Micha Jackson

Micha Jackson
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Biological Sciences

About

29
Publications
21,692
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
971
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
937 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples’ lands cover over one‐quarter of Earth's surface, a significant proportion of which is still free from industrial‐level human impacts. As a result, Indigenous Peoples and their lands are crucial for the long‐term persistence of Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem services. Yet, information on species composition on these lands glo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples’ lands cover over one-quarter of the Earth’s surface, a significant proportion of which is still free from industrial-level human impacts. As a result, Indigenous Peoples’ lands are crucial for the long-term persistence of Earth’s biodiversity and ecosystem services. Yet, information on species composition within Indigenous Peopl...
Article
Full-text available
Highlights from international meetings on migratory waterbird conservation in the Asia-Pacific - Volume 53 Issue 2 - Eduardo Gallo-Cajiao, Micha V. Jackson, Tong Mu, Richard A. Fuller
Article
Full-text available
Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which sh...
Technical Report
The Far Eastern Curlew (FEC) is the largest migratory shorebird in the world. It is listed as Critically Endangered under the Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 in Australia with numbers rapidly declining. Recent research has highlighted the importance of high quality non-breeding habitat to migratory shorebirds, but it is di...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the scale, location and nature conservation values of the lands over which Indigenous Peoples exercise traditional rights is central to implementation of several global conservation and climate agreements. However, spatial information on Indigenous lands has never been aggregated globally. Here, using publicly available geospatial res...
Chapter
From its beginnings in the 1960s, shorebird monitoring in Australia has grown into a national effort generating high-quality information about a large group of migratory and non-migratory waterbirds. Robust information on trends, combined with detailed demographic monitoring and studies of bird movements, has revealed drastic declines, particularly...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal armouring and the reclamation of intertidal areas through the use of seawalls and other artificial structures has been practiced for thousands of years, but its recent expansion in China and elsewhere in Asia has been unprecedented in its rate and intensity. One result has been the recent loss of nearly two-thirds of tidal flats in the Yell...
Article
The Little Egret Egretta garzetta is widespread across Eurasia, Africa and Australasia. Global subspecific taxonomy has been problematic and remains somewhat unresolved. Marchant and Higgins recognised two subspecies: the nominate E. g. garzetta (widespread in Eurasia east to Japan, and Africa) and E. g. nigripes (range encompassing parts of Indone...
Article
Full-text available
Singapore hosts international efforts for conserving migratory waterbirds in the Asia-Pacific - Volume 51 Issue 2 - Eduardo Gallo-Cajiao, Micha V. Jackson, Stephanie Avery-Gomm, Richard A. Fuller
Technical Report
Full-text available
Migratory shorebirds including far eastern curlew, a regional endemic, have experienced severe declines in recent decades in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. Significant numbers of many species spend their non-breeding season in Australia, where disturbance, particularly at high tide roosts, causes negative impacts. Lack of safe roosts may const...
Article
Full-text available
The attitudes of the owners or managers of properties potentially supporting populations of night parrot (Pezoporus occidentalis) in western Queensland, Australia, were explored using interviews to understand whether they would be sympathetic to the species’ conservation. Eighteen interviews were carried out by a former member of the local grazing...
Article
Full-text available
The Gulf of Carpentaria region is sparsely populated and holds important areas of waterbird habitat that are generally under-surveyed. Here we describe one such area whose importance is becoming better known as a result of a collaboration that started in 2012 involving the Mapoon Land and Sea Rangers, the North Australian Indigenous Land and Sea Ma...
Article
Full-text available
Many have argued that monitoring conducted exclusively by scientists is insufficient to address ongoing environmental challenges. One solution entails the use of mobile devices in broadly-applied participatory monitoring (PM) programs. But how digital data entry affects programs with varying levels of stakeholder participation, from volunteer data...
Article
The current status of the Endangered Yellow Chat Alligator Rivers subspecies Epthianura crocea tunneyi is poorly known. A survey of Kakadu National Park floodplains, Northern Territory, in 2004 identified the western floodplain of the South Alligator River as a key population area. To provide preliminary information on the status of the subspecies...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic ecosystems are critical to the long-term viability and vibrancy of communities and economies across northern Australia. In a region that supports significant cultural and ecological water values, partnerships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous stakeholders can benefit aquatic ecosystem management. We present, as a case study from the Kim...
Article
Full-text available
Contemporary land and sea management – driven by community-based planning and informed by traditional and local knowledge and scientific research – can significantly improve both biodiversity and cultural outcomes. Here, we describe the context and process of developing a boat-based survey approach to marine turtle monitoring by Indigenous rangers...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Wunambal Gaambera Aboriginal Corporation, its Uunguu Rangers, NAILSMA and CSIRO are working together to develop a new method for monitoring marine turtles (Mangguru) and dugongs (Balguja). The collaborative research supports the Wunambal Gaambera Healthy Country Plan, which sets out the aspirations of Traditional Owners to manage and maintain t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although boat-based surveys are not currently used to monitor the distribution and abundance of marine turtles over extensive areas in Australia, there are significant advantages in doing so at local and regional scales. For example, local feeding populations in Wunambal Gaambera country comprise primarily green turtles and, in contrast, most local...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents results of a field trial conducted at Montgomery Reef, Western Australia in August 2012 of the dedicated boat-­‐based I-­‐Tracker Turtle and Dugong Survey application. The project is a collaboration between the Dambimangari Rangers, the Kimberley Land Council (KLC), NAILSMA and CSIRO. The survey method and I-­‐Tracker applicati...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Early in the turtle and dugong boat-based monitoring project planning the possibility for incorporating! a seagrass data collection and monitoring component was discussed and thought to be desirable if time and budget permitted once!the project was!underway.Prior to the field trip a seagrass consultant with a background in seagrass mapping and moni...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Indigenous communities have increasingly been expressing their aspirations for the management of their marine and coastal environments through a process known as sea country planning. The Wunambal Gaambera Aboriginal Corporation, representing the Traditional Owner community associated with the Uunguu Native Title Determination, has chosen to create...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Wunambal Gaambera Aboriginal Corporation, Uunguu Rangers, NAILSMA and CSIRO are working together to develop a new method for monitoring marine turtles (Mangguru) and dugongs (Balguja). The project will support the Wunambal Gaambera Healthy Country Plan, which sets out the aspirations of Traditional Owners to manage and maintain their country....
Article
Despite increasing research effort and conservation focus on sharks, small species of little commercial value are often overlooked, although they make a considerable contribution to global diversity. The poorly known Colclough's shark, Brachaelurus colcloughi, is naturally rare to uncommon and is encountered only irregularly. Collating all known re...
Article
Full-text available
North Australia is a significant reservoir for biodiversity and contains some of the least impacted ecosystems found anywhere, but it also faces a range of environmental threats. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island peoples living in north Australia have gained significant legal recognition of their rights to own and manage their traditional lands....

Network

Cited By