Merrick Powell

Merrick Powell
Macquarie University · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy (Psychology)

About

3
Publications
1,033
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
13
Citations
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
13 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810

Publications

Publications (3)
Article
Research suggests that engagement with music containing violent themes (e.g., extreme metal, rap) often results in positive psychosocial outcomes for fans. However, it is not clear why fans are attracted to ‘violent’ music in the first place. Experiment 1 (N = 146) examined whether trait morbid curiosity is associated with fans' self-reported consu...
Article
Full-text available
Fans of extreme metal and rap music with violent themes, hereafter termed ‘violently themed music’, predominantly experience positive emotional and psychosocial outcomes in response to this music. However, negative emotional responses to preferred music are reported to a greater extent by such fans than by fans of non-violently themed music. We inv...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme metal and rap music with violent themes are sometimes blamed for eliciting antisocial behaviours, but growing evidence suggests that music with violent themes can have positive emotional, cognitive, and social consequences for fans. We addressed this apparent paradox by comparing how fans of violent and non-violent music respond emotionally...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The 'Violence in Music' project examines the forms and prevalence of violent music; its short- and long-term effects on aggression, emotional states, and cognitive function; and neurological correlates of engagement with violent music. The project aims to develop an empirically driven model of the pathways between violent music, thought and action, and to test hypotheses for how negative consequences of exposure to violent music can be minimised and social and psychological benefits maximised.