Indigenous institutions. We work in urban and remote Aboriginal communities with government and nongovernment organisations to develop research and service delivery approaches suitable to diverse participants. Often this will include processes for careful reassessment of the categories and values assumed by academic researchers and funding bodies from the outset.
Project
The ability of Aboriginal communities to develop enterprises applying traditional knowledge in plants. Applications include, Carbon, bush foods, essential oils and bush medicines.