Michael Brennan

Michael Brennan
Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly, Dublin, Ireland · Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly

PhD, MSc Env. Sci., BA Microbiology

About

40
Publications
13,873
Reads
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352
Citations
Introduction
Currently based in the Eastern & Midlands Regional Assembly, my primary research interests include: urban biodiversity; cataloguing and modelling environmental resource use; and creating decision support tools to inform evidence-based policy and planning.
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - present
Eastern & Midland Regional Assembly
Position
  • EU Affairs Officer
Description
  • -Research EU policy to brief the CoR (Irish Members) -Project manage EU projects undertaken by EMRA. -Monitor EU policy impacting Irish regional/local government. -Provide guidance to the Assembly and its constituent local authorities.
May 2016 - March 2017
Eastern & Midland Regional Assembly, Ireland
Position
  • Project Officer
Description
  • Duties: 1)Project manage EMRA input on RESILENS H2020 project, including a)critical review of research, b)formulate assessment methodologies 2)Research support; i)INTERREG proposals review ii)create policy briefs, iii)life sciences expert
September 2015 - September 2017
University College Dublin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Use Remote Sensing, GIS & Statistical Analysis to: 1) Calculate total canopy coverage 2) Determine public/private split of canopy 3) Canopy comparison with other cities 4) Recommendations for canopy development 5) Quantify environmental services provided
Education
May 2006 - July 2010
University College Dublin
Field of study
  • GIS, Urban Biodiversity, Urban Planning, Urban Ecology, Land Cover modelling
September 2004 - September 2005
University College Dublin
Field of study
  • Environmental Science
October 1998 - June 2002
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Microbiology

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Urban green infrastructure provides a number of cultural ecosystem services that are greatly appreciated by the public. In order to benefit from these services, actual contact with the respective ecosystem is often required. Furthermore, the type of services offered depend on the physical characteristics of the ecosystem. We conducted a review of p...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In this study, we are investigated the urban forestry cover of the urban areas in Dublin. This project was conducted in partnership with the four Dublin councils (Fingal, Dublin City, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown and South Dublin) and the Office of Public Works. We quantified the canopy cover area and assessed its spatial distribution, identified the pr...
Chapter
Full-text available
Urban forests (UF) and green infrastructure (GI) – including trees that are not only in woodlands, but also on streets, along streams, in parks, and on roofs – provide important ecosystem services for urban and peri-urban populations. By allowing for urban living in pleasant and healthy surroundings, breaking up the paved and impermeable built envi...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental perceptions are central to individuals' behavioural interactions with the environment. Cognitive maps, portraying a spatial representation of an individual's environmental perception, can be aggregated to gain insight into the collective environmental perception of groups and populations. This paper uses cognitive mapping techniques t...
Article
Urban areas profoundly alter the local atmosphere, hydrology and biology, usually for the worse. Increasing the vegetative cover in urbanised areas is considered an effective way of offsetting many of the undesirable outcomes of urbanisation and is often incorporated as Green Infrastructure into urban development plans. In this paper we present a f...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This research was based on a 12-month desk study that modelled, for identified sample sites, the relationships between health indicators and the availability of green and blue infrastructure (GBI). It provided a route to identify measurable effects and results from a cross-sectional and area-based study.
Article
Full-text available
Continuous Professional Development (CPD) plays an important role in ensuring ongoing quality teaching. In Ireland, the majority of teachers engage in CPD voluntarily. Compulsory CPD is offered to Irish schools on an ad hoc basis. In Finland, compulsory CPD (VESO training) must be completed annually. This study examines three forms of CPD available...
Conference Paper
In recent times, there has been an increased emphasis in research on the environmental and other associated benefits of green infrastructure, particularly in cities. The scale and duration of such studies vary, however, they all begin by mapping the extent and character of existing green infrastructure including parks, gardens, and trees. Tree cove...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A large body of evidence exists showing that the provision of, and access to, a good quality environment has detectable health benefits. These benefits include, inter alia, reduced stress and stress related illness, increased physical activity and higher self-reported satisfaction. While the presence of green and blue infrastructure (GBI) has been...
Conference Paper
The network of urban vegetation present within a city, often termed the ‘green infrastructure’, has become increasingly recognised as crucial the health and well-being of urban residents. Urban green infrastructure provides a host of physical, economic and social benefits; including climate regulation, air pollutant reduction, increases in property...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A number of studies have examined the relationship between land use and/or vegetation indices (principally NDVI) with Land Surface Temperature (LST). However, few studies have examined this relationship across multiple years in order to derive a climatology of LST for urban areas and their surrounds. Fewer still have examined the relationship betwe...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the findings of a use case analysis and economic value study for a national Land Cover and Habitat Mapping (LCHM) Programme in Ireland which was carried out in 2016 for a group of government departments and agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Parks and Wildlife Service of the Department of Art...
Article
Full-text available
Urban areas profoundly alter the local atmosphere, hydrology and biology, usually for the worse. Increasing the vegetative cover in urbanised areas is considered an effective way of offsetting many of the undesirable outcomes of urbanisation and is often incorporated as Green Infrastructure into urban development plans. In this paper we present a f...
Presentation
Full-text available
Green Infrastructure (GI) and Urban Forests (UF) provide important ecosystem services for urban and peri-urban populations. However, particular sections of society such as the income deprived, the disabled and ethnic minority groups may not have the same opportunities and access to GI and UF that more affluent sections of society enjoy. They may al...
Conference Paper
Using GIS to generate national and regional daily meteorological data, we examine how weather affects the fieldwork outcomes of a large-scale survey, the European Social Survey (ESS). The fieldwork period for the ESS usually takes place during the Autumn/Winter seasons. This is a time when weather quality tends to decrease, i.e. days shorten, incre...
Article
Full-text available
Lakes are disproportionately important ecosystems for humanity, containing 77% of the liquid surface freshwater on Earth and comprising key contributors to global biodiversity. With an ever-growing human demand for water and increasing climate uncertainty, there is pressing need for improved understanding of the underlying patterns of natural varia...
Article
Full-text available
Modern flood risk management strategies have evolved from flood resistance to a holistic approach incorporating prevention, protection and preparedness with the aim of reducing the likelihood and/or impact of flooding. This evolution has been driven by a trend of increasingly damaging and frequent flood events due to climate change. Populations at...
Conference Paper
The well documented property boom experienced by Ireland in the 1990s and mid-2000s resulted in large scale land use change in and around Dublin city. Between 1990 and 2006 the artificial surface cover around Dublin city increased from 2631ha in 1990 to 3848ha in 2006. With the expansion of the city the quantity and quality of the urban green space...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The MOLAND land use model was used in several studies to simulate possible scenarios of future settlement patterns in the Greater Dublin Region (GDR). This paper compares the results of three different research outputs with ten possible scenarios for GDR urban development. Brief descriptions of the scenarios and probability maps combining these sce...
Article
Full-text available
The Greater Dublin Area (GDA) has experienced rapid urban expansion over the past 20 years. The development pattern has been described as economically driven and developer-led. These changes have had some well recognised consequences such as urban sprawl, congestion and a decrease in environmental quality. Despite the economic downturn, it is proje...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Urban biodiversity and its importance The importance of biodiversity has been recognised at international level and its preservation and management is supported through key international agreements, such as the Rio Convention (Convention on Biological Diversity, 1992), and nationally, through the National Biodiversity Action Plan. In...
Article
Full-text available
The urban fabric of the Greater Dublin Area (GDA) has expanded rapidly over the past 20 years. This has lead to a decrease in environmental quality throughout the region and disturbance of protected areas. In an effort to guide development toward a more sustainable path in the region the “Strategic Planning Guidelines for the Greater Dublin Area” w...
Article
Full-text available
The urban fabric of the Greater Dublin Area (GDA) has expanded rapidly over the past 20 years. In an effort to coordinate development across the region the “Strategic Planning Guidelines for the Greater Dublin Area” were introduced in 1999. These were updated in 2004 as the “Regional Planning Guidelines: Greater Dublin Area 2004-2016” and are curre...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of the MOLAND model calibration and validation for the Greater Dublin Region (GDR). Having landuse data for three time periods (1990, 2000 and 2006) gives a rare opportunity to apply the classic "calibrate and validate" approach. But economic growth uctuations in Ireland from 1990 to 2006 cause some challenges for ca...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the data preparation and processing steps that were taken to provide inputs for the MOLAND model application for the Greater Dublin Region. The model requires spatial and socioeconomic data by county for the beginning and end years of the calibration period i.e. 1990, 2000 and 2006. In addition, projections of socio-economic var...
Article
Full-text available
Between 1990 and 2006, the Dublin Region was amongst the most rapidly growing urban areas in Europe. The increase in population and industry presents particular challenges for spatial planning. The aim of the Urban Environment Project (UEP, www.uep.ie) is to provide spatial data and forecasts of future land-use patterns by using dynamic urban model...
Article
Full-text available
The MOLAND project's aim is to provide spatial planning tools that can be used to assess, monitor and model the development of urban and regional environments. To date it has been applied to an area of over 70,000km2 across Europe. MOLAND's use as a tool for the assessment and forecasting of biodiversity is examined with Dublin city as a case study...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
What statistical methods are useful for quantifying the weather effects?
The weather variables would be the independent variables.

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
There are multiple lines of evidence showing that individuals and communities near, and with access to, good quality environments have detectable health benefits. These benefits include stress reduction, higher levels of physical activity and better health perception. However, while the presence of green and blue infrastructure (GBI) has been shown to improve health outcomes, the literature lacks consensus as to the magnitude of effect GBI elements, such as parks, water bodies, etc., have on health. Additionally, most research in this area appears to be “GBI led”, that is studies are performed where GBI data is available. This proposal is constructed from a "health-led" perspective, i.e. it seeks to examine the GBI/health interaction using sites of interest chosen based on existing health data, with subsequent characterisation of the GBI elements in these sites of interest. Drawing on international research and best practice, as well as the most up to date Irish health data, this research seeks to inform the discussion around environment and health by identifying areas of high and low reported health and then characterising configurations of elements contributing these health outcomes.