Michael H. Becker

Michael H. Becker
American University Washington D.C. | AU · Department of Justice, Law and Criminology

Master of Arts

About

6
Publications
4,284
Reads
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52
Citations
Introduction
Michael H. Becker is a Doctoral Student at American University in the Justice, Law, and Criminology program. He has a M.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland. His work focuses on radicalization and violent extremism and aims to develop empirical strategies for understanding how individuals come to engage in political crime and criminal violence.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Worked under Dr. Gary LaFree coordinating work through the Maryland Governor’s Office on Crime Control and Prevention (GOCCP) and the Maryland Crime Research and Innovation Center (MCRIC).
August 2018 - September 2019
University of Maryland, College Park
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Worked under Dr. Gary LaFree, collaborating with colleagues in the analysis and drafting of manuscripts using quantitative and qualitative data from the Profiles in Individual Radicalization in the United States dataset.
May 2018 - August 2018
United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • Conducted research and provided analysis on the topics of terrorism, transnational organized crime, cybercrime, and human trafficking. Aided in drafting of grant applications and professional reports.
Education
September 2015 - December 2017
University of Maryland, College Park
Field of study
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice
September 2009 - May 2013
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Psychology and Spanish Studies

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
The United States has adopted the targeted killing of high-ranking members of terrorist organizations to disrupt terrorist networks and exert general deterrence. The most salient of these killings occurred on 2 May 2011, when US Navy Seals killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Although general deterrence suggests this should result in decreased subse...
Article
Full-text available
This research examines the relationship between social control and social learning variables on involvement in violent vs. non-violent extremism. Using data from the Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States (PIRUS) database (n = 1,757), this study presents a series of logistic regressions. Among radicalized individuals, weaker soc...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines how attitudes of activism and systematic decision-making are related to support for political violence. Using unique data from a randomly selected sample of undergraduate and graduate students (n = 503), this study explores how activism, systematic decision-making, and political affiliation coincides with existing support for po...
Article
Full-text available
There is a paucity of research comparing gang members and domestic extremists and extant studies find few explicit linkages. Despite this, there remains a great deal of interest in possible similarities between these criminal groups. Driving this interest is the possibility of adapting policies and practices aimed at preventing entry into criminal...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The proliferation of public WiFi networks in small businesses, academic institutions, and municipalities allows users to access the Internet from various public locations. Unfortunately, the nature of these networks pose serious risks to users' security and privacy. As a result, public WiFi users are encouraged to adopt a range of self-protective b...
Thesis
Full-text available
In criminological research, scholars present learning and social control theories as competing explanations for criminal behavior. While this has extended to specific offenses and analogous behaviors, it has less frequently been related to ideologically-motivated extremist behavior. This study considers the explanatory power of these two schools of...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This project is a prospectively designed web-scraper for all official accounts of members of the United States Congress, all U.S. state Governors, as well as several Federal Executive positions most relevant to public communication around political violence.
Project
Examine support for, and involvement in political violence.