Meredith M. Doellman

Meredith M. Doellman
University of Chicago | UC · Department of Ecology & Evolution

PhD

About

37
Publications
4,250
Reads
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811
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
University of Chicago
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2013 - May 2020
University of Notre Dame
Field of study
  • Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics
August 2013 - September 2019
University of Notre Dame
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences
September 2005 - December 2010
Northeastern University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
New species form through the evolution of genetic barriers to gene flow between previously interbreeding populations. The understanding of how speciation proceeds is hampered by our inability to follow cases of incipient speciation through time. Comparative approaches examining different diverging taxa may offer limited inferences, unless they fulf...
Article
Adaptation to novel environments can result in unanticipated genomic responses to selection. Here, we illustrate how multifarious, correlational selection helps explain a counterintuitive pattern of genetic divergence between the recently derived apple‐ and ancestral hawthorn‐infesting host races of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae). The...
Article
An outstanding issue in the study of insect host races concerns the idea of ‘recursive adaptive divergence’, whereby adaptation can occur repeatedly across space and/or time, and the most recent adaptive episode is defined by one or more previously similar cases. The host plant shift of the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: T...
Article
Full-text available
Endosymbiont induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) may play an important role in arthropod speciation. However, whether CI consistently becomes associated or coupled with other host‐related forms of reproductive isolation (RI) to impede the transfer of endosymbionts between hybridizing populations and further the divergence process remains an op...
Article
A key to understanding life's great diversity is discerning how competing organisms divide limiting resources to coexist in diverse communities. While temporal resource partitioning has long been hypothesized to reduce the negative effects of interspecific competition, empirical evidence suggests that time may not often be an axis along which anima...
Article
Divergent adaptation to new ecological opportunities can be an important factor initiating speciation. However, as niches are filled during adaptive radiations, trait divergence driving reproductive isolation between sister taxa may also result in trait convergence with more distantly related taxa, increasing the potential for reticulated gene flow...
Chapter
According to conservative estimates there are at least 10 million eukaryotic species on Earth and perhaps as many as 100 million or even a trillion. Speciation is the process primarily responsible for this great diversity of life. Here, we summarize our current understanding of speciation and highlight some of the important factors and mechanisms i...
Article
Full-text available
An important criterion for understanding speciation is the geographic context of population divergence. Three major modes of allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation define the extent of spatial overlap and gene flow between diverging populations. However, mixed modes of speciation are also possible, whereby populations experience periods o...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Organisms living in seasonal environments must synchronize their growth and reproduction to favorable times of the year. Our study highlights how the timing of dormancy can rapidly evolve to synchronize insects with changes in seasonal food sources. Dormancy is often conceptualized as suspended animation or arrested development, but ou...
Article
Studies assessing the predictability of evolution typically focus on short-term adaptation within populations or the repeatability of change among lineages. A missing consideration in speciation research is to determine whether natural selection predictably transforms standing genetic variation within populations into differences between species. H...
Article
Insect pests destroy ~15% of all U.S. crops, resulting in losses of $15 billion annually. Thus, developing cheap, quick, and reliable methods for detecting harmful species is critical to curtail insect damage and lessen economic impact. The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, is a major invasive pest threatening the multibillion-dollar apple in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding rapid adaptation requires quantifying natural selection on traits and elucidating the genotype-phenotype relationship for those traits. However, recent studies have often failed to predict the direction of adaptive allelic variation in natural populations from laboratory studies. Here, we test for genomic signatures of genetic correla...
Article
Ecological speciation via host‐shifting is often invoked as a mechanism for insect diversification, but the relative importance of this process is poorly understood. The shift of Rhagoletis pomonella in the 1850s from the native downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis, to introduced apple, Malus pumila, is a classic example of sympatric host race formatio...
Article
Full-text available
The small cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae , is a major agricultural pest of cruciferous crops and has been introduced to every continent except South America and Antarctica as a result of human activities. In an effort to reconstruct the near-global invasion history of P. rapae , we developed a citizen science project, the “Pieris Project,” a...
Article
Full-text available
Ascertaining the causes of adaptive radiation is central to understanding how new species arise and come to vary with their resources. The ecological theory posits adaptive radiation via divergent natural selection associated with novel resource use; an alternative suggests character displacement following speciation in allopatry and then secondary...
Chapter
Full-text available
Intracellular bacteria are ubiquitous in the insect world, with perhaps the best-studied example being the alphaproteobacterium, Wolbachia. Like most endosymbionts, Wolbachia cannot be cultivated outside of its host cells, hindering traditional microbial characterization techniques. Furthermore, multiple Wolbachia strains can be present within a si...
Preprint
Full-text available
A major goal of invasion and climate change biology research is to understand the ecological and evolutionary responses of organisms to anthropogenic disturbance, especially over large spatial and temporal scales. One significant, and sometimes unattainable, challenge of these studies is garnering sufficient numbers of relevant specimens, especiall...
Article
Full-text available
Taxa harboring high levels of standing variation may be more likely to adapt to rapid environmental shifts and experience ecological speciation. Here, we characterize geographic and host‐related differentiation for 10,241 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Rhagoletis pomonella fruit flies to infer whether standing genetic variation in adult eclosio...
Article
Darwin recognized species as discontinuous, yet considered them to be formed by an incremental process of natural selection. Recent theoretical work on ‘genome-wide congealing’ is bridging this gap between the gradualism of divergent selection and rapid genome-wide divergence, particularly during ecological speciation-with-gene-flow. Host races and...
Article
Full-text available
The shift of the fruit fly Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) in the mid‐1800s from downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis (Torrey & Asa Gray) Scheele, to introduced domesticated apple, Malus domestica (Borkhausen), in the eastern USA is a model for ecological divergence with gene flow. A similar system may exist in the northwestern USA and British Columbia, C...
Article
Full-text available
A major goal of evolutionary biology is to understand how variation within populations gets partitioned into differences between reproductively isolated species. Here, we examine the degree to which diapause life history timing, a critical adaptation promoting population divergence, explains geographic and host-related genetic variation in ancestra...
Article
Full-text available
Social status is an important predictor of parasite risk in vertebrates. To date, general frameworks to explain status-related variation in parasitism have remained elusive. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated five hypotheses proposed to explain status-related variation in parasitism in male and female vertebrates by leveraging variation in hierarc...
Article
The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a serious quarantine pest in the apple-growing regions of central Washington and Oregon. The fly is believed to have been introduced into the Pacific Northwest via the transport of larval-infested apples near Portland, Oregon, within the last 40 yr. However, R. pomonella al...
Article
Speciation-with-gene-flow may require adaptive divergence of multiple traits to generate strong ecologically based reproductive isolation. Extensive negative pleiotropy or physical linkage of genes in the wrong phase affecting these diverging traits may therefore hinder speciation, while genetic independence or 'modularity' among phenotypic traits...
Chapter
According to conservative estimates there are about 10 million eukaryotic species on Earth and perhaps as many as 100 million or even a trillion. Speciation is the process primarily responsible for this great diversity of life. Here, we summarize our current understanding of speciation and highlight some of the important factors and mechanisms invo...
Article
The earth is in the midst of a biodiversity crisis, and projections indicate continuing and accelerating rates of global changes. Future alterations in communities and ecosystems may be precipitated by changes in the abundance of strongly interacting species, whose disappearance can lead to profound changes in abundance of other species, including...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogeographic studies provide critical insight into the evolutionary histories of model organisms; yet, to date, range-wide data are lacking for the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis, a classic example of marine sympatric speciation. Here, we use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to demonstrate that L. saxatilis is not monophyletic for t...
Article
Phylogeographic studies provide critical insight into the evolutionary histories of model organisms; yet, to date, range-wide data are lacking for the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis, a classic example of marine sympatric speciation. I utilized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data to demonstrate that L. saxatilis is not monophyletic, but is...
Article
How vertebrate blood vessels sense acute hypoxia and respond either by constricting (hypoxic vasoconstriction) or dilating (hypoxic vasodilation) has not been resolved. In the present study we compared the mechanical and electrical responses of select blood vessels to hypoxia and H2S, measured vascular H2S production, and evaluated the effects of i...
Article
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a recently identified gasotransmitter that may mediate hypoxic responses in vascular smooth muscle. H2S also appears to be a signaling molecule in mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle, but its existence and function in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle have not been examined. In the present study we examined H2S pro...
Article
Full-text available
Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a recently identified endogenous vasodilator in mammals. In steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Osteichthyes), H(2)S produces both dose-dependent dilation and a unique dose-dependent constriction. In this study, we examined H(2)S vasoactivity in all vertebrate classes to determine whether H(2)S is universally v...

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