Meseret Menberu

Meseret Menberu
University of Oulu · Department of Process and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Sc (Tech)

About

18
Publications
3,589
Reads
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281
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
275 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
2016201720182019202020212022010203040506070
Additional affiliations
February 2013 - present
University of Oulu
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
In northern peatlands, near‐saturated surface conditions promote valuable ecosystem services such as carbon storage and drinking water provision. Peat saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) plays an important role in maintaining wet surface conditions by moderating drainage and evapotranspiration. Peat Ksat can exhibit intense spatial variability...
Article
Full-text available
Undisturbed peatlands are effective carbon sinks and provide a variety of ecosystem services. However, anthropogenic disturbances, especially land drainage, strongly alter peat soil properties and jeopardize the benefits of peatlands. The effects of disturbances should therefore be assessed and predicted. To support accurate modeling, this study de...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of seasonally frozen ground (SFG) on water, energy, and solute fluxes is important in cold climate regions. The hydrological role of permafrost is now being actively researched, but the influence of SFG has received less attention. Intuitively, SFG restricts (snowmelt) infiltration, thereby enhancing surface runoff and decreasing soil...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Peatland ecosystems are complex mosaics and located often in low-lying transitional zones between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Peatlands in its pristine state play a significant role in regulating the hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological functions and act as long-term storage for carbon. However, up to 20% of the global peatland resou...
Conference Paper
Erosion and sedimentation play a significant role in river morphology and are among the most important issues in river engineering. Riverbank protection is one of the common efforts in river engineering to stop or reduce the rate of side erosion in rivers. Riprap is one of the simplest and most economical river protection methods due to constructio...
Article
Assessment and monitoring of river morphology own an important role in river engineering; since, changes in river morphology including erosion and sedimentation affect river cross-sections and flow processes. An approach for River Morphodynamics Analysis based on Remote Sensing (RiMARS) was developed and tested on the case of Mollasadra dam constru...
Article
Large‐scale peat extraction, in Finland and elsewhere, typically takes place on rather small extraction sites, but has major impacts on surrounding aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The environmental conditions prior to drainage (baseline conditions) must be quantified in a statutory environmental impact assessment (EIA), but this is generally di...
Article
Potential benefits of peatland restoration by rewetting include carbon sequestration, restored biodiversity, and improved hydrological functions. There is great uncertainty about how catchment hydrological processes change after restoration, with a particular lack of well‐documented catchment runoff data. This study compared five formerly Disturbed...
Article
Drainage is known to affect peatland natural hydrology and water quality, but peatland restoration is considered to ameliorate peatland degradation. Using a replicated BACIPS (Before-After-Control-Impact Paired Series) design, we investigated 24 peatlands, all drained for forestry and subsequently restored, and 19 pristine control boreal peatlands...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration impact of forestry-drained peatlands on runoff water quality and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrient export was studied. Eight catchments were included: three mesotrophic (one undrained control, two treatments), two ombrotrophic (one drained control, one treatment) and three oligotrophic catchments (one undrained control, two tr...
Article
Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recovery of hydrological conditions after restoration in previously drained peatlands is typically faster process compared to changes in runoff water quality. Often nutrient load from restored sites increase remarkably during restoration operation and reduce over time when conditions stabilize. However, in some sites nutrient load can remain high f...
Article
A before-after-control approach was used to analyze the impact of peatland restoration on hydrology, based on high temporal resolution water-table (WT) data from 43 boreal peatlands representative of a south-boreal to north-boreal climate gradient. During the study, 24 forestry drained sites were restored and 19 pristine peatlands used as control s...
Article
Transfer functions are now commonly used to reconstruct past environmental variability from palaeoecological data. However, such approaches need to be critically appraised. Testate amoeba-based transfer functions are an established method for the quantitative reconstruction of past water-table variations in peatlands, and have been applied to resea...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Peatland restorations have been actively done in Finland since the 1970s. The restoration has covered about 1300 hectares of land annually in order to meet the global target of halting the loss of biodiversity and secure ecosystem services. This is for the fact that restoration of drained peatlands is believed to restore back the lost biodiversity...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There is increasing interest to restore degraded peatland, but long term effects of restoration are poorly known. Totally 46 boreal peatland were included in a study set, including 20 fens, 13 pine mires and 13 spruce mires, with peatland types ranging from nearly ombrotrophic Sphagnum bogs to rich fens. Study sites covered spatially almost whole F...
Article
The natural resources conservation service (NRCS) curve number method is widely used to estimate runoff from rainfall events for four hydrological soil groups (A, B, C, and D). However, the NRCS soil groups do not yet include peat soils. Therefore, this study analyzed 59 rainfall-runoff events from two peat-dominated watersheds in Finland (Marjasuo...
Conference Paper
Finland is a country where its possession of peatlands compared to the total surface area of the country puts in the leading categories globally in peatland possession having 33.5% of its total land area covered with peatlands. Recent interest has grown in using peatlands as temporary flood control barriers by taking advantage of the high water hol...

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Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
WATERPEAT (Water management for sustainable use and protection of peatlands) was accepted for funding in the Water JPI 2018 call - Water challenges for a changing world. The WATERPEAT project has partners from Finland (OULU), Norway (NIBIO), Ireland (NUIG) and Indonesia (UGM university). The total budget is 1,1 M€ funded jointly by European Union and participating member states. The project is coordinated by Bjørn Kløve from OULU. The project PIs are Prof. Björn Klöve (UOULU), Dr. Hanna Silvennoinen (NIBIO), Dr. Mark Healy (NUIG) and MSc Oka Karyanto (UGM). The project has study sites in Finland, Norway, Ireland and Indonesia. Stay tuned for updates on goals, work packages etc.