Michael Brown

Michael Brown
Smithsonian Institution · Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Doctor of Philosophy

About

21
Publications
7,747
Reads
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146
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
135 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - September 2019
Dartmouth College
Position
  • PhD Student
April 2013 - September 2014
Princeton University
Position
  • Project Manager ~ Laikipia Zebra Project
January 2012 - May 2012
Columbia University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • "The Behavioral Biology of Living Primates" ~ Dr. Marina Cords
Education
September 2014 - May 2020
Dartmouth College
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
September 2010 - May 2012
Columbia University
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology
February 2008 - May 2008
School for Field Studies
Field of study
  • Wildlife Management and Ecology

Publications

Publications (21)
Preprint
Full-text available
Animals moving through landscapes need to strike a balance between finding sufficient resources to grow and reproduce while minimizing encounters with predators. Because encounter rates are determined by the average distance over which directed motion persists, this trade-off should be apparent in individuals’ movement. Using GPS data from 1,396 in...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Macroecological studies that require habitat suitability data for many species often derive this information from expert opinion. However, expert-based information is inherently subjective and thus prone to errors. The increasing availability of GPS tracking data offers opportunities to evaluate and supplement expert-based information with de...
Article
Full-text available
Giraffe skin disease (GSD) is an emerging disease of free-ranging giraffe recognized in the last 25 years in several species, including the critically endangered Nubian giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis camelopardalis) of Uganda. Identifying the cause of GSD and understanding its impact on health were deemed paramount to supporting these vulnerable...
Article
Full-text available
ContextReduced connectivity across grassland ecosystems can impair their functional heterogeneity and negatively impact large herbivore populations. Maintaining landscape connectivity across human-dominated rangelands is therefore a key conservation priority.Objective Integrate data on large herbivore occurrence and species richness with analyses o...
Chapter
Giraffe are iconic figures across a range of African landscapes but they are currently under considerable conservation threat. Although they are widely distributed throughout 21 different countries, continent-wide populations have declined considerably over the past several decades, highlighted by the International Union for the Conservation of Nat...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Skeletal dysplasias, cartilaginous or skeletal disorders that sometimes result in abnormal bone development, are seldom reported in free-ranging wild animals. Here, we use photogrammetry and comparative morphometric analyses to describe cases of abnormal appendicular skeletal proportions of free-ranging giraffe in two geographically disti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective Skeletal dysplasias, cartilaginous or skeletal disorders that sometimes result in abnormal bone development, are seldom reported in free-ranging wild animals. Here, we use photogrammetry and comparative morphometric analyses to describe cases of abnormal appendicular skeletal proportions of free-ranging giraffe in two geographically disti...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in the technology of biotelemetry are transforming the ways in which we remotely acquire environmental, physiological and behavioural data. Large and heavy batteries, however, continue to reduce the availability of GPS tracking devices for small taxa and for species with morphologies that limit attachment options. Device miniaturisation is...
Article
Full-text available
Partial migration is a common movement phenomenon in ungulates, wherein part of the population remains resident while another portion of the population transitions to spatially or ecologically distinct seasonal ranges. Although widely documented, the causes of variation in movement strategies and their potential demographic consequences are not wel...
Article
Full-text available
Giraffe populations have declined in abundance by almost 40% over the last three decades, and the geographic ranges of the species (previously believed to be one, now defined as four species) have been significantly reduced or altered. With substantial changes in land uses, loss of habitat, declining abundance, translocations, and data gaps, the ex...
Article
Full-text available
To design effective conservation and management strategies at the national scale, it is important to consider population trends across space and time. Here we assessed the near threatened Rothschild's giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi) in Uganda. We applied individual-based photographic surveys to generate abundance estimates for all exta...
Technical Report
Full-text available
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/full/9194/0 Giraffe (Giraffa cameloprdalis) is assessed as Vulnerable under criterion A2 due to an observed, past (and ongoing) population decline of 36-40% over three generations (30 years, 1985-2015). The factors causing this decline (levels of exploitation and decline in area of occupancy and habitat quality) h...
Article
Full-text available
Recent reports suggest that dietary ethanol, or alcohol, is a supplemental source of calories for some primates. For example, slow lorises (Nycticebus coucang) consume fermented nectars with a mean alcohol concentration of 0.6% (range: 0.0–3.8%). A similar behaviour is hypothesized for aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) based on a single point...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation translocation is a management technique employed to introduce, re-introduce or reinforce wild animal and plant populations. Giraffe translocations are being conducted throughout Africa, but the lack of effective post-translocation monitoring limits our ability to assess translocation outcomes. One potential indicator of translocation s...

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