Michael G. Andreu

Michael G. Andreu
University of Florida | UF · School of Forest Resources and Conservation

Doctor of Philosophy

About

120
Publications
17,008
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556
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2005 - April 2016
University of Florida
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (120)
Article
Full-text available
Research that illuminates causes of urban forest storm damage is valuable for planning and management. However, logistical and safety concerns often delay post-storm surveys in urban areas; thus, surveys may include observations with unverified sources of damage. While this uncertainty is often ignored, it can make up a high proportion of the numbe...
Article
Full-text available
Managing longleaf pine ecosystems requires mimicking natural processes such as fire regimes, and balancing sometimes competing management actions (Katherine Kirkman and Jack 2017, Figure 1). Landscape-scale fire was historically a major driver of both the ecosystem services and the species composition of natural communities in longleaf pine ecosyst...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite the abundance of tree diversity in the natural world, and generally high tree species richness in urban areas, urban forests continue to be dominated by a limited number of species. As socio-ecological systems, urban forests are shaped by historical and current management efforts and decision-making of a wide range of human actors. Drawing...
Preprint
Full-text available
While many practitioners and experts understand the risks associated with low urban tree diversity, they often lack the ability to rectify issues they encounter on their own. The current system of tree production and procurement is complex – shaped by market pressures, nursery and site constraints, local governance, and differing professional objec...
Article
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Land-use and land-cover (LULC) change is a primary driver of terrestrial carbon release, often through the conversion of forest into agriculture or expansion of urban areas. Classification schemes are a key component of landscape analyses. This study creates a novel LULC classification scheme by incorporating ecological data to redefine classes of...
Article
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Urban Tree Canopy (UTC) greatly enhances the livability of cities by reducing urban heat buildup, mitigating stormwater runoff, and filtering airborne particulates, among other ecological services. These benefits, combined with the relative ease of measuring tree cover from aerial imagery, have led many cities to adopt management strategies based o...
Article
Full-text available
Urban forests provide critical environmental benefits, but the resilience of these socio-ecological systems to stresses like pest and disease outbreaks relies on tree health and diversity. Despite this, low species diversity continues to be a challenge in urban forest management. Using a participatory research approach in central Florida (United St...
Article
In this document we introduce a standardized set of seven terms compiled by the members of the UF|IFAS Invasive Species Council that can describe most situations involving invasive species. We do so to promote a common language among Florida’s Extension and outreach professionals. This will limit confusion caused by excessive jargon used to describ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Urban Tree Canopy (UTC) greatly enhances the livability of cities by reducing urban heat buildup, mitigating stormwater runoff, and filtering airborne particulates, among other ecological services. These benefits, combined with the relative ease of measuring tree cover from aerial imagery, have led many cities to adopt management strategies based o...
Article
In the subtropics, climate change is pushing woody mangrove forests into herbaceous saltmarshes, altering soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools, with implications for coastal wetland productivity and C and N exports. We quantified total C and N pools, and mobile fractions including extractable mineral N, extractable organic C and N, and active (ae...
Article
Many cities actively manage their urban trees in an effort to increase canopy coverage, manipulate species and size distributions, and maximize associated environmental and social benefits. As development is one of the most significant factors limiting tree abundance and health, many local governments have enacted policies or ordinances which attem...
Article
Hurricane season is June 1 through November 30. Powerful storms that venture inland can damage forest and agricultural land and enterprises. There is no way to fully prepare for major devastation in advance, but this publication provides some strategies and steps you can take to get yourself and your land ready so that you can recover as quickly an...
Article
While often considered “open grown,” urban trees are often found in relatively close proximity to neighboring trees, buildings, and other elements of urban infrastructure. These spatial arrangements may provide wind protection during severe weather events such as hurricanes. Beyond this very local scale, urban tree abundance and condition are often...
Article
Full-text available
Hydric forest communities within the Tampa Bay Watershed were inventoried to assess the effect of urbanization on these systems. Based on aerial photography and site visits, 85 hydric plots were assigned a legacy class—remnant (forest, pre-1948), emergent (forest, post 1948), and managed (actively managed grass on plot). On each plot, diameter at b...
Article
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This study investigates the effect of land-use and land cover (LULC) change on above-ground tree carbon (AGTC) in a subbasin of the Tampa Bay Watershed, Florida. LULC change was integrated with AGTC to project future quantities under three landscape scenarios: baseline, increased and aggressive rates of development. A 12% increase in total landscap...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We conducted an aerial canopy analysis of Florida's 29 metro- and micropolitan regions and calculated carbon sequestration , stormwater mitigation, and air pollution filtration benefits using the USDA Forest Service's iTree Canopy ecosystem service model.
Article
This new 13-page article combines canopy coverage data from all of Florida's metropolitan and micropolitan areas with ecological models developed by the USDA Forest Service to calculate several key benefits of urban trees and an approximation of their monetary value. Benefits of urban trees include carbon sequestration/storage, air pollution filtra...
Article
Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in managing and restoring southern pine stands using uneven-aged silvicultural strategies, that rely on natural regeneration. Group selection harvests are regarded as an effective approach to induce natural regeneration and convert pine plantations to uneven-aged stands. In a wet flatwoods site in n...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many cities actively manage their urban trees in an effort to increase canopy coverage, manipulate species and size distributions, and maximize associated environmental and social benefits. As development is one of the most significant factors limiting tree abundance and health, many local governments have enacted policies or ordinances which attem...
Article
Full-text available
The excessive number of terms associated with invasive species, and their often incorrect usage, hinders stakeholder education about the threats of invasive species. Here we introduce seven terms (native, nonnative, introduced, established, invasive, nuisance, and range change) that are applicable across invasive taxa, understandable, typically int...
Article
Full-text available
This 7-page fact sheet written by John Dooner and Michael Andreu and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation outlines a process called timber cruising, surveying timber inventory to estimate the current volume and value of a timber stand. The authors explain the process of timber cruising from initial tree-level measure...
Article
Tree roots often come in conflict with elements of the built environment, particularly when planted in limited soil locations. For street trees located between roadways and sidewalks, minimum planting width requirements can be calculated to prevent large supporting roots from lifting or growing over paved surfaces. In this study, we used diameter a...
Article
Full-text available
This 2-page fact sheet written by Michael G. Andreu, Caroline A. Hament, David A. Fox, and Robert J. Northrop and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation describes a 2016 ecological assessment of the urban forest in the city of Gainesville, FL. It provides a detailed look into some of the economic and ecological values...
Article
Full-text available
The urban forest is a crucial factor in the well-being of a community because of the aesthetics, health benefits, and cost-savings that it provides. The urban forest is our habitat, and we must manage it in ways that will provide the benefits we need and desire. This 3-page fact sheet written by Michael G. Andreu, Caroline A. Hament, David A. Fox,...
Article
Many cities around the world have set ambitious urban tree canopy cover goals, with the expectation that urban forests will provide ecosystem services as functional green infrastructure. Numerous studies have examined intra-city spatial patterns in urban tree canopy (UTC) and found that UTC relates to socioeconomic indicators and urban form. Additi...
Article
Full-text available
Trees in cities were formerly thought of merely as a collection of individuals found along streets and incorporated into landscaping. However, urban trees are now viewed as being part of a unique forest type, and understanding the urban forest’s structure and composition is an important first step towards managing it. This 4-page fact sheet written...
Article
Lianas (woody climbing plants) often abound in tropical forests after selective logging and other disturbances. Liana cutting is an often-prescribed but seldom applied silvicultural treatment designed to foster the growth of future crop trees (hereafter: FCTs). Small-scale studies indicate that this treatment is effective, but little is known about...
Article
Full-text available
Denitrification is the anaerobic, microbial transformation of nitrate (NO 3-) into inert, atmospheric nitrogen (N) under ideal conditions. It is a critical process in the management of anthropogenic NO 3-, and has been shown to respond to elevated N concentrations within the soil of urban riparian zones. We investigated the relationship between lan...
Article
This 3-page fact sheet written by Byron Love, Michael Andreu, and Chris Demers and published by the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation summarizes a study to determine whether landowners may gain increased economic returns if they mark the first thinning in a southern pine stand. The study found that marking can indeed bring higher...
Article
Effective and efficient prioritization of invasive species treatments is an important aspect of land management and ecological restoration, as the number and distribution of invasive species increase and budgets decrease. Land managers have a multitude of prioritization frameworks from which to choose, but the vast majority only consider entire spe...
Article
Full-text available
The lack of knowledge regarding many aerial insectivorous bats and their relationships with forest characteristics limits conservation decision-making for tropical rainforests and for this important bat group. Therefore, our objective was to understand the effects of forest structure and composition on these bats in the Neotropical evergreen broadl...
Article
Too often, we tend to overlook the many benefits trees provide to urban and urbanizing communities. Properly located trees can reduce air pollution, improve water quality, lower heating and cooling costs, minimize storm water runoff, decrease soil erosion, lessen the urban heat island effect, buffer noise pollution, provide habitat for wildlife, in...
Article
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Lands enrolled in voluntary forest management and conservation programs, like the Forest Stewardship Program, promote good land management practices. In addition to benefiting the landowners enrolled in these programs, good land management provides ecosystem services to society. The Stewardship Ecosystem Services Survey calculated the physical and...
Article
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Bay trees in Florida can be difficult to distinguish because their leaves all look alike at first glance. The leaves of bays are all simple, large, elliptical, and evergreen. In addition, several bay species grow in overlapping ranges and habitats. Many times, two or more different species of bay will be found growing right next to one other. This...
Article
Thinning is an important silvicultural practice that redistributes the growth potential of the site to the best trees. Diameter growth rates are maintained or increased on residual trees after thinning, which increases the return on investment from higher-value trees. Biologically, thinning accelerates stand development by favoring the tallest, bes...
Article
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Identifying species found in Smilax the genus can be difficult because species resemble one another closely. One must be careful to use detailed descriptions in order to correctly identify a specimen. Smilax species are important because they can provide shelter and food for wildlife and have provided humans with medicine, food, and dyes. Twelve Sm...
Article
The purpose of this fact sheet is to help identify a few of the more common woody plant species found in Florida’s scrub ecosystems. In the individual plant descriptions, words that appear in bold font are considered to be key field characteristics that will aid in identification of the species. This 14-page fact sheet was written by Lynn Proenza a...
Article
The restoration of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem types ranging from xeric uplands to hydric flatwoods is the goal of significant management efforts in the southeastern United States. Overstory species composition across ecosystem types varies from pure longleaf to mixed species stands, with slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) bec...
Article
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Leucaena leucocephala, White Leadtree (FOR299/FR367) In Florida, white leadtree is a prohibited species and therefore is not used in commercial applications in the state. However, in its native range it is used as a source of charcoal, fuel, and lumber. It has also been planted as a windbreak for crops such as coffee and cocoa, and some ranchers us...
Article
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Gleditsia aquatica, Water Locust (FOR301/FR369) Water locust’s wide, spreading root system and affinity for hydric conditions makes it a useful specimen for erosion control on wet banks of freshwater systems. While not widely available, planting this tree in residential yards or other public locations may be less than ideal, since the long and shar...
Article
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Casuarina equisetifolia, Australian Pine (FOR298/FR366) Australian pine was originally planted in Florida in the late 1800′s as a windbreak and for shade. But soon thereafter it was spreading without help from humans. Today it is considered a category I invasive species in Florida, and the Division of Plant Industry strictly prohibits possessing, t...
Article
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Cassia leptophylla, Gold Medallion Tree (FOR295/FR363) The gold medallion tree is planted primarily as a shade tree or as a decorative specimen for the yard or street. Many people like this tree because of its fast growth rate and showy, bright yellow clusters of flowers that bloom in the summer months. This tree loses its leaves for a very short p...
Article
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Cassia afrofistula, Kenyan Cassia (FOR296/FR364) The Kenyan cassia can be used as a showy ornamental tree or shrub, with its dark foliage and bright yellow flowers. Some people find the seed pods to be unattractive and prune the tree after it flowers to prevent pods from developing. This tree tolerates a wide range of soil types and can be used in...
Article
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Fortunella spp., Kumquat (FOR300/FR368) Many people find kumquat trees attractive and useful yard specimens. Their dark green leaves and contrasting bright orange fruits give them ornamental quality, and their relatively small size makes them easy to care for once they’re established. Because kumquats generally require less care than other citrus t...
Article
This poisonous tree is native to southern Florida, the Keys, many of the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America. Though it is poisonous to humans and many animals, iguanas eat the fruit and sometimes live among the tree’s limbs. It’s found along the seacoasts and in brackish swamps where it grows among mangroves. Each leaf has a small gland...
Article
Agroforestry systems have received global attention lately as a strategy for carbon mitigation but still are one of the least studied systems. This study was conducted in south Florida to develop biomass equations for windbreak grown cadaghi (Corymbia torelliana) trees and to estimate biomass in various aged windbreaks. Trees were selected for dest...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Urban watersheds are heterogeneous, often including complex forest structure and dynamics. Our understanding of the importance of legacy in hydric forest systems is lacking for subtropical urban watersheds. This study focused on hydric sites in the Hillsborough River watershed within the greater Tampa Bay Watershed, Fl...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Human activities have accelerated the deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) to the biosphere. Excess N supply has unfavorable consequences, generating interest in identifying ecosystem structures that contribute to N retention. This interest is keen in productive mangrove forests and salt marshes that buffer coastal wate...
Article
A GIS can be used in land management to document existing conditions, plan future operations, and archive completed work. Farming applications include soil productivity for different crops, crop yield prediction, and determining fertilizer and pesticide application rates. Forestry applications include estimating forest stand acreage, determining fo...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the effects of various anthropogenic factors on urban soil properties in subtropical, coastal Tampa, FL, USA. Specifically, we explored the influence of (i) urbanization as measured by land use, land cover, population density and years since urban development and (ii) socioeconomic conditions as reflected in household income and pro...
Article
Full-text available
Because windbreaks are planted for sustainable agriculture but may lower crop yields near them due to competition, suitable competition mitigation methods must be applied at the windbreak-crop interface to increase crop yields. Effective underground competition management requires information on important root variables such as preferential root gr...
Article
Full-text available
comparison of software providers, customization options, and data-entry time estimates for each software. After twelve years much of the information is outdated due to the rapid development of new technology and software upgrades. In 2006, the University of Florida held
Chapter
Full-text available
While the biological and ecological role of agroforestry (AF) on climate change mitigation has received considerable research attention lately, the role of socio-psychological factors in this context has been left largely unexplored. Socio-psychological variables such as culture, demography, economy, and social values play important roles in farmer...
Article
Full-text available
In Florida, air-potato is an invasive weed with high management priority, which may soon be targeted using classical biological control. This yam was introduced during the early 20th century by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) from areas throughout its extensive range. Our objectives were to characterize the genetic diversity of t...
Article
Community involvement in gathering and submitting spatially referenced data via web mapping applications has recently been gaining momentum. Urban forest inventory data analyzed by programs such as the i-Tree ECO inventory method is a good candidate for such an approach. In this research, we tested the feasibility of using spatially referenced data...
Article
FOR 240, a 2-page fact sheet by Heather V. Quintana, Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, and Mary McKenzie, describes this palm with a distinctive triangular shape to its trunk, which is endemic to the southeasternmost part of Madagascar and thrives in poor, dry soils—scientific and common names, description, allergen, and applications. Include...
Article
FOR 256, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, Heather V. Quintana, and Robert Northrop, describes this native deciduous tree found in the wet soils of swamps, flatwoods, bottomlands, and riverbanks throughout the southeastern United States — scientific and common names, description, allergen, and application...
Article
FOR 241, a 2-page fact sheet by Melissa H. Friedman, Michael G. Andreu, Heather V. Quintana, and Mary McKenzie, describes this palm with a spindly stem, which is endemic to the Mascarene Islands east of Madagascar, and which in the U.S. grows in south Florida, southern California, and the Hawaiian Islands – scientific and common names, description,...
Article
FOR 254, a 2-page fact sheet by Robert J. Northrop, Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this evergreen cycad native to the tropical islands of southern Japan, but grows well in the subtropics of the United States — scientific and common names, description, allergen, and applications. Includes re...
Article
FOR 255, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, Heather V. Quintana, and Robert Northrop, describes this small native tree found in open to partially shaded areas along the moist edges or slopes of floodplains, river banks, and wet woodlands throughout the southeastern United States — scientific and common nam...
Article
FOR 251, a 2-page fact sheet by Heather V. Quintana, Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, and Mary McKenzie, describes this small palm tree native to eastern Queensland that is good to use in small residential yards because it does not require much growing space — scientific and common names, description, allergen, and applications. Includes ref...
Article
FOR 243, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this native oak, naturally found in the dry, xeric habitats of sandy ridges and coastal dunes throughout most of Florida and coastal Alabama, Georgia, and the southern portion of South Carolina — scientific and common names, des...
Article
FOR 262, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this native deciduous tree found in the bottomlands, floodplains, and swamps of southern Virginia, south to northwest Florida, west to southeastern Texas, and north through the Mississippi River Valley – scientific and common na...
Article
FOR 265, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, Heather V. Quintana, and Robert J. Northrop, describes this small evergreen tree found in the sun belt of the United States, including Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Arizona, California, and Hawaii – scientific and common names, description, allergen, and application...
Article
FOR 239, a 2-page fact sheet by Melissa H. Friedman, Michael G. Andreu, Heather V. Quintana, and Mary McKenzie, describes this deciduous tree found along sandy ridges and mixed forests from Virginia south to Florida and west to Texas — scientific and common names, description, allergen, and applications. Includes references. Published by the UF Sch...
Article
FOR 246, a 2-page fact sheet by Robert J. Northrop, Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this slow-growing palm native to India and southern portions of Pakistan – scientific and common names, description, allergen, and applications. Includes references. Published by the UF School of Forest Resou...
Article
FOR 266, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, Heather V. Quintana, and Robert J. Northrop, describes this semi-deciduous fig tree that is native to Florida and naturally found in tropical hammocks throughout south Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, the West Indies and some regions in Central America – scie...
Article
FOR 242, a 2-page fact sheet by Mary McKenzie, Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this palm endemic to the scrublands of the rocky northeastern peninsula of Australia — scientific and common names, description, and applications. Includes references. Published by the UF School of Forest Resources and Conservat...
Article
FOR 258, a 2-page fact sheet by Michael G. Andreu, Melissa H. Friedman, Mary McKenzie, and Heather V. Quintana, describes this native and small-statured tree that grows best on sandy and dry soils throughout the southeastern United States, from Virginia south to Florida, west to Texas, and north to Kansas — scientific and common names, description,...