Meriam Guellil

Meriam Guellil
University of Vienna | UniWien · Department of Evolutionary Anthropology

PhD

About

23
Publications
7,638
Reads
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185
Citations
Citations since 2016
23 Research Items
185 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220204060
Introduction
Genomics & phylogenomics of viral/bacterial pathogens, ancient metagenomics.
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - August 2022
University of Tartu
Position
  • Postdoctoral Researcher
Description
  • Study of human microbial pathogen evolution and genomics using ancient DNA
May 2015 - October 2018
University of Oslo
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • The MedPlag project is funded by an ERC Advanced Grant
September 2014 - May 2015
The University of York
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
October 2015 - September 2018
University of Oslo
Field of study
  • Genomics
September 2012 - September 2013
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology
February 2009 - February 2012
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Significance Louse-borne relapsing fever was one of the major diseases affecting Western human populations, with its last major pandemic killing millions after World War I. Despite the major role fevers have played in epidemic events throughout history, molecular evidence for the presence of their etiological agent has been extremely scarce in hist...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The spread and evolution of plague have been under debate in the past few years. However, very little is known of the dynamics of the plague pathogen, Yersinia pestis , during the last phase of the Second Plague Pandemic in Europe (18th and 19th century). We present nine ancient Y. pestis genomes from the Second Plague Pandemic. CHE1 i...
Article
Full-text available
Background Hansen’s disease (leprosy), widespread in medieval Europe, is today mainly prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions with around 200,000 new cases reported annually. Despite its long history and appearance in historical records, its origins and past dissemination patterns are still widely unknown. Applying ancient DNA approaches to i...
Article
Full-text available
Background The human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae was the main cause of bacterial meningitis in children and a major cause of worldwide infant mortality before the introduction of a vaccine in the 1980s. Although the occurrence of serotype b (Hib), the most virulent type of H. influenzae , has since decreased, reports of infections with other se...
Article
Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a life-long infection spread by oral contact, infects a majority of adults globally. Phylogeographic clustering of sampled diversity into European, pan-Eurasian, and African groups has suggested the virus codiverged with human migrations out of Africa, although a much younger origin has also been proposed. We p...
Article
Full-text available
The study of human pathogens, their genomes and their evolution has been revolutionized by the introduction of ancient DNA techniques both in the lab and in silico. Today, palaeogenomic research can reconstruct microbial genomes starting from as much as a couple of reads detected during screenings. With every year, the number of organisms and genom...
Preprint
Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a life-long infection spread by oral contact, today infects a majority of adults globally, yet no ancient HSV-1 genomes have yet been published. Phylogeographic clustering of sampled diversity into European, pan-Eurasian, and African groups(Pfaff et al. 2016; Szpara, Tafuri, et al. 2014) has suggested that the...
Article
Full-text available
The plague of 1630–1632 was one of the deadliest plague epidemics to ever hit Northern Italy, and for many of the affected regions, it was also the last. While accounts on plague during the early 1630s in Florence and Milan are frequent, much less is known about the city of Imola. We analyzed the full skeletal assemblage of four mass graves (n = 13...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient DNA from Yersinia pestis has been identified in skeletons at four urban burial grounds in Cambridge, England, and at a nearby rural cemetery. Dating to between ad 1349 and 1561, these represent individuals who died of plague during the second pandemic. Most come from normative individual burials, rather than mass graves. This pattern repres...
Article
Full-text available
Plague continued to afflict Europe for more than five centuries after the Black Death. Yet, by the 17th century, the dynamics of plague had changed, leading to its slow decline in Western Europe over the subsequent 200 y, a period for which only one genome was previously available. Using a multidisciplinary approach, combining genomic and historica...
Article
Full-text available
Dental calculus, or mineralized plaque, represents a record of ancient biomolecules and food residues. Recently, ancient metagenomics made it possible to unlock the wealth of microbial and dietary information of dental calculus to reconstruct oral microbiomes and lifestyle of humans from the past. Although most studies have so far focused on ancien...
Article
The Early Iron Age nomadic Scythians have been described as a confederation of tribes of different origins, based on ancient DNA evidence [1-3]. It is still unclear how much of the Scythian dominance in the Eurasian Steppe was due to movements of people and how much reflected cultural diffusion and elite dominance. We present new whole-genome seque...
Article
Full-text available
The Early Iron Age nomadic Scythians have been described as a confederation of tribes of different origins, based on ancient DNA evidence. It is still unclear how much of the Scythian dominance in the Eurasian Steppe was due to movements of people and how much reflected cultural diffusion and elite dominance. We present new whole-genome sequences o...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last few years, genomic studies on Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of all known plague epidemics, have considerably increased in numbers, spanning a period of about 5,000 y. Nonetheless, questions concerning historical reservoirs and routes of transmission remain open. Here, we present and describe five genomes from the second half o...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Assessing the biological and social impact of the Black Death in Cambridge. www.aftertheplague.com
Project
MedPlag is a ERC advanced grant (PI B. Bramanti). The project aims to elucidate ecology, transmission modalities and transmission routes of medieval plague pandemics via a multidisciplinary approach and a wide range of techniques and methods. To know more about: https://sites.google.com/site/medplag/home