Michael Cameron

Michael Cameron
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA · Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Ph.D. - Conservation Biology

About

57
Publications
14,396
Reads
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1,646
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
842 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Aim Identify hotspots and areas of high species richness for Arctic marine mammals. Location Circumpolar Arctic. Methods A total of 2115 biologging devices were deployed on marine mammals from 13 species in the Arctic from 2005 to 2019. Getis‐Ord Gi* hotspots were calculated based on the number of individuals in grid cells for each species and fo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ice-associated seals rely on sea ice for a variety of activities, including breeding, molting, pupping, and resting. In the Arctic, many of these activities occur in spring (April -- June) as sea ice begins to melt and retreat northward. Rapid acceleration of climate change in Arctic ecosystems is therefore of concern as the quantity and quality of...
Article
Full-text available
A warming climate has driven rapid physical changes in the Arctic environment, particularly in the Bering Sea. Biological changes are also increasingly evident in the Bering Sea and adjacent waters. The ecological results have been profound and relatively well documented for fishes and lower trophic levels. Upper trophic predators such as marine ma...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed how juvenile bearded seals Erignathus barbatus use and move through sea ice and consider how future ice conditions might affect bearded seal distribution and behavior. In October 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2009, we tagged 29 (16 female and 13 male) juvenile (0−2 yr old) bearded seals with Argos satellite transmitters in Kotzebue Sound, Alask...
Article
Full-text available
The first year of life is typically the most critical to a pinniped’s survival, especially for Arctic phocids which are weaned at only a few weeks of age and left to locate and capture prey on their own. Their seasonal movements and habitat selection are therefore important factors in their survival. During a cooperative effort between scientists a...
Data
Supplementary information about the movement model. (PDF)
Article
We collated available satellite telemetry data for six species of ice-associated marine mammals in the Pacific Arctic: ringed seals (Pusa hispida; n=118), bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus, n=51), spotted seals (Phoca largha, n=72), Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens, n=389); bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus, n=46), and five Arctic an...
Article
Full-text available
The Antarctic Pack Ice Seal (APIS) Program was initiated in 1994 to estimate the abundance of four species of Antarctic phocids: the crabeater seal Lobodon carcinophaga, Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddellii, Ross seal Ommatophoca rossii and leopard seal Hydrurga leptonyx and to identify ecological relationships and habitat use patterns. The Atlanti...
Article
Full-text available
Inferences about animal behavior from movement models typically rely solely on location data, but auxiliary biotelemetry and environmental data are powerful and readily available resources for incorporating much more behavioral realism. Integrating multiple data streams can not only reveal hidden behaviors and ecological relationships that would ot...
Article
Full-text available
Logistically demanding and expensive wildlife surveys should ideally yield defensible estimates. Here, we show how simulation can be used to evaluate alternative survey designs for estimating wildlife abundance. Specifically, we evaluate the potential of instrument-based aerial surveys (combining infrared imagery with high-resolution digital photog...
Data
Full-text available
Supplementary simulation study results. Tables describing root mean square error and 90% credible interval coverage for seal and polar bear abundance, as estimated from simulations of instrument-based aerial surveys in the eastern Chukchi Sea.
Data
The Antarctic Pack Ice Seal (APIS) Program was initiated in 1994 to estimate the abundance of four species of Antarctic phocids: the crabeater seal Lobodon carcinophaga, Weddell seal Leptonychotes weddellii, Ross seal Ommatophoca rossii and leopard seal Hydrurga leptonyx and to identify ecological relationships and habitat use patterns. The Atlanti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The seasonal timing of key, annual life history events is an important component of many species' ecology. Seasonal periods important to marine mammals often do not align well with typical labels (i.e., spring, summer, winter, fall). The timing of key life history events is well documented only for species found in accessible rookeries or breeding...
Article
Full-text available
The remote pack ice of the arctic and subarctic seas is challenging to access, yet extremely important to understand and monitor. The pack ice holds the key to understanding ecosystem responses to climate change and is vital habitat for many species including ice-associated seals. Unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) are a new class of tools that may...
Article
Full-text available
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has adopted an integrated ecosystem research approach to understand climate effects on fish, seabirds, and marine mammals in the Arctic. The integrated ecosystem approach combines traditional oceanography, fisheries, and mammal research techniques to improve scientific understanding of how ecos...
Article
1.The Argos satellite telemetry system is popular for studying the movement and space use of marine animals. The life histories of marine mammals, in particular, result in a relatively large proportion of inaccurate locations, thus making analysis methods that do not account for location measurement error inappropriate for these data. Using a new K...
Article
Full-text available
Estimating the abundance of seals inhabiting sea ice is complicated because the areas are large, the ice area and distribution may change rapidly, and it is impractical to detect and count a (typically unknown) portion of the population that is in the water, rather than hauled out on the ice. We propose a method for resolving these issues by using...
Article
Ecologists often use transect surveys to estimate the density and abundance of animal populations. Errors in species classification are often evident in such surveys, yet few statistical methods exist to properly account for them. In this paper, we examine biases that result from species misidentification when ignored, and we develop statistical mo...
Article
Full-text available
Automated detection systems employing advanced technology (e.g. infrared imagery, auditory recording systems, pattern recognition software) are compelling tools for gathering animal abundance and distribution data since investigators can often collect data more efficiently and reduce animal disturbance relative to surveys using human observers.Even...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Bearded, spotted, ribbon and ringed seals are key components of Arctic marine ecosystems and they are important subsistence resources for northern coastal Alaska Native communities. Although these seals are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and bearded and ringed seals have been listed as threatened1 under the Endangered Speci...
Data
Full-text available
The development of models of marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean is becoming increasingly important as a means of understanding and managing impacts such as exploitation and climate change. Collating data from disparate sources, and understanding biases or uncertainties inherent in those data, are important first steps for improving ecosystem m...
Article
We made three sets of population surveys of the four species of ice-inhabiting phocid pinnipeds in the Ross and Amundsen Seas between 26 December 1999 and 24 March 2000 using icebreakers and helicopters deployed from those icebreakers. We used line transect methods to survey 23,671 km by helicopter and 3,694 km by ship accounting for a total covera...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1960s, Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii (Lesson, 1826)) have been tagged and surveyed annually in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Mark–recapture analyses and model selection trials using Akaike's Information Criterion indicate that sex, cohort, and year affect juvenile (ages 1 and 2) survival. In contrast, year and perhaps sex and cohort...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) are one of the most important subsistence resources for the indigenous people of coastal northern and western Alaska, as well as key components of Arctic marine ecosystems, yet relatively little about their abundance, seasonal distribution, migrations, or foraging behaviors has been documented scientifically. Ice...
Article
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Altitude and flight speed affect detection probability and they typically vary during the course of most aerial surveys.We demonstrate how these sources of variation can be accommodated with covariates in a line-transect analysis using data from a pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) survey in Wyoming and a survey of Antarctic ice seals (Lobodon carci...
Article
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Central-place foragers that must return to a breeding site to deliver food to offspring are faced with trade-offs between prey patch quality and distance from the colony. Among colonial animals, pinnipeds and seabirds may have different provisioning strategies, due to differences in their ability to travel and store energy. We compared the foraging...
Article
Full-text available
Site fidelity is believed to be an important life history strategy for Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii), that return to traditional breeding colonies each spring. We examined four hypotheses concerning their fidelity to these colonies: 1) fidelity is stronger to natal sites (natal fidelity) than to other sites, 2) females exhibit greater sit...
Article
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For polygynous mammals with no paternal care, the number of offspring sired is often the sole measure of male reproductive success. The potential for polygyny is highest when resources or other environmental factors such as restricted breeding sites force females to aggregate. In these circumstances, males compete intensely for females and mating s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The distribution of ribbon seals (Histriophoca fasciata) during the breeding season appears largely confined to habitats in the marginal sea ice zones of the Bering Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk. However, until recently, very little has been known of ribbon seals’ whereabouts and behavior during the non-breeding season, particularly during summer and...
Article
Full-text available
Diving animals such as seabirds and marine mammals are top predators foraging under water, and play an important role in the marine ecosystems through foraging behavior. Recently developed animal-borne digital video or still cameras have made it possible to directly observe and estimate the prey richness of a foraging patch with simultaneously reco...
Conference Paper
For polygynous mammals with no paternal care, the number of offspring sired is often the sole measure of male reproductive success. The potential for polygyny is highest when resources or other environmental factors, such as restricted breeding sites, force females to aggregate. In these circumstances males compete intensely for females and mating...
Article
Full-text available
The foraging behavior of predators is influenced by the distribution of prey at different spatial and temporal scales. In marine environments, aquatic animals move in 3 spatial dimensions; however, previous studies of the fine-scale movements of predators were limited to only the vertical component of diving behavior. Here, we have analyzed image d...
Article
Full-text available
The haulout patterns of five adult and two juvenile crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) were documented from February to December 1995 in three areas of the Antarctic. The longest haulout event was 19.2h (mean=7.9, median=7.8); the longest in-water event was 85.8h (mean=15.1, median=14.2). In no month were more than 76% of the adult seals in our...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic animals use a variety of strategies to reduce the energetic cost of locomotion. Efficient locomotion is particularly important for breath-holding divers because high levels of exercise may quickly deplete oxygen reserves, leading to the termination of a dive. We investigated the swimming behavior of eight adult Weddell seals, which are prof...
Article
Full-text available
The under-ice behavior of two free-ranging female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) was studied using geomagnetic, acceleration and velocity sensors at Big Razorback Island in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. The seals' body angle and posture were calculated from the acceleration data and the heading from the geomagnetic intensity data. Together wi...
Article
Full-text available
To better understand the foraging behavior of diving animals it is important to monitor aspects of the animal's environment, including prey distribution, which may influence their behavior. However, prior to recent technological advancements, monitoring the distribution of prey immediately surrounding a diving animal had been impossible. We attache...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the behavioral adaptations of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) that may help them to compensate for decreasing energy stores during lactation. Field studies were conducted from late October to early December in 1999 and 2000 at breeding colonies in Antarctica. Data loggers were attached to adult females with pups aged 12-49 days...
Thesis
Full-text available
The Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) population in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica is one of the best-studied large mammal populations in the world. Since the 1960s, researchers have tagged, surveyed and monitored these animals in Erebus Bay. The resulting long-term data set is invaluable for analyses investigating the variation in their population...
Chapter
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An understanding of the social system, mating strategies and relationships, among individuals in a population is an important component for descriptive models of effective population size and minimum viable population. Demographic data collected on the Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) population in McMurdo Sounds, Antarctica between 1969 and...
Article
Full-text available
The Antarctic Ecosystem Program of the National Marine Mammal Laboratory completed its seal and seabird research at Seal Island, South Shetland Islands, during the 1994-1995 austral summer, the ninth annual field season at the site. This research, in support of the CCAMLR Ecosystem Monitoring Program (CEMP), addressed continuing, long-term objectiv...
Article
Full-text available
As upper trophic level predators with a circumpolar distribution, the antarctic pack ice seals (crabeater, Lobodon carcinophagus; leopard, Hydrurga leptonyx; Ross, Ommatophoca rossii; and Weddell, Leptonychotes weddelli) provide a potential source of information about ecosystem interactions and environmental variability integrated over a wide range...

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